Topics L – Z

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L [TOP]

Laborurers, see Charity Work, the Poor, Labourers, Workers

 

Labouchere, Mary Matilda Georgiana (née Howard) (m: 1st and last Baron Taunton) (Aunt of Ld. F.)
16Apr1866, Terrified Toryism – I went in lonely dignity to Ly. Taunton’s ball; Sir Walter Farquhar poured terrified Toryism into my ear.

 

Labouchere, Henry, 1st and last Baron Taunton
16May1866, Milman, Fawcett, Ecce Homo – The poor Westminster bank where all Meriel’s kitchen money and other charities bank, has shut up like the others….We dined at Ld. Taunton’s, meeting Dean Milman and Mr. Fawcett.

 

Lacaita, Sir James, librarian
23Jul1865, Sir Lacaita Reads “Cinque Maggio” – I made Sir James [FN: Sir James Lacaita who was Librarian at Chatsworth. The "Cinque Maggio" is, of course, the famous poem of Manzoni on the death of Napoleon.] read us the “Cinque Maggio,”
28Nov1865, Lacaita Delights with ‘Cinque Maggio’ – Sir James Lacaita delighted many of us with a spout of Tasso, but especially with the glorious “Cinque Maggio.”
15Nov1875, Everything Vanishes Away – Found the Cokes, Sir J. Lacaita, B., the Howards. In the course of the week came Ld. Laverton, Mr. Doyle, Mr. Henry Cowper. Emma, B., Di, and I read Dante with Lacaita, and I began at 6 “David Copperfield” in Aunt Fanny’s room.
04Jun1877, Uncle W. in Famous Force – Pleasant dinner in Harley Street, meeting Sybella, Stephy, Dr. Clark, Sir James Lacaita. Uncle W. in famous force; held forth like a brilliant book upon a notion he laid down that persecution was never taken up by the Church as such until the Papal pretensions arose. Sir J. and Dr. Clark demurred a little, but we badly wanted some one to stand up to him, and so make a good argument of it.

 

Landseer, Edwin Henry
02Feb1867, Landseer’s Lions – Landseer’s lions are actually mounted on the pedestals of the Nelson monument.

 

Lansdowne, Lord
06Jul1859, Wimbledon – In the evening a brilliant party at Ld. Lansdowne’s
20Jun1862, Lord Lansdowne – a bent and withered old man with a star on his brass-buttoned coat, his left arm, crippled with gout, in a sling, sat near me
09Jul1866, Lansdowne Dies Suddenly – Ld. Lansdowne died suddenly the other day, being seized one night with a stroke while playing at cards, at White’s : she was sent for, and getting home and finding him speechless, in her agony tore off her necklace,

 

Lanyon, Sir William Owen
05Dec1871, First Day in Kingston – the beauty was indescribable. The first thing that struck one all of a heap was the common roadside hedges being made of huge cacti!…a delightful A.D.C. turned up of the name of Capt. Lanyon took possession of us, and carried us off to see the Lunatic Asylum and Penitentiary. The Asylum the most admirable thing I ever saw, under Dr. Allen, who found it in ’64 in the most fearful state of filth and mismanagement and has got it into perfect order.
08Dec1871, A Coffee Plantation – Capt. L. rode with us to Middleton, a coffee plantation of the Duke of Buckingham’s, and we saw the clean, pleasant process of preparing the berry. Strings of ladies with attendant gentlemen were going goose-file down the precipitous bridle-paths in correct Rotten Row get-up, chimney-pots and all, on their way to a ball.
23Feb1880, Transvaal and Sister Dora – Mr. Gurdon was at dinner, just back from S. Africa, and confirming a most grubous letter lately had from Col. Lanyon who is administering the Transvaal. According to him, whether the annexation of the Transvaal was right or wrong, we have put all the fat in the fire now, by leaving it for nearly 3 years (regardless of promises) minus any constitution whatever…
15Mar1881, Peace Without Victory – Negotiations are going on with the Boers. It does not need to be a jingo to feel the humiliation of making peace without a victory after 3 defeats. But (owing I fear to our dear Sir Owen Lanyon) we have brought the situation a good deal on ourselves, from not setting negotiations on foot the minute we came into power, and so getting out of the mess the late Government had got us into.

 

Lascelles, Caroline Georgiana (née Howard) (sister of Lord F’s mother)
30May1865, Eddy and Emma Engaged – Lady Caroline’s face did look good to see I paid happy May a long visit : Di and Lucy came in, and we all jabbered in a mad way.
16Jun1865, Another Fall from a Horse – Lou fortunately was able to join on to the Lascelles, and F. and I rode sedately home at a foot’s pace. We had one of our snug and rare tête-à-tête evenings
29Apr1874, Sir Ch. Trevelyan Remembers – Visited Aunt Caroline, and Mrs. Dugdale, who seems to be keeping house for poor widowed Sir Ch. Trevelyan. He was there, and enjoyed our visit, and showing off a beautiful Dugdale baby. Went off into reminiscences of his youth,

 

Lascelles, Emma Elizabeth (Lord F.’s cousin), see Cavendish, Emma Elizabeth

 

Lascelles, Frank (brother of Emma)
12Oct1867, Dined in Great Luxury – Paris – We dined in great luxury and enjoyment with the Lascelles’ [FN: No doubt the Frank Lascelles; afterwards Ambassador at Berlin.] at the Café Durand, and then went together to the Théâtre Français, where “Hernani” is being played, and enchanted us.

 

Lascelles, Mary Emma (née Olliffe)
23Jan1876, Wonders About Wine and Childbirth – Mary (Frank) Lascelles has a little girl. [FN: Wife of Sir Frank Lascelles, many years Ambassador at Berlin. The "little girl" (Florence Caroline Lascelles) became the wife of Sir Cecil Spring Rice, Ambassador at Washington.]

 

Lascelles, Mary (May) (Lord F.’s cousin)
24May1864, Luncheon at Devonshire House – At luncheon were Mrs. Coke, Emma and May Lascelles.
17Jul1865, This Horrible Interloper – May and I watched the fly drive up, and the Captain puzzled us by marching to the Porter’s lodge, collecting his thoughts maybe, or perhaps in search of the Duke.
13Feb1866, The Lower Class and the Upper Class – May Lascelles came to see me about 4, after which I smiled for a few minutes upon a little tea-business at Auntie P.’s, and then drove off to S. Ann’s National Schools, Limehouse
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

Laslett, William
30May1868, Electionums – seems the enemy has been outrageously base and unscrupulous, spending shoals of money among the poor ignorant Black-country people, putting about all sorts of lies, and generally disgracing themselves ; also having 100 paid agents to Charles’s 20. They say Laslett must have spent near £20,000 ; our side £6,000

 

Latimer, Lord and Lady
07Jun1862, Volume 7 of the Diary Begins – We dined with the Latimers at Trinity, meeting Sir E. and Ly. Head, D. and Dss. of Argyll, Ly. L. Cavendish, Ld. Bristol, and Ld. J. Hervey, etc.

 

Lawley, Beilby Richard, 2nd Baron Wenlock (son: Aunt Wenlock)
27May1873, Harcourt Cynical and Unprincipled – Dined with Sir Harcourt Johnstone, meeting Wenlocks and various folk ; Mr. W. Harcourt was there, as cynical and unprincipled in talk as may be! The most pleasing thing he had to say was that Cavendish was the only member of the Govt. who had common sense : “He’s the leader for me.”

 

Lawley, Bielby, 3rd Baron Wenlock (Cousin Bingy, son of Cousin Ebbett, Lady Elizabeth Lawley) (m: Lady Constance Mary Lascelles)
07Oct1858, A Pleasant Day – two comic songs and the most capital jig performed by Lord Boyle and Cousin Bick
09Oct1858, Amazing Fun – Bingy paid me a most elegant compliment

 

Lawley, Caroline Elizabeth (Carrie) (dau: Aunt Wenlock) (m: Lt. Col. Hon. Caryl Craven Molyneux)
03May1865, An Old Prosaic Couple – We went (and I chaperoned Lou! at which I died) to a concert at Auntie P’s. Carry Lawley was there, just out, and very good-looking.
18May1865, Princess Helena Holds a Drawing-room – Carry Lawley and Mary Wortley were brought out : Carry is very handsome, towering above her jenny-wren of a mother.
20May1865, Dined at Lord Wharncliffe’s – We dined at Lord Wharncliffe’s, meeting the Wenlocks and Carry, Colonel and Lady Louisa Feilding, Captain Egerton, Lord Claud Hamilton, the Burys, Cissy Wortley, etc.

 

Lawley, Paul Beilby Lawley Thompson, 1st Baron Wenlock
29Oct1863, A Gentlemen’s Dinner – to which went all the gentlemen except Lord Wenlock and Ralph Neville, who stayed at home and squired us
09Aug1866, York Topsy-Turvy for T.R.H. – ESCRICK, The house of her cousin, Lord Wenlock. We drove to Bishopsthorpe, a dragfull and four, to dinner, to meet the Prince and Princess of Wales. Fifty-four people dined and it was very well done.

 

Lawley, Caroline (née Neville) (Aunt Wenlock) (m: 1st Baron Wenlock) (dau: 2nd Baron Braybrooke) (her mother’s aunt)
26Jan1855, Russell has resigned – By the bye, Aunt Wenlock was here the other day, gave me a delightful book : ” Half-hours with the Best Authors.”
18May1855, Crimean Heroes – I, only think what a privilege ! went with Aunt Wenlock to see the medals given to the Crimean heroes by the Queen, bless her
18May1859, Journey to London – Papa and M. dined with At. Wenlock, I was begged off
28Jun1862, Three Day Cricket Match – At. Wenlock has given me a ball-gown!

 

Lawley, Elizabeth (née Grosvenor) (Cousin Ebbett) (m: 2nd Baron Wenlock)
04Oct1858, A Drive and a Comet – the four-in-hand, Cousin Ebbett and I on the outside : the aged Meriel within
09Oct1858, Amazing Fun – Do you think anyone can know her without liking her?
24Jun1859, Those Old Times – went to see Cousin Ebbett making ourselves fools over the darling little blue-eyed infant
11May1864, The Queen’s Second Court – Then to Carlton Terrace, where I found Fred; then pleasant talk with him ; a visit from C. Ebbett; back to B. Palace for dinner

 

Lawrence, Sir John
23May1859, Party at the Admiralty – who saved the N.W. Provinces of India

 

Lear, Edward, painter
24Dec1877, Visiting in Italy, Jane Morris – Paid a visit in the morning to one of Sybella’s innumerable “old friends,” Edward Lear the artist. He remembers giving lessons to Freddy’s mother in Rome in ’39 when F. was 3 years old. Showed us many beautiful sketches.

 

Lecky, William Edward Hartpole
18Jun1867, Lecky and Rationalism – and Mr. Lecky, author of what I have an intuitive feeling is a shallow tho’ clever book on “The Progress of Rationalism”; a rather affected-looking fair man, with long hair and over-innocent expression!
26Jul1881, I Can’t Bear Lecky! – We dined with the Roundells ; met Goldwin Smiths and Leckys. (I can’t bear Lecky ! with his innocent long face, looking as if butter wouldn’t melt in his mouth.)

 

Leeds, duchy of, see Osborne

 

Lefevre, Mr.
27May1862, John Talbot is Beaten for Kidderminster – Gay ball at Ly. Caroline Kerrison’s, where, in spite of a new gown, I danced Once ; with Mr. Lefevre
08Jul1871, Lord Tennyson: Rat-Taily Hair – I partook of no less than 3 teas : Sir J. Lefevre’s, Auntie P.’s at Downing Street, and Charlotte Spencer’s to Ly. Superintendents. At Downing Street I was introduced to Tennyson, a dirty man with opium-glazed eyes and rat-taily hair hanging down his back. He asked if Papa still translated…

 

Leigh, Very Rev. William, Dean of Hereford
27Aug1862, A Perverted Game of Croquet – We brought home with us for 2 nights said Mr. Leigh, young clergyman brother of Lord Leigh

 

Leighton, Archibald
10Jan1864, Missed Second Service – Was glad I brought Arnold’s sermons, and Archb. Leighton with me ; but 0 dear, it doesn’t feel much like Sunday.

 

Leighton, Frederic, 1st Baron Leighton
21Jul1870, The Story of Painter George Mason – I saw Mr. Mason the landscape painter at Mr. Richmond’s ; poor man, he looks dying of consumption. Mr. R. told me his terrible strange story. He was brought up as heir to a good fortune, liberally educated, and sent on the “grand tour.” At Rome he heard of his father’s death, and that he was left penniless…At last, Leighton saw and admired his pictures, and brought him into notice.
06May1871, Paintings by Watts and Leighton – Academy with F. at 1.30 ; not frightfully full… There are 2 splendid portraits by Watts of Millais and Leighton. Said Leighton’s pictures I don’t care for ; and young Richmond has painted one of the same type : ancients playing at bowls with nothing on, which I can’t appreciate.

 

Leopole II, King of the Belgians (first cousin to Queen Victoria)
09May1872, Breakfast with the King of the Belgians – We bkfasted one of these days at No. 11 to meet the King of the Belgians. Herbert the painter, the most affected of men, rhapsodized in his ridiculous sham broken English abt the King’s likeness to S. Louis and Francis I. He certainly is exactly like the pictures of the latter.
15Dec1865, General Mourning for the King of the Belgians – The King of the Belgians is dead, and there is a general mourning for 10 days. The Queen will nevertheless appear at the opening of Parliament, but will not read the Speech…. A great thing it is, however.
05Jul1866, Some Civilities for the King of the Belgians – to M. Van de Weyer’s, wishing to set some civilities on foot for the King of the Belgians, who has come for Pss. Helena’s marriage, and is not only quartered at an hotel, which is the poor Queen’s way now, but left without even a Royal carriage.

 

Prince Leopold (son of Queen Victoria)
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – precious little Prince Leopold, whom I have never seen before, a lovely little fat darling, with the same large blue eyes and curly head as his Highness’s little brother
11Sep1863, Poor Peggies – has a funny, waggish face, with the brightest blue eyes ; he is miserably thin and puny
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – Miss Bowater (I don’t exactly know in what capacity, but she is an intimate friend of Prince Leopold—I was glad to see somebody under 40 !)
29Apr1864, Fourth Waiting Continues – Poor little Prince Leopold was full of talk and cheerfulness, but his small thin face grew pinched with cold ; and I wished I cd take him into my arms and cover him warmly up.
09May1864, I Like Royal Travelling Excedingly! – capping verses with the Princesses and poor little Prince Leopold, who made great play with “To be or not to be.”
07May1872, A Tiring Tea at Buckingham Palace – Pr. Arthur and Leopold both looked well and nice, though sadly small mannikins : Pr. Leopold the tallest and almost handsome.

 

Leveson-Gower, Albert
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – A select circle of tufts were there Lords Newry, Parker ; also Ld. Albert Leveson-Gower

 

Leveson-Gower, Castila Rosalind (née Campbell) (m: 2nd Earl Granville)
08Sep1865, Lord Granville Engaged, Rather Awful – We heard of a very interesting marriage : Lord Granville to a pretty Scotch Miss Campbell, only 17 and just out. 33 years between them ! rather awful.
09Sep1865, Dismay Over Lord Granville’s Marriage – There is some dismay over Lord Granville’s marriage : such frightful disparity of years : the poor little body will be in all human probability a widow before she is 40 ; they say she is full of fun and high spirits.
17Jan1866, All Expecting, Ah Dear Me – Ly. Henry Scott, Ly. Granville, and Ly. Dudley are all said to be expecting babies. Ah, dear me !
10Feb1866, Religion-that-will-suit-all-creeds – We chose a pretty quaint bit of old china for a tardy wedding-present to Lady Granville.
06Mar1866, Bride: Measles, Groom: Gout – We dined at Ld. Granville’s; his little wife is a most winsome, pretty creature, with a bright sunshiny manner, and I should think plenty of character. It isn’t proper for a bride to have the measles, and a bridegroom the gout! but it has been their case.
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – “Is it you or Mamma that’s going to give me a little brother?”
20May1874, A Meeting of Supplemental Ladies – Went with Lady Granville to a little meeting of Supplemental ladies at the Oldfields’, to discuss a little “Steppingstone” Home for little would-be servant gals of low degree. Charlotte Spencer, Mrs. Loyd Lindsay, Ly. Marion Alford, Aunt Yaddy, and other great dames were there.
23Jul1874, Fancy Dress Ball at Marlborough House – We dined with the Granvilles, meeting Cowpers, Cavendish, Ld. Mandeville… Conversation turned much on the fancy ball at Marlboro’ House, which came off t’other night, and for which I saw Cavendish arrayed in Tudor costume…Ly. Granville very striking in Vandyck dress, with great shady hat. The whole thing was arranged and set in order by Leighton the artist.
27Aug1877, Ld. Granville Speaks at Bradford – The Granvilles came Monday, and on Tuesday we had a field-day in honour of the opening of the Liberal Club at Bradford… Ld. Granville as flustered and anxious over the preparation of his two speeches as any new young M.P. Ly. G. sat up writing for him till 1 on Monday night
23Jul1878, More Derby-Salisbury Business – who should be on the Thames-tunnel landing-place but Ly. Granville!!! I wonder how many chances there were against our meeting on a penny boat. She had a brother with her, and had been to Ratclyffe Highway to buy a paroqueet. We talked of the horrid Derby-Salisbury business; Ld. Derby has found his mem. written at the time of his resignation…
10Mar1879, Fire at Granville’s – 15 fire-engines put it out and sadly ruined the walls and the rest of the house, but everything moveable was saved, except poor Ly. G.’s best gowns and lace. I hoped she would send the children to us, or that they would come themselves; but other folks carried them off, and we only put up 6 maids and no end of pictures, etc.
12Jul1880, An Ugly Waggish Mug – Ly. Granville’s 2nd son born prosperously on Sun. the 11th, a great blessing, the last poor little thing having died with water on the brain.

 

Leveson-Gower, Edward Frederick (Mr. Leveson)
14Jun1865, Busy Day in London – but had to dine without him at Lady Rivers’, as he had a clashing engagement. Mr. Leveson took me in, and was pleasant.
12Jul1870, Discussing Papal Infallibility – We dined at Mr. Leveson’s, meeting Ld. Castlerosse, Ly. Airlie and a daughter just out, Ly. Alwyne and Lord William Compton, etc. Lord Castlerosse, an old-fashioned, Liberal R. Catholic, talked to me about the Infallibility dogma in a most astonishing way.
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – Mr. Leveson [FN: Hon. Frederick Leveson-Gower, brother of Lord Granville.], hearing with great philosophy the arrival of Ld. Granville’s son and heir, just announced, cutting out Mr. Leveson’s boy
15Mar1873, Uncle W. Gives an Ivory Madonna – We came to Cliveden, with the W. E. G.’s (he walking to Paddington), Mazy, the Dss. of Argyll, and Mr. Leveson. Uncle W. has given me a little ivory Madonna he picked up on his way to the station, in a shop! I told him it was highly compromising and Ultramontane.
20Feb1874, A Great Five Years – Uncle W. picking up his spirits already;..Declaimed about it all a good deal; but after all Mr. Leveson was right t’other day when he said no Government ever went out with cleaner hands and a more glorious past..
08Dec1874, The Chatsworth Magic Lantern – We are come to the last slide of the Chatsworth magic lantern: the Duke of Cambridge and his equerry, a funny little man called Tyrwhitt, of no particular age, in a grey wig; Lord Carlingford and Ly. Waldegrave, the Spencers, Mr. Leveson, Cavendish.
02Jul1877, Garden Party with Poor People – Lateish we went off to Brocket; joined at the station by Ly. Ripon and finding Mr. Leveson here. Intensely still place, looking like a clearing in an old forest; too much betreed, but with some glades stretching away, with bracken and rabbits.

 

Leveson-Gower, George, 2nd Earl Granville (Lord Granville) (1815 – 1891)
30Dec1861, He taught me how to reign – She said to Ld. Granville: “He taught me how to reign. I hope I shall show that I can do it.”
21Nov1862, My form of shyness – Ly. C. Grosvenor came. Ld. Granville was expected, but Ly. Granville is ill
05Mar1865, At a Play with the Wales’s – A little “doment” with a French play at Ld. Granville’s, who had got the Wales’s: the Prince astonishingly fat, the Princess looking lovely, tho’ she is to be confined this summer.
22Jun1865, Alice Arbuthnot Killed by Lightening – Lord Granville, who had been expected, wrote to say that he had that moment heard of the death of his niece Alice Arbuthnot — killed by lightning ; at Interlachen, as they were coming home from their wedding tour.
08Sep1865, Lord Granville Engaged, Rather Awful – We heard of a very interesting marriage : Lord Granville to a pretty Scotch Miss Campbell, only 17 and just out. 33 years between them ! rather awful.
26Sep1865, Lou and Frank are Married – P.S.—Lord Granville was married to his 18-year-old bride to-day : and they telegraphed congratulations, which were returned.
07Feb1866, Cavendish to the War Office – Cavendish got a mysterious scrap from Ld. Granville yesterday or the day before, containing the words : “Of course I congratulate you.” Not being aware that he was going to be married, the Markiss was puzzled…
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – hearing with great philosophy the arrival of Ld. Granville’s son and heir, just announced
02Jul1872, A Smart Dinner at Dev. House – in the big square room, very splendid and stately : Lornes, Tecks, Granvilles, Brownlows, Tallee, Spencers. Tail.
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are
21Jul1873, Bp. of Winchester Dies From Fall – the appalling news of the death of the Bp. of Winchester…He travelled with Ld. Granville to Leatherhead, where they were met by horses that they might ride the rest of the way to Holmbury. They were cantering down a grassy slope.. when the Bishop’s horse stumbled at a grip, and came down on his knees (or all but). The Bishop was thrown over its head and, falling heavily on his head and turning right over, dislocated his neck and was killed on the spot.
23Jul1874, Fancy Dress Ball at Marlborough House – We dined with the Granvilles, meeting Cowpers, Cavendish, Ld. Mandeville [FN: Afterwards 8th Duke of Manchester.] (an ugly youth, but rather taking), De Vescis and daughter, Bertie, Duke of Sutherland, and certain Americans, etc., one of whom got drunk. Conversation turned much on the fancy ball at Marlboro’ House, which came off t’other night, and for which I saw Cavendish arrayed in Tudor costume. He looked famously well and handsome.
18Jan1875, Gladstone May Retire – To-day the blow that has so long been dreaded falls on the unhappy divided Liberal party. Uncle W. writes to Ld. Granville resigning the Leadership, in a short letter. He says he feels he may fairly retire, after 40 years of public life and at the age of 65, …
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – The upshot is that Uncle W., after much discussion with Lord Granville, and finding that Hartington can’t conscientiously support him, is going to move certain Resolutions…F. is nearly wild. How can he leave Cavendish in the lurch, and yet to be driven to vote against Uncle W. seems almost inconceivable to him.
27Aug1877, Ld. Granville Speaks at Bradford – The Granvilles came Monday, and on Tuesday we had a field-day in honour of the opening of the Liberal Club at Bradford… Ld. Granville as flustered and anxious over the preparation of his two speeches as any new young M.P. Ly. G. sat up writing for him till 1 on Monday night
10Mar1879, Fire at Granville’s – Heard on Monday that the poor Lord Granvilles, while out driving to see Ly. Russell with their children Sunday, had the attic floor of their house burnt! 15 fire-engines put it out and sadly ruined the walls and the rest of the house, but everything moveable was saved, except poor Ly. G.’s best gowns and lace.
19Apr1880, Gladstone Prime Minister Again – On Thursday Hartington was sent for. He and Ld. Granville and Uncle William have, of course, come to an understanding about the leadership among themselves, but Uncle W. had to be dragged up by force on Monday the 12th from Hawarden for the purpose by a letter from Ld. Granville.
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Of course Lord Granville and Hartington had their choice of the leading places; and it is excellent Ld. G. being at the F.O. and Cavendish Indian Secretary…and Spencer is one of Ld. G.’s under-secretaries — he was getting very sick of his dilettante life, and it is a capital thing!
02Aug1880, Gladstone Convalescent – Wednesday morning he insisted on seeing A. Godley and dictating a letter to Ld. Granville on the Irish Disturbance Bill (which was thrown out by the Lords on Tues. by an unheard-of majority, including 60 Liberals ! 51 was the minority).
17Jan1881, London in Snow – The wretched carriage had to drag F. to dine at the Speaker’s, so it took me over to the Granvilles’, where I found I was in for a fearful diplomatic dinner and any amount of French. Sat by the Greek Ambassador and avoided politics!
23Feb1881, Courage to Tackle the Queen – Uncle W. high-gee having gone at the Queen about Ash Wednesday. H.M. had fixed a Council at Windsor for that day at a church-going hour, and neither Althorp [FN: I.e. Lord Spencer] nor Ld. Granville had the courage to tackle her! Uncle W. did, however, with perfect success; H.M. thanking him politely and fixing the hour much later.
04Nov1881, Gladstone’s Thoughts on Resignation – In the 3rd place he said it was only fair to Lord Granville and Hartn., who had led the party thro’ difficult and disagreeable times…When he spoke of Ld. Granville, F. said he had heard on good authority (which he did not quote—it was a letter from Lord Acton to Mazy) that Ld. G. meant to retire whenever Uncle W. did. At this he was greatly surprised; but said he did fear Ld. G.’s life was not a good one.

 

Leveson-Gower, George, 3rd Earl Granville (1872 – 1939)
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – hearing with great philosophy the arrival of Ld. Granville’s son and heir, just announced

 

Leveson-Gower, Grace Grace Emma Townshend (née Abdy)
03Nov1879, Socially Disappointing – Sad departure on Friday, and curious contrast of Chatsworth with Keble! No company here yet but Ly. Albert Gower and her little white mouse of a boy.

 

Leveson-Gower, Ronald
12Mar1869, A Mug from Leveson – Dined at No. 11 with the Great Man and his daughters (Auntie P. and Mazy in bed ! resting) ; he was high-gee a little old Dresden mug given him by Ronald Leveson [FN: Lord Ronald Leveson-Gower, the author and dilettante.], sending for it at dinner to show off, and saying it was the fulfilment of the “dream of his life” to have such a shaped cup

 

Leveson-Gower, Victoria Alberta (1857 – 1953) (Vita) (m: Harold John Hastings Russell)
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – Little Vita Leveson asked her father: “Is it you or Mamma that’s going to give me a little brother?”
01Apr1882, Helped Towards Prettiness – Saturday to Holmbury, meeting Lord Granvilles with their nice little 15-year-old girl Vita [FN: Now Lady Victoria Russell. She married Harold, eldest son of Lord Arthur Russell.] who will be much helped towards prettiness by lovely figure and hair.

 

Liddon, Rev.
01Jul1869, Edward Talbot at Kebel College – The great news of Edward Talbot’s appointment to the Headship of “Keble College” at Oxford is given out now, and is delightful: such a compliment to a man of 25! Mr. Liddon was privately asked to take it, but refused.
27Mar1870, Mr. Liddon’s Sermon – London – B. was in great excitement over Mr. Liddon’s sermon in S. James’ : the crowds to hear him are tremendous.(plus footnote from Editor John Bailey)
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – for Commemoration at Oxford…Mr. Lowe’s name produced uproar and “non placets,” and a shout of laughter when the Chancellor called him “frugalissimus.”
25Jun1872, Maude Herbert Marries Hubert Parry – Canon Liddon’s striking figure and noble voice as he gave the Blessing
29Jun1872, A Golden Day – Liddon preacht a noble sermon
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – One evening we had Dr. Acland and Dr. Liddon and Miss Wordsworth to dinner…Dr. L. said he was in favour of a sensible “Home Rule,” viz., one applying to England and Scotland as well as Ireland, and merely providing that each of the 3 kingdoms should have special Committees for the settling of their own matters.

 

Lightfoot, Joseph Barber
29Apr1873, A New Carriage – then went to S. James Hall and heard an interesting S.P.G. speechification. Ld. Napier dry and John Bull but telling, in his stout defence of missionary work in India. Canon Lightfoot excellent, cheering one up by comparing the progress in given districts with the progress ditto in the third centy, and proving we gained much by the comparison.
03Oct1881, New Marvel: A Telephone – This company, with the addition of the frog Mr. MacColl and great Bp. Lightfoot (who is the image of a toad), made it a notable week, full of interest.

 

Lincoln, Abraham, U.S. president
26Apr1865, President Lincoln is Murdered – Were shocked and aghast beyond measure, Fred especially, at the terrible news of the murder of President Lincoln, placarded in the streets.
01May1865, Commons and Lords Discuss the Murder – heard Sir George Grey move, and Dizzy second, both in very good, suitable speeches, a resolution of sympathy with the United States.
12May1865, Constance Kent Confesses – The Duchess of Argyll was getting signatures to an address of condolence to be sent to Mrs. Lincoln. Lou and I signed it

 

Lind, Jenny, singer
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – A beautiful solemn chorale of the Prince Consort’s was sung, Jenny Lind’s glorious notes ringing above all
08Jul1863, Jenny Lind – I suppose her high notes are a little gone, but the matchless expression and heart-feeling can never go out of her voice

 

Listowel, William Hare, 3rd Earl of Listowel
11Dec1869, Exeunt the Listowels – Exeunt the Listowels, and the “company time” is over ; 3 cheers ! Not that it has not been pleasant, and successful, but 0 to be on one’s own hind legs for 6 weeks !
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

Liverpool, earldom of, see Foljambe

 

Locock
20July1865, No-poperyums – There is much fear that ridiculous old Locock (I only quiz him on this occasion : we owe him a great deal) will beat Sir John Simeon in the Isle of Wight ; folk have the No-poperyums to such a degree.

 

Londonderry, marquessate of, see Stewart, Robert

 

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
15Jan1857, Longfellow’s New Poem – It was about twice too long but delighted me much, from the surpassing beauty of his quotations, occasional grand poetry of his language
01Jul1868, Beautiful Garden Colours – Eastward and westward with Atie. P. With her and her girls at 5 to Holland House, the beautiful gardens very gay with all sorts of wonderful garments…Longfellow was there, I believe, but I didn’t make him out.

 

Longley, Charles Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury
19Apr1866, The Longleys at Lambeth – I drove with old M. to Campden Hill, and to call on the Longleys at glorious old Lambeth which I never saw before.

 

Lorne, Marquess of, see Campbell, John, 9th Duke of Argyll

 

Lothian, marquessate of, see Kerr

 

Louis IV (Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Karl) 4th Grand Duke of Hesse
17Jul1867, The Review for the Sultan – took him on board, and invested him with the ribbon of the Garter there and then, taking it off Prince Louis of Hesse for the purpose.

 

Princess Louise (dau: Queen Victoria) Duchess of Argyll
11Sep1863, Poor Peggies – H.R.H. seems to be rather naughty, with a mischievous will of her own ; draws beautifully
12Sep1863, Beginning to Like Court Life – sent for Horatia, and cried and sobbed at the thoughts of losing her on Monday, after their long bit at Osborne together
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – She has an exceedingly pretty manner, like all the others, compounded of dignity and kindliness
10Jan1864, Missed Second Service – Had tea with Prss. Louise and Pr. Leopold. Evening diversified with ivory letters, as at Windsor.
11Jan1864, Pitying the Royals – Prss. Louise spoke of her father more than once, and mentioned one thing which touched one much… (see Albert, Prince Consort)
16Jan1864, Parkhurst Women Convicts – I rode with Prss. Louise, on Sampson. Prss. Hohenlohe is ill with a feverish cold.
20Apr1869, Windsor Visit Ends – Princess Louise saw me to say good-bye, and so ends my new experience of Court life.
11Jul1870, Breakfast wtih Princess Louise – Princess Louise and Comte de Paris came to breakfast with the Gladstones ; also the famous M. de Lesseps. I went and heard Mrs. Weldon sing beautifully. Sat by Princess Louise who looked very pretty and was charming and well-mannered as usual.
10Nov1870, What Is To Be Done With Rank – Endless are the gossips and conjectures about the future of “Prince and Princess Lorne” : what is to be done with her rank and his ; will she have a “lady” ; will he have a peerage ; will she go after Royal Duchesses ; will he be allowed to go on with politics ? etc., etc.
15Feb1871, Princess Louise’s Dowry – Dined at the George Howards, meeting Granvilles, Amberleys, Minny Labouchere, and young Mr. Sartoris : various M.P.s failed, being kept at the House to hear Mr. Cardwell’s Army Estimates and vote for Princess L.’s dowry, upon which Mr. Taylor thought fit to divide, with the pleasing result of being what the Spectator calls in the “immense minority” of 1—viz., tiresome, obnoxious Mr. Fawcett,
22Mar18871, Reading at Hospital – the Guardian accounts of the wrecked suburbs and wasted lands round Paris ; winding up with the description of “Prince and Princess Lorne’s” marriage in S. George’s Chapel yesterday.
21Sep1874, Driving With the Duchess and Edith Percy – We drove in the woods amid magnificent trees, and ended along the loch to see the yacht appear, which brought home the Lornes and Ld. Percy. Princess Louise very pleasant and easy; seems comfortable with them all.
23Sep1874, Hardly Any Royal Proprieties – We have hardly any Royal proprieties with H.R.H.—an occasional “Mum” from us visitors, and a very feeble pretence at getting up when she comes in late for breakfast, is about all. She seems very much devoted to her husband..
15Dec1880, At Windsor With the Queen – Princess Beatrice a nice creature, pretty from her gentle brightness of expression, and bloom: talked a good deal to me. Gave rather a dismal account of poor Princess Louise who has never recovered from her ghastly sleigh-accident in Canada.
23Feb1881, Courage to Tackle the Queen – Escorted Princess Louise over the Kensington High School; great excitement of all concerned.

 

Princess Louise (dau: Prince/Princess of Wales) Princess Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife (Louise Victoria Alexandra Dagmar
27May1867, Royal Babies – The little Wales Princess is Louise . They were in great alarm for her eyesight at first : something wrong from her mother’s fever ; but it is said to be all right now.
18Apr1869, All the Wales Children – Prince George, however, is hardly pretty, but looks a wag ; Princess Louise a tiny edition of Princess Alice ; and the baby a placid white creature, with prominent bright blue eyes, exactly like the Queen.
13Oct1870, Princess Louise Engaged to Lord Lorne! – The astonishing news came to Emma from her sister May of Lorne’s engagement to Princess Louise!! It is a really good precedent, I do believe ; but, as a first experiment, they had better have chosen somebody with fewer belongings and more money. Fancy Princess Louise with such a tribe of brothers-in-law, one of them a Liverpool merchant! …They are said to be much in love, specially he

 

Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia (m: Prince Arthur)
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage…The bride has a very winning countenance, full of character, yet youthful and innocent-looking: nice dark eyes.

 

Love Denied, Love Fulfilled
15Jun1859, A Torrent of People – Poor Lord Seymour looked very dismal, Ly. Blanche Lascelles, whom his parents wouldn’t let him marry, being engaged to Ld. Boyle
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – D. of Rutland was there, looking most depressed. It is said he has never got over not being allowed to marry his first cousin
29Oct1862, 10 years waiting for a living – eldest Miss Brougham, poor thing, poured out to me all the griefs of her 9 years’ attachment and 1 year’s recognized engagement to their clergyman
29May1865, A Visit to Stafford House – a proposal! Lord Henry Scott [FN: Afterwards 1st Lord Montagu.] to Cissy Wortley . He has loved her for 10 years but her ill-health led to the breaking-off of their engagement. Now it is happily on again.
30May1865, Eddy and Emma Engaged – Of course one is sorry for the 1st cousinship but nothing has been done to lead up to it; and what can one say in such a case of real, tried, and genuine affection, and when everyone has behaved rightly?
28Jun1865, Althorp Pays Uncle Spencer’s Debts – Uncle Spencer has had one of his turf smashes…he is to go abroad for an indefinite time…We much fear that they have settled to live apart, she remaining in England ; so terribly wrong.
26Nov1866, Engagements – Poor squinny dwarfish little Lord Milton is desperately in love with Lady Mary, daughter of Lady Ormonde, who won’t have him.
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – question of a marriage between the Speaker’s nephew and May Lyttelton, and the Speaker had refused to allow it

 

Lowe, Robert, Viscount Sherbrooke
04May1865, Reform Bill and Pre-Raphaeliteism – Mr. Lowe made me agree with him, which is sad, as wicked Radical Fred is all for the £6 franchise. But if Uncle William, as is expected, makes a good rattling speech on the other side, I shall probably go comfortably round.
07Mar1866, Meeting Lowe and Carlyle – We dined at Mr. Bob Lowe’s, which was very pleasant. He is immensely clever, agreeable, and humorous, but rubbed me up the wrong way…introduced to Carlyle who launched into a broad Scotch troll on Reform to F.
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – for Commemoration at Oxford…Mr. Lowe’s name produced uproar and “non placets,” and a shout of laughter when the Chancellor called him “frugalissimus.”
06Aug1873, Government Positions – A notable day, F. being offered a Lordship of the Treasury and thus entering upon official life. Uncle W. takes the Chancellorship of the Exchequer on himself, and F. will be an extra Lord, owing to the double work this will give Uncle W. Mr. Lowe is bowed off the Exchequer of which he has made a grand muddle, and becomes Home Secretary,
20Oct1878, A War With Afghanistan – Morning church at the nice little new church, with a beautiful memorial window to Lady Carnarvon. Bishop preacht excellently on Charity, the spirit that, without imagining good that does not exist, finds it out wherever it is. I hope Mr. Lowe will lay it to heart! absolute cynic that he is.
28Oct1878, Tales of Learning – came away in company with Mr. Lowe, who was highly agreeable. He showed off the spectacles (?) he wears, made of silver, with literal single pin-pricks to see thro’ —thus minimizing the light for his poor pink-onyx albino eyes…
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Oh dear! I have never mentioned how excellently Herbert Gladstone fought thro’ his Middlesex campaign, speaking capitally and winning all hearts, notably Mr. Lowe’s ! ! who fell regularly in love with him.

 

Lowry-Corry, Lord Somerset Richard, 4th Earl Belmore
22Jun1863, So Know All Men – The Belmores came to luncheon

 

Loyd, Samuel Jones, 1st and last Baron Overstone (Lord Overstone)
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – was agreeably surprised, being between E. Neville and extremely agreeable Ld. Overstone
15May1866, Lord Overstone Against All Charities – We dined at the Loyd Lindsays. I sat next Ld. Overstone, who put me into a rage by crowing over his sagacity in snubbing begging-letters. He is choked up with money, and has a monomania against all charities.

 

Loyd-Lindsay, Harriet Sarah (née Loyd) (Lady Loyd-Lindsay, later Lady Wantage)
15May1866, Lord Overstone Against All Charities – We dined at the Loyd Lindsays. [FN: Afterwards Lord and Lady Wantage. Lady Wantage, who inherited Lord Overstone's fortune, had certainly no "monomania against charities."]
17May1867, Out Visiting and a Ball – Drove down to Clapton and Snaresbrook in Mrs. Loyd Lindsay’s carriage. First to the cholera orphanage at Clapton. We went upstairs, and a door being opened, out tumbled a swarm of tiny 5 and 3 and 2 year-old boys, as fresh and clean as pinks, all with outstretched arms to be taken up and hugged
20May1874, A Meeting of Supplemental Ladies – Went with Lady Granville to a little meeting of Supplemental ladies at the Oldfields’, to discuss a little “Steppingstone” Home for little would-be servant gals of low degree. Charlotte Spencer, Mrs. Loyd Lindsay, Ly. Marion Alford, Aunt Yaddy, and other great dames were there.
27Apr1877, A Reading a Mrs. Loyd Lindsay’s – Delightful reading at Mrs. Loyd Lindsay’s by a first-rate Mr. Brandram of “Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

 

Loyd-Lindsay, Robert James, 1st and last Baron Wantage, Brigadier-General
15May1866, Lord Overstone Against All Charities – We dined at the Loyd Lindsays. I sat next Ld. Overstone, who put me into a rage by crowing over his sagacity in snubbing begging-letters. He is choked up with money, and has a monomania against all charities.
07May1872, A Tiring Tea at Buckingham Palace – 5 o’clock tea at Buck. Palace — rather hind-leggy and tiring. The old “Empress of Germany,” horridly painted and curled as she was, pleased me by her long, civil, and feeling speech to the Loyd Lindsays abt the Sick and Wounded Fund. He stood bowing his tall flaxen head, without a word to say of course ! in answer to the flow of compliments.

 

Loyson, Hyacinthe (Père Hyacinthe)
08Dec1869, Personal Infallibility of the Pope – At Rome the Bishops of the Roman Church are mustering for the so-called Œcumenical Council. The Ultramontane Italian party are said to be firmly resolved on decreeing the “personal infallibility of the Pope”—a monstrous new dogma..and one Père Hyacinthe in France ran such a tilt against the Ultramontanes that he has been forced to throw up his position, and has been excommunicated.

 

Lubbock, John, 1st Baron Avebury
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – The upshot is that Uncle W., after much discussion with Lord Granville, and finding that Hartington can’t conscientiously support him, is going to move certain Resolutions conveying all he wished, independent of the front Opposition Bench; Sir John Lubbock will move the “previous question,” and dreadful confusion and ruin of the party accordingly stares us in the face….

 

Lucan, Lord
Nov.1854, The Charge of the Light Brigade – through some mistake of orders, partly from Lord Lucan’s, more from an officer of the name of Nolan’s, fault, a light cavalry brigade was soon charging the Russian army

 

Lucknow, Siege of
14Jan1858, The Siege of Lucknow – We read Inglis’ account of the siege of Lucknow, which will be a great historical name, therefore I need not give details
15Jan1858, Relief of Lucknow – Still more magnificent Sir C. Campbell’s Relief of Lucknow, the whole population of which, garrison, women, children, wounded, and sick, he brought out, unhurt every one.

 

Lyttelton, Albert Victor (her brother)
24Aug1863, Volume 8 of the Diary Begins – teaching the little brothers, Prescott with Arthur, Tasso with Nevy, “Childe Harold” with Albert, Yonge with Bob
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – The girls, Albert, Nevy, and Spencer and I had the treat of going to Birmingham to hear the “Messiah,”
20Jun1865, Our First Real Dinner – received visits from Papa, Aunt Coque, and Albert who also dined with us and is very well
25Feb1873, Shot Albert’s Quondam Tutor – to a special Committee at the House..a rather inaudible duel between Mr. Roby and Sir Michael Hicks Beach. Shot, to my amusement, Albert’s quondam tutor Mr. Richmond, doing Secy. to the Schools Commission.
28May1877, Praise for Gladstone – At Hagley a very odd party received us, viz., Auntie P., Mr. Balfour, Albert, and Mr. Otley the young Keble man lately started as Curate at Hawarden. He was one of the happy Abendberg party, and Albert said was deeply interested in seeing Hagley because of May. Albert had taken him to see the graves and the painted window. Charles turned up after a long day’s farm inspection.
01Jul1878, All 8 Brothers in London – University match; as I couldn’t go in the morning I missed a grand innings of Edward’s, and wouldn’t go in the afternoon. B. Temple came to see me, looking pretty brisk. Old Albert came to sleep, and to-night all 8 brothers are in London: all but Nevy, Spencer, and Bob dined with us.

 

Lyttelton, Alfred (her brother)
07Feb1857, A New Baby – quantities of brown hair and large eyes
27Feb1857, Baby’s Name : Duodecimus? Baby’s name : Duodecimus, or Octavius, though appropriate, have been rejected. Papa dares to think of Frederic. My abomination.
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – He looked lovely in his robes, and Mamma’s wedding-veil
28Sep1858, The Baby – he kisses his hand to wish good-bye, says please
07Feb1861, Alfred Turns Four – his bright generous temper, his amazing winsomeness, his quickness and noble look
05Sep1863, Hereford Cathedral – he liked the Cathedral better even than the dinner, or the uproarious fun in the train
03Nov1863, The Servants’ Ball – In Sir Roger it was pretty to see Charles lift up Alfred that the couples might duck under his little arm
28Jan1865, Advanced to the Stage of Clumsy – Little boys tumbled about with and without skates, and swore friendship with Compton.
19Dec1865, The Little Boys Arrive – Later arrived the 3 little boys, escorted by Newmany, looking famously well ; Bob with a good conduct prize, Edward with one for classics : jolly little Alfred with nothing but his own charms.
26Aug1867, Famous Lyttelton Cricket – Papa, to his infinite delight, caught out the last wicket, and we went in with 151 to get. Alfred’s batting was truly excellent ; his defence being wonderful. They began sending him slow balls out of kindness, but soon found he was up to anything.
09Jan1869, Going Away – Darling Alfred took me to the station ; he turns my head by expressing affection ! and being so sorry I am going, in the most winsome way.
07Feb1871, Alfred Strikes 14 Years Old – Darling Alfred strikes 14 to-day : God bless him. He is wonderfully nice and dear : only too perfect in disposition : the sunbeam that he always was, without a cloud.
03Apr1872, Alfred is Confirmed – Hagley – My darling Alfred was Confirmed at 3 o’clock by the Bp. of Worcester : the last of Mamma’s children has now “put away childish things.” These 15 years of his sunny life have been cloudless, loving, innocent
13Jul1872, Eton Beating Harrow at Cricket – All 8 Lyttelton brothers were on the ground
05Oct1873, Edward’s Vision: An Eton Master – Had the great pleasure of spending the day at Eton with darling old Edward and Alfred….Had luncheon at the White Hart with the boys and walked with them between services in the Park.
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – other hymns which I thought I might repeat to our darling, and I had chosen “There is a green hill far away,” which she so loved to hear Spencer sing — Alfred was playing soft, solemn music, and the pathos of it was bringing floods of tears — when Meriel came down and gently told us the end had come. Not a sound, not a pang: the breathing died away imperceptibly as Uncle B. read the last prayer.
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
09Jul1875, Eton and Harrow Match – The Eton and Harrow match began, but only 35 minutes’ play could be had, because of the torrents of rain. Alfred and Harding went in, and Alf. got over 20 at a great rate, the state of the ground spoiling both bowling and fielding.
10Jul1875, The Last Lyttelton Half at Eton – Six brothers and 8 sisters and their husbands, Mazy, Helen, and G. G., all at Lord’s for the rest of King Alfred’s innings—his last match against Harrow, and this the last Lyttelton half at Eton. This, and the immense blank left by darling May, always such an element during these cricket times, made the day sadly unlike itself. Most of us stayed all day.
09Jan1876, Alfred Visits While Fred Away – Darling King Alfred here thro’ the week shooting and greatly enjoying his dear sunny self. He came of his own accord to read “Q. Mary” with me (Tennyson’s) every evening while F. was away.
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – alked about with F. afterwards and ended at Alfred’s rooms for luncheon. Enjoyed the sight of his beautiful books — presents and prizes, with such loving head-turning inscriptions within! He and we thence to S. Mary’s…F. and Alfred returned for me, and were shown all over the Coll., bedrooms and all ! by one of the students, to their great amusement; but Alfred looked so academic in his cap and gown that it seemed quite the right thing…
01Jul1878, All 8 Brothers in London – University match; as I couldn’t go in the morning I missed a grand innings of Edward’s, and wouldn’t go in the afternoon. B. Temple came to see me, looking pretty brisk…Tues. to Lord’s; Alfred made a grand long innings of 63, and Oxford was pitifully smashed
15Mar1880, H. Gladstone Contests Middlesex – We went on Palm Sunday with Alfred, who came to breakfast, to great S. Paul’s for the glorious full service. Mr. Balfour came to luncheon and tea. Evensong at S. Margaret’s. Canon Farrar preacht a fine sermon on Jonah.
15Feb1881, Training Boys to Honour Women – A strong impulse came over me to write to darling Alfred, now he is in the thick of London life, both social and professional, to beg him to use that sunny influence of his for good in these directions.
16Feb1881, Still Dislikes Matthew Arnold – Thurs., 17th. P.M.W. at Ly. Geo. Hamilton’s. Drum in Gt. Geo. St. Drum at Ly. Reay’s, where I saw Alfred who said such a warm, loving word of thanks for my letter.

 

Lyttelton, Arthur Temple (her brother)
07Apr1859, Over Clent Hill – asking all manner of questions about macadamized roads
07Jan1862, Little Arthur – just struck 10, frank, sweet-tempered, full of fun and intelligence
22Feb1862, Arthur a page – Arthur is gazetted as Page to the Queen
08Jun1863, A Page-of-Honour – with Papa to see Arthur in his Court costume for the levee
24Aug1863, Volume 8 of the Diary Begins – teaching the little brothers, Prescott with Arthur, Tasso with Nevy, “Childe Harold” with Albert, Yonge with Bob
19Sep1863, Reading Shakespeare – Began “Henry VIII” with Arthur who likes both poetry in general and Shakespeare in particular
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – I had a famous ride to Kinver Edge with Spencer and Arthur. I rode the Maid, and jumped clean over a gap, successfully.
06Feb1866, The Queen Opens Parliament – Arthur, to his great delight, was in waiting, and arrayed himself here, which gave much enjoyment to our household ! According to his report, the Queen wore pale lilac (qu. grey ?) silk,
09Jul1870, Eton Cricket – the Eton 2nd innings was scrubby, all but the 1st 4 scores, and Harrow had 136 to get; really beautiful fielding of Eton (Arthur at long-leg one of the best) had a good deal to do with it ; 6 men were caught out. One bowler (Tollemache) was good ;their fielding, Papa would say, was “fishy.”
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
19Feb1877, Dear Hon. and Rev. Arthur – Dear Hon. and Rev. Arthur [FN: Her brother Arthur was a curate at Reading at this time] met me on the platform, walked me about the town (mem. quite the finest new town-hall I have ever seen), gave me an excellent luncheon in his snug lodgings all be-booked and be-pictured…
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – The Master came up, and was most kind and cordial; delighted us beyond by saying that he would have given the Hulsean Essay Prize to Arthur, who was so nearly successful as to be printed full length as “prox accessit” or whatever the sayin’ is. Likewise said the Master that he greatly regretted Arthur’s not getting the Fellowship, for which he was better suited, in every respect but pure learning, than the man who got it.
27Jan1879, Arthur to be First Master at Selwyn – I had the grand excitement of being the first to tell them of a great piece of news just sent me by Arthur himself, viz., of his having been offered the headship of the new “Selwyn College” at Cambridge, which is to be opened in about 2 years.
02Aug1880, Gladstone Convalescent – Arthur and Kathleen’s [FN: brother Arthur married Kathleen Clive, younger sister of his father's second wife.] wedding—to think of my having to squeeze it in!!

 

Lyttelton, Caroline Lavinia (Aunt Coque)
30Dec1858, The Ball at Stourbridge – chaperoned by Papa and Aunt Coque
14Jun1862, The Queen’s Duty to Her Subjects – Also At. Coque, the Duke of Argyll, and the Miss Dicksons (such an odd party!) came to luncheon
08Sep1863, Summoned to Windsor – I tore off to Stourbridge with Gielen and At. C. and bought silk, etc., for two black gowns
16Sep1863, Sedate Pleasures – At. Coque, Lavinia, and May set out for “Orchard Neville” (late Baltonsborough) en route for Antony
11May1864, The Queen’s Second Court – I had a snug visit in my room at B. Palace from At. C. and the girls. At. C. brought me a lovely little ring with a pearl cross.
20May1865, Dined at Lord Wharncliffe’s – Had a flying visit from Aunt Coquitty. [FN: I.e. her aunt, Miss Lyttelton ("Aunt Coque"), and her cousin, Miss Kitty Pole Carew, who were much together.]
23Jun1865, Granny Reads a Picture Book – To St. St., where Great-Granny was entertaining with a picture-book little George and Mary. Dined there, and chaperoned Aunt C. afterwards to Ly. Windsor’s.
12Feb1869, Coursing in the Park – Coursing came off in the mosses and the park ; Ld. R., Margaret, and I drove with Aunt Coque in the sociable, and the fat cockney coachman got so excited that he drove us down impossible places over the grass, to Aunt Coque’s delight and Uncle Dick’s terror.
06Mar1876, The Queen Opens a Grocers’ Wing – With Ly. Robartes and At. Coque to L. Hospital to see the Queen open the “Grocers’ Co. wing.” … The Q. very punctual : stood rather grim and glum on her platform, but at the right moments, when she did bow and smile and make those incomparable curtseys of hers, was, in spite of her little dowdy black bonnet, as Queen-like and gracious as ever.
19Apr1876, Papa Ends His Life – It has been God’s will to send us a terrible anguish. On Monday morning came from Aunt Coque a sadly disheartening account of dear Papa. The latter days of the week before last we all saw hopeful symptoms, especially in his looks and also in his diminished restlessness, and power of occupying himself for longer times together…

 

Lyttelton, Charles George, 8th Viscount Cobham (her brother)
25Mar1857, Eton – in the heat of a game of fives
24May1858, Charles’ Innings – against the best bowler at Eton, and got 57 runs, and 13 later
26May1858, Charles’ Noble Play – mentioned in the Morning Post as some of the best ever seen!
11Apr1861, A Dance With the King of France – Charles was quite the handsomest man there
07Jun1862, Volume 7 of the Diary Begins – then set off, 1st, to Charles’ rooms, where he was not, then all about the lovely “Backs.”
08Jun1862, To Trinity With Papa – Walked abt. the Backs afterwds with Charles, meeting the Argylls, Messrs. Wade (with a lovely tenor voice), Hudson (an unparalleled fiddler), Hofman
28Jun1862, Three Day Cricket Match – Charles got 57 his 2nd innings in perfectly faultless style, and Papa had the famous luck to see most of it
24Sep1862, Charles bags 12 stags – safe and sound, thank God, in a most splendid state of health and vigour, and having killed 12 stags, more than anybody else
25Sep1862, Horrid Knickerbockers – Charles went out shooting, in horrid knickerbockers.
11Apr1863, The Valse – I have mastered the Scotch reel, and Charles has fairly learnt to valse
04Jul1863, May Has Scarlet Fever – get more than 20 runs in most beautiful style ; getting a lovely cut for 4, first ball, and a square leg hit for 3 the next
18Sep1863, Sankoo – Busy most of the morning going over the rooms with Elly : we shall be 30 in the house, besides servants, for Charles’ 21st birthday
27Oct1863, Charles Turns 21 – then dear old Charles got up, and stood for some minutes while everybody cheered him. He did look grand
28Oct1863, More Celebrations – Chs. responded in another excellent little speech
29Oct1863, A Gentlemen’s Dinner – praise of Charles’ speech (saying he had the making of a good speaker, which I note down for the benefit of futurity)
30Oct1863, The Tenants’ Dinner – Charles wisely took the facetious line, as it was plain enough the stolid party wd have been entirely unmoved by any expressions of feeling
02Nov1863, A Dinnery Given by the Gentry – only poor old Charles at last made one recollect that it was his 7th speech on the subject, and hesitated a little
03Nov1863, The Servants’ Ball – In Sir Roger it was pretty to see Charles lift up Alfred that the couples might duck under his little arm
22May1865, Charles and Willy Might Stand – Dear old Charles dined with us : a proposal has been made to put him up for the county against Messrs. Knight and Lygon,
22Nov1865, Dudley Marries Moncrieffe – Yesterday Lord Dudley married Miss Georgina Moncrieffe, a beautiful girl under 20. Charles was best man ! but must have looked more like the bridegroom.
17Apr1866, Charles a Horrid Old Tory Still – Charles dined with us ; he is immensely interested in the political crisis, and seems to weigh all sides ; but I fear he is a horrid old Tory still : he don’t commit himself much.
27Jun1867, Hearing Dean Magee at the Abbey – Nevy and I went to an S.P.G. service at the Abbey and heard Dean Magee again…washstand for Charles whom we have actually encamped in one of the pretty bright rooms that we hoped to see gladdened with faces of our little children.
18May1868, Antidisestablishmentarianism – Lord Dudley danced with me, and I tried to coax him round about Charles, but he is in horror about Disestablishment, and I fear can only be expected not to oppose actively. The clergy are against it as one man nearly, and will take up the perilous, suicidal ground of making the English and Irish Establishments stand or fall together.
29May1868, Charles Reelected – Uncle Spencer came at 8, announcing VICTORY. Charles and F. followed shortly in a waggonette, pursued by 2 costermongers’ carts at full speed, and a rout of dirty little boys, ooray, singing, tin kettles, and all the rest of it.
30May1868, Electionums – Talked incessant electionums; it seems the enemy has been outrageously base and unscrupulous, spending shoals of money among the poor ignorant Black-country people, putting about all sorts of lies, and generally disgracing themselves ; also having 100 paid agents to Charles’s 20.
23Aug1870, The Tiny Boys and the Gentlemen – William is to be seen taking Charles round the leg to hurry him (sanguine !). Pleasant Brass Castle day, with one drive to see : I went with Charles and saw him kill 20 birds out of 22 shots : never firing his 2nd barrel once at the same bird.
26Aug1870, He Killed Them As He Sat – Bolton – Luncheon at the gate before you quite get to the Roggan House. I saw Charles shoot 37 birds in one drive. He got 2 out of a pack that flew at him, as he was comfortably sitting with his back to the wall. He killed them as he sat.
30Aug1871, Shooting at Bolton – Dear old Charles went, having killed 1,000 birds all but 4…August 30th, 1871.—Poor Cavendish is not in good shooting trim after his endless grind in London and Ireland, and left off after luncheon.
06Feb1873, Parliament Open, Charles Speaks – Parlt. opened (alas ! no Queen) ; old Charles moved the address, capitally well in expression and matter, and only a trifle too stiff in manner.
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – F. was busy all the morning between Harley Street and Devonshire House, and Ld. Granville and others confabulated also with Hartington. All was arranged, and Charles and I went off to Wellington College immensely relieved ; F. settling not to come till Sunday morning in case he might be wanted.
06May1877, Gladstone Speech after Pandemonium – The gentlemen and I all walked to Eversley; Charles and I being much agog to see Kingsley’s Church and home, after reading his noble life.
28Aug1878, Little Mary Cavendish – Mazy wrote me a dear letter full of littleMary Cavendish’s excellencies. [FN: Her eldest brother Lord Lyttelton, who became 8th Viscount Cobham in 1889, had just become engaged to Mary Cavendish, daughter of the 2nd Baron Chesham.]
19Oct1878, Charles Gets Married – Charles’s wedding-day a golden day within and without! The Keble couple, Sybella and Sal, Auntie P. and Mazy, went to Latimer Friday…
27Nov1880, Gentle, Humble, and Considerate – Latimer – To Latimer, where I had the joy of finding Charles and Mary and that nice young person Maud. She has a darling face with fine dark blue eyes. . . .The descriptions of Rosalind’s [FN: Wife of the 9th Earl of Carlisle.] manners and customs at Castle Howard make one despair of her ever knowing how to be gentle, humble, or considerate; and yet she is kind and affectionate.
24Oct1881, Charles Has a Son – Dear old big brother wrote me word of a son-and-heir with a hooked nose being born on Sunday the 23rd. A great event to us ! The little fellow is born with that most blessed of heritages—the good and noble examples of three generations of his name.

 

Lyttelton, Edward (her brother) (Head Master of Eton)
23Jul1855, A Seventh Son – Thank God, oh ! thank God ! to-day at 4 p.m. came into the world No. 11, a seventh son
26Apr1856, After the Ball – M. acknowledges that when she saw us set off, she and Edward agreed that they would have liked to go. She is such an odd old creature
27Jan1865, Skating with Great Enjoyment – The dear little boys [FN: Her brothers Edward and Alfred.] came about 5, had tea with Newmany in our room, appeared at dinner, and behaved with great aplomb.
13Jul1872, Eton Beating Harrow at Cricket – All 8 Lyttelton brothers were on the ground
19Dec1865, The Little Boys Arrive – Later arrived the 3 little boys, escorted by Newmany, looking famously well ; Bob with a good conduct prize, Edward with one for classics : jolly little Alfred with nothing but his own charms.
23Jul1867, Birthdays – Birthday of little Edward and of Cavendish [FN: Her brother Edward and her brother-in-law, Lord Harlington]. I wrote to the former, and sent the latter a little gift of Hymns Ancient and Modern for his pocket.
05Oct1873, Edward’s Vision: An Eton Master – Had the great pleasure of spending the day at Eton with darling old Edward and Alfred….Had luncheon at the White Hart with the boys and walked with them between services in the Park. Talked with Edwd. of his vision of being an Eton master…Got home to dinner, and entertained Uncle W. and Willy; Uncle W. agog upon perversions;
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – She lay a little propped up, breathing gently; her look was a little troubled. Auntie P. was on the bed at her right side, stroking the wavy hair; Newmany holding her left hand, close to me; poor Edward also near me, watching her earnestly. Auntie P. said, “It’s all right, darling; God is taking such care of you,” and she told me to say some verses.
01Jul1878, All 8 Brothers in London – University match; as I couldn’t go in the morning I missed a grand innings of Edward’s, and wouldn’t go in the afternoon. B. Temple came to see me, looking pretty brisk. Old Albert came to sleep, and to-night all 8 brothers are in London: all but Nevy, Spencer, and Bob dined with us.
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Saturday we went to Wellington College and our political gossip was highly appreciated by the Wickhams and Edward (brother). Said brother is doing stop-gap master’s work, and intensely enjoying it: delightful to hear Edward Wickham’s strong approval of him.

 

Lyttelton, Emily (née Pepys) (Aunt Emmy) (m: Uncle Billy)
15Aug1854,Uncle Billy Engaged – By the bye, she is Miss Pepys, daughter of the Bishop of Worcester. A very worthy person I believe
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – Mr. Selfe, Althorp, and Aunt Emmy were godparents
09Sep1863, A Bewitching Linsey – I drove with At. E. and May to Stourbridge, and falling in love with a bewitching linsey
18Sep1863, Sankoo – Played at billiards with At. E. and afterwards walked parochially with her
21Nov1863, Billiards – At. E. turned up at 1 for an inauguration game of billiards on the newly cloth’d table in the hall
22Dec1864, A Begging Errand – I wrote to Cavendish!!! on a small begging errand of Mrs. Otley’s. Played billiards with Aunt E. and beat her.

 

Lyttelton, George William Spencer, (Spencer, her brother)
22Dec1855, An Enchanting House – schoolroom (for the studies of M., Georgy, [FN: Her fourth brother, after wards always known as Spencer] Winny, and me
25Jul1856, George Becomes Spencer – Uncle Fritz (4th Earl Spencer) gives an estate in New Zealand
21Apr1857, Nevy and Spencer ..went back to Geddington ; niobissimus, poor, dear, old fellows.
20Aug1858, A Ride to Kinver Edge – a stirring fresh breeze, all fragrant with heath, the horses enjoying it as much as we
12Jul1863, Last London Sunday – Spencer got 10 runs 2nd innings, and he and Nevy got 6 wickets between them
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – I had a famous ride to Kinver Edge with Spencer and Arthur. I rode the Maid, and jumped clean over a gap, successfully.
13May1864, Good-byes are Sad Matters – My old boys Spencer and Arthur [FN: Then at Eton.] came to see me ; Nevy, not being well, could not, alas!
02Jul1867, A Monster Cavalcade of Swells – We saw the 5th Oxford wicket go down (2nd innings) for 124, and shook in our shoes ; but the remaining wickets went down fast, and Cambridge went in with 110 to get. This was done with 5 wickets to go down, Spencer taking his bat for 20.
23Jun1868, Spencer Bowed Out of the Eleven – We are all in a frightful temper, Spencer having been bowed out of the 11 before the Oxford and Cambridge match, for not playing lately in “good form.” He bears it with matchless philosophy ; but Papa says, “Such a thing has never happened to a son of mine before,” and would have sunk under the trial, if he had not quite recovered his spirits and health.
02Jun1869, Dined Dullissimus Major – Workhouse with Lavinia. Spencer breakfasts every morning with us. We had some snug reading, and went together at 5 to the R. Academy in its fine new rooms. Some good Millais and Landseers.
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – other hymns which I thought I might repeat to our darling, and I had chosen “There is a green hill far away,” which she so loved to hear Spencer sing — Alfred was playing soft, solemn music, and the pathos of it was bringing floods of tears — when Meriel came down and gently told us the end had come. Not a sound, not a pang: the breathing died away imperceptibly as Uncle B. read the last prayer.
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
26Jul1875, Spencer on World Tour – One of these days we bade dear old Spencer good-bye, as he is going to Hagley, en route for Liverpool, New York, California, Australia, New Zealand, and India with Balfour. Oh dear !
28May1877, Praise for Gladstone – Tues. F. and I escorted Mazy and Spencer to Hardwick, driving with ducal horses to Chesterfield and posting thence. Very glorious day, in spite of many showers. Hardwick inside and out, and on its roof, enchanting.
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Of course Lord Granville and Hartington had their choice of the leading places; and it is excellent Ld. G. being at the F.O. and Cavendish Indian Secretary…and Spencer is one of Ld. G.’s under-secretaries — he was getting very sick of his dilettante life, and it is a capital thing!

 

Lyttelton, George William, 4th Baron Lyttelton (Papa)
20Dec1855, Papa’s Lecture on Shakespeare – Oh, it was so beautiful, and such quotations, and he read them so grandly too.
29May1856, Her Majesty’s Birthday – Things addressed to our carriage due to his cocked hat
25Jul1856, George Becomes Spencer – a whole son taken off Papa’s hands
07Feb1857, A New Baby – what in the world shall we do with another boy
30Jun1857, The Brichtzka – a horse named Oenone, viewing Papa’s beautiful translation of that poem, just printed
21Sep1858, Going Out On Visits – taking care for us, and fetching us to go down with him
30Dec1858, The Ball at Stourbridge – I think he enjoyed seeing us dancing
11Jan1859, Papa Lectures on New Zealand – beautiful allusion to the cloud over his life, which he likes to speak of
18May1859, Journey to London – Papa the complexion of a stoker, having faced wind, rain, and dirt on the box
28May1859, Opera at Covent Garden – There being no ballet, Papa let us go.
07Jun1859, The Opening of Parliament – The peers kept dropping in in their red robes, Papa looked vey comical
06Jul1859, Wimbledon – Papa coming to see the place where he lived so much in his childhood
02Jul1861, Cricket and a Comet – Papa deep in “The Woman in White”
06Jan1862, Regal Duties Alone – Papa wrote a beautiful address of condolence for the county
23Jan1862, 200 Hartley Colliers Found Dead – Atie. Pussy managed to get Papa’s beautiful thing in the Parish Magazine shown to the Queen who liked it
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – Papa in his glory on a gigantic, powerful creature called Shamrock more than 16 hds high, rode over everything
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – Papa to play chess with Mrs. Morton
08Feb1862, Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Papa and Althorp and Major Reilly hunted and had a good run in spite of a sharp frost
11Feb1862, Kidderminster Volunteer Ball – Papa in uniform, a guard of honour (rifles) received us : rather blowing
01Apr1862, Odd party at dinner – ..darling Nevy for his Confirmation to-morrow. Papa went away for it.
21Apr1862, Choir Surplices – A volunteer sham battle went off with éclat : Papa in full red figg on the hunter
10May1862, Gread London Exhibition – No opera as it has a ballet attached, in which case Papa doesn’t like me to go, even when one doesn’t stay
07Jun1862, Volume 7 of the Diary Begins – Papa is always a lion, which is charming.
08Jun1862, To Trinity With Papa – Dined at 5, then went with Papa to Trinity
09Jun1862, Red Letter Day at Cambridge – the 1st name that was cheered was Papa’s!
26Jun1862, A Full Day – he was almost overcome when describing the poor people who come to the House when at the last extreme of distress
11Jul1862, Last London Day – Dined with Papa at Ld. George Quin’s, wherewith Ends My London Gaieties
22Jul1862, Butterer and Butteree – Came with Papa to Canon Wood’s, Worcester, for the Archaeological Society’s doings
18Sep1862, Papa has a tooth out – Papa has had an enormous tooth out, under choloroform
17Oct1862, First Visit to The Lakes – Papa and I left Hagley at 10 1/2, and arrived at Windermere, joining Uncle Stephen
22Oct1862, A glorious day of beauty – violent storm caught Papa sitting like Pillicock on the top! which he reached triumphantly
26Nov1862, Papa whistles – I heard Papa whistle (softly and half to himself) for the 1st time since ’57
23Dec1862, Papa’s lecture on poetry – it was to me enjoyment only next to listening to mighty music, and I am in a realm of beauty and harmony
17May1863, Dirty Gloves – Papa has walked me home. Not having been once on wheels, I must have walked about 7 miles.
19Jun1863, A Maid-of-Honour!!!!!!! – But! £400 a year! I shall be more than off his hands
25Jun1863, Stage Stories from Charles Kean – I received the last quarterly allowance I shall ever receive from Papa’s poor pinched pocket
02Jul1863, A Northern Yankee – Beautiful select concert at the Aumales’ to which Papa and I went, kindly lifted by Lord Harrowby
12Jul1863, Last London Sunday – Went with Papa and Charles to the John St. Chapel to hear Mr. Brookfield, who preacht
03Aug1863, Energetic Duty – Papa went off to night to sleep 4 hours at Chester, thence to Birmingham for breakfast, thence to the Board of Guardians
26Sep1863, Mobs and Riots – there is an impression on both our minds of a bludgeon ; not unnaturally, as Papa was a Special Constable
27Oct1863, Charles Turns 21 – One word about Papa, “not that I can hope to emulate him, for who could?”
03Nov1863, The Servants’ Ball – Papa made them all a little speech, thanking them warmly for all their good feeling and heartiness
30Nov1863, A Weary Evening – Railway Hotel, Derby – A very interesting story: we got to Derby at 7.40 instead of 6.20. No Papa ! And there we sat till past 10
05Dec1863, Viewing Hardwicke – Papa and I drove with the Duke and Ly. Louisa to Hardwicke where we spent 2 hours going over the wonderful old house
25Feb1864, A Decision by the Privy Council – and likely to compromise the Church, but Papa and others take the more reasonable line of viewing it as what it is—a mere legal acquittal
02Mar1864, Miss Merlet is Dismissed – Papa went to Worcester for 2 nights, which fact is the prelude to one of our many small but unpleasant catastrophes : his letter of dismissal to Miss Merlet
24Apr1864, Visiting the Duke – Papa and he came after breakfast, and I went with them to Tennyson’s Chapel, where we received the Holy Communion together.
11May1864, The Queen’s Second Court – I sat with Papa for the 1st part, shooting F. before very long coming into the room, looking very nice in uniform
24May1864, Luncheon at Devonshire House – At Dev. House, Papa turned up and gave me a beautiful large gold cross, in which I shall have his dear hair and Mamma’s.
05Jun1864, Gifts from Papa – On the transverse, my new name, which I can’t yet write ; then : “From her loving Father, June 7th, 1864. In Memory and in Hope.”
04Aug1864, Fred Doing the Agreeable – Dinner party … : too mad Papa hooking me in to dinner, Granny making the “moving bow” to me
21Apr1865, I am Still Happier Now – I spent a good deal of time thinking over my last 21st of April…Papa coming in with his dear bright smile, and Auntie P and Uncle William ; Lou coming to see me
24Oct1865, Old Accounts of Wellington’s Death – I looked through the newspaper accounts of the Duke of Wellington’s funeral…so clearly remember Papa … to tell us of the Duke’s death, and Mamma writing to us about the funeral
16May1866, Milman, Fawcett, Ecce Homo – The new book which is making the most wonderful noise—”Ecce Homo”—was discussed… Papa and Uncle Wm. are of the latter opinion : I long to read it but the Talbots dissuade me.
06Nov1866, Agonistes into Greek – I am copying the text of Samson Agonistes for Papa who has translated it into Greek.
25Jun1867, A Smart Gown of High Fashion – I with Papa to the Royal Ball, where I danced with Althorp ! Wore a smart yellow gown of high fashion ; clinging to one’s hips, perfectly flat in front and magnificently tailed behind.
01Aug1867, Kick-up in the H. of Lords – I have never stayed in London straight on into August before ; it is owing to the kick-up in the H. of Lords….There have been other amendments, including an unlucky one of Papa’s, that nobody should vote who could not write a legible hand. The joke against him was that the clerk had to ask him to read the amendment, as he could not decipher it !
21Aug1867, Papa’s Episcopate Bill – The idiotic Peers have thrown out Papa’s episcopate Bill as it came up from the Commons, because they won’t have Bishops without a seat in the H. of Lords. It is a true, bitter criticism on this, that it is clear the wretched Peerage is the valuable thing about a Bishop !
23Jun1868, Spencer Bowed Out of the Eleven – We are all in a frightful temper, Spencer having been bowed out of the 11 before the Oxford and Cambridge match, for not playing lately in “good form.” He bears it with matchless philosophy ; but Papa says, “Such a thing has never happened to a son of mine before,” and would have sunk under the trial, if he had not quite recovered his spirits and health.
27Apr1869, Papa is Engaged – It was a day of a great event ; Papa’s engagement to Mrs. Mildmay, née Clive, was settled. I have said nothing about this before in my journal, but for months some of us have known and thought about it ; and now, thank God, we can all feel thankful that it has been brought to pass.
10Jun1869, Papa and Sybella are Married – Papa and Sybella were married at her parents’ place, Perrystone in Herefordshire.
28Jun1869, The Queen’s Garden Party – The Queen held a breakfast… Papa and Sybella were there; how it is one takes that so calmly I can’t tell, but so it is. The 2 new romances swallow it up, and it is restful to see Papa so happy and peaceful.
31Mar1870, Papa’s Turns 53 – Papa 53. Meriel and I have clubbed to give him an arm-chair for his office,[FN: Lord Lyttelton was Chief Commissioner of Endowed Schools.] which the stingy Government don’t allow him.
12May1870, Another Baby for Papa – A little half-sister was born to the poor old dozen at Cavendish Sq. this morning — 30 years after May (sic, Meriel was 30). Sybella was frightfully ill, and the poor little thing suffered much in the birth, but all went well, and she is comfortable. It is rather a pretty little baby. [FN: Sarah Kathleen, now Mrs. John Bailey. (editor of the diary)]
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – Papa was received very well, considering he is Cambridge; the Speaker (odd to say) came next him in the procession and they sat together and made friends, after the long estrangement. [FN: There had been question of a marriage between the Speaker's nephew and May Lyttelton.]..asked to speak to May; to whom he just said, “I wished to shake your hand.” It deeply touched and pleased the poor child.
09Jul1870, Eton Cricket – really beautiful fielding of Eton (Arthur at long-leg one of the best) had a good deal to do with it ; their fielding, Papa would say, was “fishy.” Said Papa stalked off at the end of the Eton 2nd innings, when Arthur took his bat for only 5 (including a good hit for 3), thinking defeat inevitable.
08Jul1871, Lord Tennyson: Rat-Taily Hair – I partook of no less than 3 teas : Sir J. Lefevre’s, Auntie P.’s at Downing Street, and Charlotte Spencer’s to Ly. Superintendents. At Downing Street I was introduced to Tennyson, a dirty man with opium-glazed eyes and rat-taily hair hanging down his back. He asked if Papa still translated…
22Feb1872, Handsome and Love-lorn Hubert Parry – Dined at Portl. Pl. [FN: Her father's house.], meeting Ly. A. Compton, Helen Gladstone, Mr. Strutt, the handsome and love-lorn Hubert Parry
25Feb1873, Shot Albert’s Quondam Tutor – Went with old M. to a special Committee at the House in hopes of hearing Papa examined about Endowed Schools…
01Sep1873, A Monster Expedition to Wrekin – Papa headed a monster expedition to the top of the Wrekin. It consisted of himself and Sybella, his 8 sons, 3 of his daughters, 2 sons-in-law, a grandson, 3 cousins (Pole Carews), a niece (G. G.), and Mr. Balfour…
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – I kissed her hand, and we went away. Dr. Wade could not tell how long it might last, so we went down again to be with poor Papa and Sybella. They were setting off to go up the Hill and I was sitting in the Library, looking out other hymns which I thought I might repeat to our darling,..
15May1875, Wales Children Like Anybody Else – Saturday the 15th I came to Chatsworth with Papa and Sybella; F. having gone down Friday, when I stayed on to go with M., Mrs. T., Gertrude, and Willy to hear “S. Paul” at Exeter Hall, which was glorious. Endless dawdling journey.
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
10Jul1875, The Last Lyttelton Half at Eton – Six brothers and 8 sisters and their husbands, Mazy, Helen, and G. G., all at Lord’s for the rest of King Alfred’s innings—his last match against Harrow, and this the last Lyttelton half at Eton. This, and the immense blank left by darling May, always such an element during these cricket times, made the day sadly unlike itself. Most of us stayed all day.
19Apr1876, Papa Ends His Life – It has been God’s will to send us a terrible anguish. On Monday morning came from Aunt Coque a sadly disheartening account of dear Papa. The latter days of the week before last we all saw hopeful symptoms, especially in his looks and also in his diminished restlessness, and power of occupying himself for longer times together…
24Apr1876, Thoughts of Papa – F. and I stayed on at Hagley. Sybella most touching in the absolute unselfishness and patience with which she bears her great grief: she has constant tears to relieve her, and clings to his children, and turns to the religious thoughts and words which were the “strength of his life,” to comfort her in his death…
31Jul1876, Improvements to Althorp Estate – with Papa, in 1863, when he hunted with great enjoyment on a famous hunter of Spencer’s called Pale-Ale, and affronted Spencer by blaming the horse for refusing a brook. “My dear George, you rode him at it with a loose rein—you never put his head at it!” “Well, all I know is, my old hunter would have gone over it if I had put his tail at it!
11Dec1876, Comments on Gladstone – Uncle W., in spite of hankering after his tree-cutting, was inveigled into walks…I don’t know anyone who strikes one as happier; sorrows don’t take the spring out of him, and he finds constant delight in all his work and interests; his strong steadfast religion (like Papa’s) underlying and shining thro’ his whole character.
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – The Master came up, and was most kind and cordial; delighted us beyond by saying that he would have given the Hulsean Essay Prize to Arthur, who was so nearly successful as to be printed full length as “prox accessit”…Oh, how my mind turned at once to darling daddy! it seems as if I must tell him.
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – Afterwards we both with M. went to see the recumbent figure of Papa by Forsyth for Worcester Cathedral. It is a fine thing, and has much likeness, tho’ Forsyth never saw him.
27Jan1879, Arthur to be First Master at Selwyn – I had the grand excitement of being the first to tell them of a great piece of news just sent me by Arthur himself…0 what it is not to have Papa, May, or Mrs. Talbot, or At. Emy, to tell!

 

Lyttelton, Henrietta, (née Cornewall) (Aunt Henrietta) (m: Uncle Spencer Lyttelton)
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – Charlotte and At. Henrietta pounced upon me, and practised many experiments on my hair
08Feb1862, Spencer’s Fairy Queen – At. Henrietta, Tallee and I, all in powdered hair twined back over a high “pelote,” with lace handkerchief at top
01Jul1862, Powdered Hair – At. Henrietta had an approximation to it; only her powder was brown, which simply looks dirty
28Jun1865, Althorp Pays Uncle Spencer’s Debts – one doesn’t know how she has the heart to go out ; for Uncle Spencer has had one of his turf smashes, and though kind, good Althorp has paid, he is to go abroad for an indefinite time

 

Spencer, Henry (son of Uncle Spence L.)
27Jun1866, Uncle W. and Auntie P. are Cheered – where Granny was entertaining her great-grandchildren, helped very pleasantly by Harry Lyttelton, who seems to have much that is nice about him : is more like his mother, to look at and to listen to, than ever.

 

Lyttelton, Hester Margaret (her sister) (m: Cyril Argentine Alington)

 

Lyttelton, Lavinia (her sister, Winnie) see Talbot, Lavinia

 

Lyttelton, Lavinia (sister of George, 4th Baron) see Glynn, Lavinia

 

Lyttelton, Lady Mary, (née Glynne) (Mamma)
22Jul1855, Mamma’s Birthday – The 22nd was my own, own, precious Mamma’s birthday… which day also Mamma went up to London for her eleventh confinement. God bring her safe through it!
23Jul1855, A Seventh Son – baby Edward is little and thin but prosperous, as is his Mamma, thank God !
22Dec1855, An Enchanting House – Next to it is Papa’s and Mamma’s room… and next to them a bedroom for two maids.
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – Her Majesty shook hands with me! and then turning to Auntie Pussy: “And your sister, where is she?”
20Jul1856, Mr. Arnold Again – Moreover, he recommended Mamma to go to a dissenting chapel to hear some wonderful ” preacher “
07Feb1857, A New Baby – the danger more awful than we knew
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – Mamma came to church, so nice.
23Apr1857, Convalescence at Brighton – A short visit by Mrs. Talbot
04Jun1857, Confirmation – I had Papa on one side, Mamma on the other
08Jun1857, Our Last Day – Papa and Mamma in the pony carriage
19Jun1857, Mamma’s Drive – a drive in the Robins’ carriage : a most acceptable loan, view our deficiency of vehicle
30Jun1857, The Brichtzka – Our coach-horses! took Mamma out in the brichtzka for the first time
13Aug1857, The Soul-light On Her Face – It is of no use—God has set His seal. She speaks about it, and the soul-light on her face makes her wonderful to look at
17Aug1857, Mamma Dies – it’s all over, all left behind ; the Everlasting Morning has dawned on the short weary night
24Jun1859, Those Old Times – memories of Mamma, so pale and lovely, with one of our own sweet babies ; and the happy quietness of those old times
29Jul1859, Home at Hagley – look at Mamma’s beautiful E. window, shining thro’ darkness, as the thought of her does, in all that happens
26Oct1863, Mrs. Gladstone in Mama’s Room – Atie. Pussy is in the dear room, never used till now since the night when Mamma rested there in her arms
28Oct1863, More Celebrations – Oh, darling Mammie, you may have looked down upon him ! you may have been praying for him
22Apr1864, Telling Mamma About It – I wore the locket to-night, hanging it to darling Mamma’s little pearl chain. It felt to me as if I was telling her about it.
28Jul1865, Idle But Moving Thoughts – moving thoughts cross one from time to time, of how it would please and interest darling Mamma to come down to us again for a little while, just to see the changes; which, thank God, have been mostly such happy ones.
16Oct1865, A Visit to Castle Howard – Castle Howard of which I have heard so much especially since Lord Carlisle’s death… His life seems to have been one of those that gilds all the lives among which it is cast, as Mamma’s and Aunt Lavinia’s did.
24Oct1865, Old Accounts of Wellington’s Death – I looked through the newspaper accounts of the Duke of Wellington’s funeral…so clearly remember Papa … to tell us of the Duke’s death, and Mamma writing to us about the funeral
15Nov1865, Trevelyan’s ‘Cawnpore’ – I can remember, even in the midst of our own great grief in the autumn of 1857, the frightful heart-rending news from India, and specially the massacre of women and children : the outcries for vengeance, and the day of humiliation.
11Dec1866, Lady Fortescue Dies – A terribly sad thing has happend : the death of Lady Fortescue in her confinement, leaving 13 children, the eldest only 18. It takes me back to ’57, and awakes in me afresh the sense of what a piteous thing it is—so many orphaned.
30Jun1867, Wedding Ring Off for First Time – Have just been much put about by discovering I had unbeknown pulled off my wedding-ring for the very first time. Made my Fred put it on again, as I remember Mamma used to make Papa.
17Aug1867, Remembering Mother – The holy day to us all sacred to the blessed memory of what is past for ever. Ten years ago ! and yet at any time I can open the full tide of tears over the precious record of those last Days. [FN: Her mother died August 17, 1857.]
24Aug1873, Remembering Mamma – Bolton – The usual dear Bolton Sunday, with an additional sacredness. It is the 1st S. Bartholomew’s Day since that Funeral Day in ’57 that I have been able to receive the Holy Communion

 

Lyttelton, Mary Catherine (her sister, May)
04Jul1863, May Has Scarlet Fever – Her throat is bad, but the telegraph this afternoon said it was a favourable case
09Sep1863, A Bewitching Linsey – I drove with At. E. and May to Stourbridge, and falling in love with a bewitching linsey
17Jun1869, Irish Church Bill Second Reading – Oh dear, dear ! political life has quite dropt out amid this excitement! [FN: I.e. of her sister Lavinia's engagement to Edward Talbot : and her younger sister May's very brief engagement to Edward Denison. The latter had to be broken off, as his uncle, Speaker Denison, would not consent.]
28Jun1869, The Queen’s Garden Party – The Queen held a breakfast… Papa and Sybella were there; how it is one takes that so calmly I can’t tell, but so it is. The 2 new romances swallow it up, and it is restful to see Papa so happy and peaceful.
23May1870, University Tests Bill – Dear old May dined with us, having been to the House to hear the University Tests debate.
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – (Speaker Denison) met Mrs. Talbot later in the day and asked to speak to May; to whom he just said, “I wished to shake your hand.” It deeply touched and pleased the poor child. By the strangest coincidence it is the very day year of her engagement —when she and E. Denison had that one short sight of each other as betrothed lovers ; then came the hurried meeting in the afternoon when dear Granny was with them—and then the happy sunshine was all eclipsed, and they never saw each other again.
24Mar1871, Ly. Dufferin at Ly. Cowper’s – Took my old May to Lady Cowper’s , which it was nice to do: Ly. Dufferin was there, a lovely sight, in a gown of old chocolate and gold brocade over a blue quilted petticoat.
16Jul1873, “Marie Antoinette” by Ristori – F. and I, May and Atie. P, went to see “Marie Antoinette” done by Ristori at Drury Lane. It was grand tragic acting—the only thing of the sort I have ever seen…The awful truth and recentness of the events made it almost intolerably painful and pathetic to a degree that set many off crying, me to a frightful extent!
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – …which she so loved to hear Spencer sing — Alfred was playing soft, solemn music, and the pathos of it was bringing floods of tears — when Meriel came down and gently told us the end had come. Not a sound, not a pang: the breathing died away imperceptibly as Uncle B. read the last prayer.
10Jul1875, The Last Lyttelton Half at Eton – Six brothers and 8 sisters and their husbands, Mazy, Helen, and G. G., all at Lord’s for the rest of King Alfred’s innings—his last match against Harrow, and this the last Lyttelton half at Eton. This, and the immense blank left by darling May, always such an element during these cricket times, made the day sadly unlike itself. Most of us stayed all day.
15Nov875, Everything Vanishes Away – As people arrive, and the long dinners and smart clothes begin again, my heart grows heavy with thoughts of May, who came here just this time last year, full of her last happy Keble visit; and of dear Uncle Richard, whom this place always brings back to my mind. The changes and losses seem to thicken round one, and there is something strangely sad and pathetic in the sort of diligent way one closes up the ranks and goes on and on with the old ways…
28May1877, Praise for Gladstone – At Hagley a very odd party received us, viz., Auntie P., Mr. Balfour, Albert, and Mr. Otley the young Keble man lately started as Curate at Hawarden. He was one of the happy Abendberg party, and Albert said was deeply interested in seeing Hagley because of May. Albert had taken him to see the graves and the painted window. Charles turned up after a long day’s farm inspection.

 

Lyttelton, Mary Susan Caroline (née Cavendish) (dau. 2nd Lord Chesham) (m: Charles, Lord Cobham)
29Jan1866, A Merry Servants’ Ball – A most merry, successful servants’ ball came off in the corridor downstairs…Little Mary Cavendish danced delightfully.
28Aug1878, Little Mary Cavendish – Mazy wrote me a dear letter full of little Mary Cavendish’s excellencies. [FN: Her eldest brother Lord Lyttelton, who became 8th Viscount Cobham in 1889, had just become engaged to Mary Cavendish, daughter of the 2nd Baron Chesham.]
19Oct1878, Charles Gets Married – Charles’s wedding-day a golden day within and without! …The little bride looked her very best, her face so softened with deep feeling and joy; Charles glorious!
10Mar1879, Fire at Granville’s – Lavinia busy in Committee, sending out circulars about the Ladies’ Hall, so Mary and I went off to luncheon with Willy Grenfell [FN: Now Lord Desborough.]…

 

Lyttelton, Meriel Sarah (her sister), see Talbot, Meriel Sarah

 

Lyttelton, Neville Gerald (Nevy, her brother)
15Dec1854, Carn’t – the little boys had come, so jolly for their holidays, talking of carn’t, harf, and clarss like anything.
21Apr1857, Nevy and Spencer – went back to Geddington ; niobissimus, poor, dear, old fellows.
27Dec1861, Talk With Old Nevy – who I fancy is rather softer than usual : much more civil they all are
01Apr1862, Odd party at dinner – wrote a long letter to darling Nevy for his Confirmation to-morrow
11Jul1862, Last London Day – Old Nevy has just got into the 11; he got 6 in the 1st inn. not out.
24Aug1863, Volume 8 of the Diary Begins – teaching the little brothers, Prescott with Arthur, Tasso with Nevy, “Childe Harold” with Albert, Yonge with Bob
28Oct1863, More Celebrations – I gave old Nevy a print, at sight of which he fell on my neck with a burst of affection
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – The girls, Albert, Nevy, and Spencer and I had the treat of going to Birmingham to hear the “Messiah,”
04Apr1864, Three Pummelled – Nevy and I had a splendid ride on to Kinver Edge…I put the hunter at it. He chose to take it standing
09May1864, I Like Royal Travelling Excedingly! – I was greeted by such a dear letter ; also a very charming one from old Nevy.
10May1864, Shoppums Finds Lockets for the Bridesmaids – saw my wedding presents … and a pretty inkstand (quite his own choice) from Nevy.
28Oct1864, Fred Returns Home – Dear old Nevy 19 to-day.
26Dec1864, We Kept Christmas – Next Christmas, alas ! we shall probably be without dear old Nevy, whose Rifle Brigade commission may come any day.
17Apr1865, American War to be Ended – Neville knows Lord Pembroke a little, and thinks him clever, and likely to be firm ; but he is hardly 15.
24Jun1865, Be Civil to the Constituents – M. to dinner, in the middle of which turned up old Nevy, and was most delightful all the evening. His whole tone and turn of mind does seem most sound, high-principled, manly, and modest: just what one would wish and pray for a young officer
30Jun1865, “Israel in Egypt” at the Crystal Palace – Nevy, Aunt C., and I had the great treat of hearing the “Israel in Egypt” (that is, about 3/4ths of it, being late) at the Crystal Palace.
01Jul1865, Nevy Returns to Hagley – I came back at 5½ to say good-bye to Nevy, who went to Hagley. He has been most delightful and companionable, what with his fun, his cleverness, his pleasant, good tone, and his love of music, which has resulted in the mansion echoing with all sorts, parts, and fragments of song and anthem.
28Aug1865, Cattle Epidemic, Nevy at Sea – I have a heart-pinch this evening, thinking of Nevy’s first night at sea. It will possibly be 4 years before we see him again, and what may they not bring forth !
27Jun1867, Hearing Dean Magee at the Abbey – London – Nevy and I went to an S.P.G. service at the Abbey and heard Dean Magee again…washstand for Charles whom we have actually encamped in one of the pretty bright rooms that we hoped to see gladdened with faces of our little children.
18May1868, Antidisestablishmentarianism – for the opening of the Leeds exhibition. Big dinner; then lovely little concert conducted by Hallé; then a ball in the long picture-gallery. Old Nevy turned up, on duty with part of his battn., a great break.
30Oct1871, Hunting in the Rain – Old Nevy 26 to-day. Rained steadily and nastily with little cessation. The Dauntless Duke and his faithful few went up manfully to the moors nevertheless ; but first Eddy, then Frank and Mr. Strutt, sneaked home! — Grand total, 14,273 head. We got to Chatsworth at dinner.
08May1872, Dinner, Drum and Ball – Dinner with the tall and handsome and noble-looking couple, Ld, and Ly. Brownlow. Met beautiful Ly. de Vesci, Ld. and daughter, Holfords, etc. Drum at Ly. L. Mills’ ; lovely ball with G. G. at Ly. Bristol’s—all gorgeous with flowers and plants…Old Nevy actually turned up at the ball !
15Dec1872, Nevy a Social Animal – which one hardly hoped wd ever be the case.
24Apr1876, Thoughts of Papa – F. and I stayed on at Hagley. Sybella most touching in the absolute unselfishness and patience with which she bears her great grief…Nevy once said to me, “The governor always showed us that duty must come first of all.” Letters pour in upon us, and are very helpful and soothing..
08May1877, The Wortley-Talbot Wedding – Regd. Talbot married Margaret Wortley in St. James’s Church: her 4 sisters [FN: The youngest of the four sisters, Katharine, afterwards married Lady Frederick's brother Nevill.] the only bridesmaids. Seldom were seen more tall and beautiful people assembled together..
19Oct1878, Charles Gets Married – Charles’s wedding-day a golden day within and without! Nevy, who is best man, escorted Charles down from Hagley on Thursday, and went thro’ the various duties of his office with military spirit all his own!
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Mr. Childers (War Secretary) has appointed Nevy his private 1st secretary — a really perfect thing for him, and he for it, methinks;

 

Lyttelton, Robert Henry (Bob, her brother)
07Jan1862, Little Arthur – Arthur much run after by Bobby
04Jul1858, Teaching Bobby – with some difficulty made him attentive and interested
27Nov1862, A fall from a horse – and Bobby (who is a sad coward, but doesn’t sit amiss) on Charger with leading rein
24Aug1863, Volume 8 of the Diary Begins – teaching the little brothers, Prescott with Arthur, Tasso with Nevy, “Childe Harold” with Albert, Yonge with Bob
13Jul1872, Eton Beating Harrow at Cricket – All 8 Lyttelton brothers were on the ground
19Dec1865, The Little Boys Arrive – Later arrived the 3 little boys, escorted by Newmany, looking famously well ; Bob with a good conduct prize, Edward with one for classics : jolly little Alfred with nothing but his own charms.
14Jul1871, Brothers at Cricket – Went to Lord’s for the Eton and Harrow, and had the delightful excitement of seeing Bob get 29 in a very masterly manner, he having only just scratched into the 11. It is only lately that he has begun to do at all well at cricket, but his batting is now very good…
28Jun1875, King Alfred Got 102 – On Friday G. G., Mazy, and I went to Eton with Papa, Spencer, Charles, Bob, and Arthur for the Winchester match. Darling King Alfred got 102, but it was not very exciting owing to poor bowling; he made one fine straight drive for 5.
02Oct1876, Gladstone and the Eastern Matter – we became gradually aware of cheers, and at last took it into our heads to guess what was up; rushed to the N. front, and sure enough, there was the omnibus containing the W.E.G.s being dragged up to the door by a multitude of men; with Aunt Lizzy and dear old Bob (kindly asked over from Escrick) sharing the honours, and no doubt sadly conscious of their extra weight.
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – Dined with Bob at Meriel’s and went with him to a Philharmonic, where the music was soothingly easy. Overture to “Midsummer Night’s Dream” the chief delight.

 

Lyttelton, Lady Sarah (née Spencer) (Granny, Grauntcoque when w/ dau. Caroline (Aunt Coque), Grauntcoquitty when also w/ Aunt Kitty, Catharine Pole-Carew)
Grandmamma – memories of both of her grandmothers
27Dec1857, Granny Summoned to Althorp – A telegraph with most alarming accounts from Althorp summoning poor Granny.
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – Granny’s brother, 4th Earl Spencer
10May1858, Princess Royal – dear Princess Royal begged Lady Raglan to tell Granny how happy she was
28Jan1859, Princess Royal Has a Son – Princess Alice wrote the news to Granny : “My dear dear Laddle”
29Apr1859, Adam Bede Bowdlered – Granny reads “Adam Bede”, to be duly bowdlered for our young minds
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – M. dined with Granny
18Dec1861, Prince Albert Has Diedsomeone mentioned Granny to the Queen, she said, “Ah, she knew our happy, happy life.”
19Dec1861, The Queen weeps for Albert – Granny heard from Atie. P. ; she quoted from the Dean of Windsor (who was present) the most interesting and pathetic account there has yet been
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – Granny showed me the most piteous heart-broken letter, which she has received from the Queen, who has sent her a miniature photograph of the Prince in a brooch
11Jan1863, A copy of the Prince’s speeches – Granny has received from the Queen a copy, in white morocco, of the Prince’s speeches
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – Granny had the honour of being with the Queen
19Jun1863, A Maid-of-Honour!!!!!!! – Ly. Augusta Bruce has written to Granny to ask whether, on a vacancy occurring, and the Queen being graciously pleased to offer it, there wd be any objection to my accepting the post of Maid-of-Honour!!!!!!!
22Jun1863, So Know All Men – After which came Granny and At. K., bringing with them the Queen’s official offer of the post to me
02Nov1863, A Dinnery Given by the Gentry – Alas, alas, exeunt Granny, At. Coque, and Ly. Estcourt. Granny has been here 4 months
13Jan1864, Queen Causes General Acceleration – the Queen returned from Windsor, and what Granny says Miss Skerritt used to call a “general acceleration” seemed to me at once to be observable
10May1864, Shoppums Finds Lockets for the Bridesmaids – I paid Granny a little visit ; then to M. (he also coming there), and came back here for dinner.
11Jun1864, Smashing the Ice – then to St. St., where we saw Grauntcoque , Atie. P., Papa and Meriel, and I found the seeing them rather strange and upsetting : feeling that it wasn’t me.
04Aug1864, Fred Doing the Agreeable – Dinner party … : too mad Papa hooking me in to dinner, Granny making the “moving bow” to me
23Jun1865, Granny Reads a Picture Book – To St. St., where Great-Granny was entertaining with a picture-book little George and Mary. Dined there, and chaperoned Aunt C. afterwards to Ly. Windsor’s.
19Jul1865, On Terms of Great Intimacy – I wrote to Granny fishing for an invitation to Hagley for him (Capt. Egerton) next week !
27Jun1866, Uncle W. and Auntie P. are Cheered – where Granny was entertaining her great-grandchildren, helped very pleasantly by Harry Lyttelton, who seems to have much that is nice about him : is more like his mother, to look at and to listen to, than ever.
02Mar1867, John Parry and German Reed – I went with Grauntcoquitty, Meriel, and Mrs. Robartes (very childish of such old matrons and maids!) to see John Parry and German Reed. Laughed till I was exhausted !
06Mar1867, Sermon by Dr. Pusey – We had luncheon at Devonshire House where was Netty. I went to see Kate Amberley, and Granny who got down her Bible and entered the lists with Dr. Pusey so well!
04Jun1867, Reynolds and Gainsboroughs – M., Granny, and I went in M.’s open carriage to the Exhibition ; we did little but the Sir Joshua Reynolds and Gainsboroughs, but spent a good while there, Granny as fresh and pleased over it as possible, and recognising many rolling-collared, swathed-necked, tight-coated, knee-breeched people from her own recollection of them.
08Oct1868, Reading Mansfield Park – Afterwards to the Rectory to hear Granny spout “Mansfield Park”. Her dear voice is as musical as ever ; if there is any change it gets lower, instead of quavery as most old people.
22Mar1870, The Queen Asks After Granny – I went to the Drawing-room, and the Queen asked anxiously after Granny.
18Apr1870, Granny’s Funeral – It was a glorious sunny weather, such a help and blessing. Dear Granny was laid near her husband in the vault which was opened under the S. wall of the chancel. A long train of children, grandchildren, and others and nearly all the servants followed…I felt heavy-hearted, as I thought of that last “going to church” and called up the sight of her familiar, steady, dignified walk down the old path.
18Jul1873, Scott-Siddons and Mrs. Siddons – Had a delightful Scott-Siddons reading for a charity at Grosvenor H.; made her acquaintance aftds at tea with Constance : we reminded her of Granny’s interview with her after a reading abt the year ’67, when Granny told her of her likeness to her great-grandmother Mrs. Siddons…We made her pose under the famous Sir Joshua of the Tragic Muse, and the likeness was most striking
24Sep1873, Letters of Sarah, Lady Lyttelton – The Dean has now pounced upon the book, and is in raptures over it; goes off about it to me on every opportunity. Wants us to present it to the Queen, who, he is sure, will greatly like it, in spite of one or two little things which may take her aback.
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage…It was a most stately and beautiful sight: a day of floods of sunshine, old Windsor looking as Granny used to delight to describe it.

 

Lyttelton, Sarah (her sister, Sal), see Bailey, Sarah

 

Lyttelton, Spencer (Uncle Spencer)
19Jun1859, It Felt Wicked – a family gathering, view U. Spencer’s birthday
28Jun1865, Althorp Pays Uncle Spencer’s Debts – Uncle Spencer has had one of his turf smashes, and though kind, good Althorp has paid, he is to go abroad for an indefinite time, partly to be out of the way of (English) betting, partly with a chance of finding something to do.
29May1868, Charles Reelected – Willy and Mr. Heathcote came at 5, with cheery accounts, and Uncle Spencer came at 8, announcing VICTORY. Charles and F. followed shortly in a waggonette, pursued by 2 costermongers’ carts at full speed, and a rout of dirty little boys, ooray, singing, tin kettles

 

Lyttelton, Sybil (her sister), (m: Lionel Henry Cust)

 

Lyttelton, Sybella Harriet (née Clive)
27Apr1869, Papa is Engaged – It was a day of a great event; Papa’s engagement to Mrs. Mildmay, née Clive, was settled. She seems to be the very person one could have wished for ; we do not know her, but there is only one voice as to her goodness and gentleness and sense ; she is also very clever and accomplished.
28Apr1869, Meeting Mrs. Mildmay – Meriel, the girls, and I and Charles, all saw Mrs. Mildmay for the 1st time at George St., Papa bringing her. It must have been even more awful for her than for us ! We all liked her much ; she is not in the least pretty, and looks some years older than she is (33), but she has a dear good face, and nice, steadfast-looking, kind eyes ; a very sweet voice, and a manner at once dignified and gentle.
10Jun1869, Papa and Sybella are Married – Papa and Sybella were married at her parents’ place, Perrystone in Herefordshire.
28Jun1869, The Queen’s Garden Party – The Queen held a breakfast… Papa and Sybella were there; how it is one takes that so calmly I can’t tell, but so it is…it is restful to see Papa so happy and peaceful. She was presented to the Queen, who kissed her.
12May1870, Another Baby for Papa – A little half-sister was born to the poor old dozen at Cavendish Sq. this morning — 30 years after May (sic, Meriel was 30). Sybella was frightfully ill, and the poor little thing suffered much in the birth, but all went well, and she is comfortable. It is rather a pretty little baby. [FN: Sarah Kathleen, now Mrs. John Bailey. (editor of the diary)]
24Apr1876, Thoughts of Papa – F. and I stayed on at Hagley. Sybella most touching in the absolute unselfishness and patience with which she bears her great grief: she has constant tears to relieve her, and clings to his children, and turns to the religious thoughts and words which were the “strength of his life,” to comfort her in his death…
04Jun1877, Uncle W. in Famous Force – Pleasant dinner in Harley Street, meeting Sybella, Stephy, Dr. Clark, Sir James Lacaita. Uncle W. in famous force; held forth like a brilliant book upon a notion he laid down that persecution was never taken up by the Church as such until the Papal pretensions arose. Sir J. and Dr. Clark demurred a little, but we badly wanted some one to stand up to him, and so make a good argument of it.
24Dec1877, Visiting in Italy, Jane Morris – Paid a visit in the morning to one of Sybella’s innumerable “old friends,” Edward Lear the artist. He remembers giving lessons to Freddy’s mother in Rome in ’39 when F. was 3 years old. Showed us many beautiful sketches.
19Oct1878, Charles Gets Married – Charles’s wedding-day a golden day within and without! …Dear Sybella most brave and unselfish; only broke down a little after the service.

 

Lyttelton, William Henry (Uncle Billy)
15Aug1854,Uncle Billy Engaged – Uncle Billy of all people in the known world !
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – came on purpose to do it ; the first of the whole twelve that he ever has
07Jun1864, Our Wedding Day – Our wedding day. I cannot write about it. We were married in Westminster Abbey, by Uncle Billy, and came here [Chiswick] about 4 o’clock, into peaceful summer loveliness and the singing of birds.
10Jun1871, Church Matters – Uncles twain [FN: I.e. Mr. Gladstone and the Rev. the Hon. William Lyttelton.] had an interesting argument upon whether the admission into English Orders ought not to be allowed under less stringent terms of subscription. Uncle W., true to his old Church colours, strong against further relaxation…
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – other hymns which I thought I might repeat to our darling, and I had chosen “There is a green hill far away,” which she so loved to hear Spencer sing — Alfred was playing soft, solemn music, and the pathos of it was bringing floods of tears — when Meriel came down and gently told us the end had come. Not a sound, not a pang: the breathing died away imperceptibly as Uncle B. read the last prayer.
31Jul1876, Improvements to Althorp Estate – A capital piece of matrimonial news after all the twopenny ones: B. and the Bishop of Exeter!! ..I have always thought highly of him, knowing Papa and Uncle B.’s high opinion of him.
28May1877, Praise for Gladstone – Crowds of artisans, etc., from the Black Country to see Uncle W.; church quite crammed and behaviour very good. Uncle B. walked with one of the working men who said, “Ah, Sir, you must have composed that sermon for Mr. Gladstone—faith, hope, and charity, that’s what he’s got!”
25May1878, A Death at Home – (Uncle B. invited to dinner with the Argylls) I could see the Duke hoped dinner would do her good, but she tried vainly to eat or drink; and we then saw too plainly that another stroke was upon her. He went to her and with Auntie P.’s and F.’s help supported her back to the study; we got a mattress laid on the floor…
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – where were a whole bevy of Princesses, the number being swelled by 3 Hesse girls [FN: One of these girls became the unfortunate Empress of Russia, murdered by the Bolshevists.], who are pretty, slim, and distinguished-looking. Should have liked to have talked to them of their mother (Princess Alice) and Uncle Billy, who have made tremendous friends at Darmstadt: she is in England now.

 

Lytton, barony of, see Bulwer-Lytton

 

M [TOP]

Macaulay, Thomas Babington
26Feb1856, Macaulay’s Essay – -At 6 Johnnie read to Mamma, Mrs. Talbot, M. and I some of Macaulay’s Essay on Hallam, very interesting and well written, and fearfully enraging from its horrid roundhead views.

 

Macclesfield, Lady Mary Francis (née Grosvenor)
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

MacLeod, Norman
16Feb1867, Macleod and Canterbury – We went to Lady Augusta Stanley’s, and were introduced to Dr. Macleod, the editor of Good Words, whose Liberalism and penchant for painted windows has affronted certain stiff kirk-people

 

Mac-Mahon, Marie Edme Patrice Maurice de Mac-Mahon, 1st Duke of Magenta
03Sep1870, The Last of Napoleonism Forever – A telegram was sent to Cavendish, which was taken up to Thorpe Fell, with the astounding news that the Emperor has capitulated with all that is left of MacMahon’s army, viz. 80,000 men ; giving himself up to the King of Prussia. So falls the Empire, and surely with it the last of Napoleonism for ever. The skirmish at Saarbrück which began the war was on August 3rd

 

Magee, William Connor (Bishop of Peterborough)
24Mar1867, Sermon by Magee – Went off in a hansom to St. Paul’s Cathedral. Magee , Dean of Cork, preached a glorious, eloquent sermon, outpoured with great fire and earnestness without a single note. His voice and action perfectly beautiful—unaffected and persuasive and powerful
27Jun1867, Hearing Dean Magee at the Abbey – It was a grand torrent of eloquence ; he stumbled over his words from the very overflow of them, and yet his burning thoughts seemed to outrun them. His gesticulation is so admirable that it makes his little ugly figure impressive ; he pushed the cassock-sleeves as far back as they would go as if to give himself freedom.
17Jun1869, Irish Church Bill Second Reading – They are debating upon the second reading of the Irish Church Bill, and we heard the Bp. of Peterborough (Magee) speak splendidly : wonderfully eloquent, brilliant and witty, and almost persuasive in spite of the badness of his case, for he is dead against the 2nd reading,

 

Majendie, Mr.
08Mar1857, Christ Church, Oxford – also Mr. Villars, Mr. Henniker, Mr. Palmer, all being Johnny’s friends
18Jun1877, “The Priest in Absolution” Scandal – Had a talk with Mr. Majendie about an unspeakably shocking book called “The Priest in Absolution,” which has somehow got out, tho’ it must be said it was only intended for the use of certain clergy…I shot Dizzy in a brougham, looking more horribly like a fiend than ever; poor old wretch—green, with a glare in his eye.

 

Manchester, duchy of, see Montagu

 

Manners, Charles, 6th Duke of Rutland
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – he has never got over not being allowed to marry his first cousin (Selina Forester), now Lady Newport (Countess of Bradford in 1865)
10Feb1863, Pottering about Althorp – The D. of Rutland has had another tremendous fall out hunting
19Dec1872, Another Mighty Dinner – Chatsworth – .. Supper at various little tables in the big drawing-room, capitally managed. Ly. Macclesfield, Mr. Cockerell, and I made fun at our table, all the more comical from the dignified condescension of my neighbour, Ld. Cowper, Ly. George’s silent laughter, and the poor dear Duke of Rutland’s puzzled Manner-ish high-shouldered aspect thro’ it all.
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

Manners, Lord Henry, 8th Duke of Rutland
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – a fine, spirited fellow, exceedingly tall, and in a violent state of excitement

 

Manners, Lord John, 7th Duke of Rutland
18Dec1857, Lord John – Lord John gave Charles (his godson) a perfect little leather case
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – We went to a little breakfast at Ld. J. Manners’, with children. This may be briefly described as Dull

 

Manning, Henry Edward, Roman Catholic Cardinal
12Oct1865, Palgrave and Pusey – I am reading with immense interest a book by Dr. Pusey, just out, written to Keble in answer to an attack of Manning’s
16Jul1866, A Regular At Home Going On – Manning was there, and I am rather proud of having “had speech” of him ; though it was strictly confined to the weather. He has a fine, intellectual, bald head, and a handsome, ascetic, mournful countenance.
09May1873, Huges and Manning – Meeting of the “Provident Knowledge Society,” …Mr. Th. Hughes, [FN: The author of "Tom Brown."] Manning, etc., spoke. The contrast between the ascetic, skeleton, spiritual face of Manning and the florid, well-fed, pink face of Mr. Hughes, as they sat side by side, was very funny.
13Nov1874, Manning Answers the Pamphlet – Manning has answered the pamphlet in the out-and-out Ultra-montane style, arguing as if submission to Papal Infallibility was identical with obedience to God and conscience, and stoutly maintaining his own loyalty.
22Nov1874, Letters From R.C.s Keep Appearing – Various other remarkable letters from R.C.s keep appearing in the papers; Mr. Shee, Mr. Petre, Lord Camoys, and others, disavowing the Decree in very plain language; Sir Geo. Bowyer, etc., taking Manning’s view.
01Dec1874, Pope Calls Uncle W. a Viper – Manning has thundered out a circular letter, informing the world that whoever does not accept and believe Immaculate Conception and Papal Infallibility is no Catholic. The Pope has made a funny metaphor in an angry speech calling Uncle W.. a viper attacking the bark of S. Peter!!

 

Manzoni, poet
23Jul1865, Sir Lacaita Reads “Cinque Maggio” – I made Sir James [FN: Sir James Lacaita who was Librarian at Chatsworth. The "Cinque Maggio" is, of course, the famous poem of Manzoni on the death of Napoleon.] read us the “Cinque Maggio,”

 

Mario, tenor
02Jul1863, A Northern Yankee – Beautiful select concert at the Aumales’… tho’ Grisi’s voice is much gone, and Mario’s high notes a little strained sometimes, it was glorious.

 

Mason, George Heming, painter
21Jul1870, The Story of Painter George Mason – I saw Mr. Mason the landscape painter at Mr. Richmond’s ; poor man, he looks dying of consumption. Mr. R. told me his terrible strange story. He was brought up as heir to a good fortune, liberally educated, and sent on the “grand tour.” At Rome he heard of his father’s death, and that he was left penniless…

 

Masterson, Margaret Masterson Braithwaite (dau: Lucy Blanche Lyttelton and grdau. of Lucy’s brother Neville) cofounder of Lucy Cavendish College

 

Maurice, Frederick Denison
19Feb1865, Hearing Mr. F.D. Maurice Preach – We went to hear the famous Mr. Maurice, If one had not known of his startling, peculiar opinions, I think one would have seen nothing in his sermon but what any Christian might agree with.
05Apr1872, The Famous Mr. Maurice has Died – Holker – The famous Mr. Maurice is just dead ; the papers for the most part speak of him with great respect, and indeed I believe he was a true Saint, though perhaps with the misfortune, which seems to belong to some schools of thought, of inspiring his disciples with his errors rather than his truths.

 

Mayo, Lord and Lady
15Jun1872, Meeting Poor Lady Mayo  – “This is the widow of a murdered man”

 

Princess Mary, see Teck, Duke and Duchess

 

McNeill, Duncan, 1st Baron Colonsay
23Mar1867, Dined at the Argylls’ – Dined at the Argylls’, meeting a rugged, clever old Scotch Lord Colonsay… I made acquaintance with (several names)

 

Meriel, her sister, see Talbot, Hon. Meriel Sarah (M.)

 

Miall, Edward
13May1873, Delightful and Intensely English – Uncle W. made such a brilliant overthrow of Miall and his Disestablishment as the cause ought to take long in recovering from. No one so much as answered him and the whole thing was over before dinner.
27Aug1877, Ld. Granville Speaks at Bradford – Ld. G. and came home. The big meeting came off late, and he returned at midnight, struck with the intelligence of the great crowded audience, but a little disgusted at their caring for neither Eastern Q. nor anything else compared with disestablishment, and cheering Miall louder than anybody.

 

Milbank, Mrs.
03May1865, An Old Prosaic Couple – called on Mrs. Milbank, who is to be my Prime Minister in the getting up of the horrid Yorkshire quadrille.
20May1865, Dined at Lord Wharncliffe’s – Afterwards I drove to Mrs. Milbank’s and some card deeds: tried to go to All Saints’, but was too late ;

 

Milbank, Lady Augusta
19Oct1874, Deep But Cheerful Mourning – We 3 went on to Raby, where we found the Duchess of Cleveland, in deep but cheerful mourning for her sister-in-law Ly. Augusta Milbanke who died last month.

 

Mildmay, Mrs.
20Jun1862, Lord Lansdowne – At Mrs. Mildmay’s, a bent and withered old man a bent and withered old man sat near me
08Dec1863, A Visit from Ld. Frederic – Drove in the rain for an hour with Mrs. and Emily Mildmay and Agnes. Ld. Frederic came. Pleasant evening of whist.

 

Mill, John Stuart
12Jul1865, Mill and Hughes Return – F. is over the moon at divers Liberals having been returned in London ; especially Mill the philosopher and Hughes the author of “Tom Brown.” Mill’s return notable from his having refused either to solicit votes or to spend a farthing himself. .
13Apr1866, J.S. Mill and the Claims of the People – This is my never-to-be-forgotten day… the immense luck of hearing the famous Mr. J. S. Mill make a most perfect speech…The Opposition held their tongues as if bewitched ! He followed Sir Bulwer Lytton, who made a slashing, clever speech.
17Jul1866, The Annual Bore – To the House, where the annual bore about Ballot was up, followed by Mill standing up for women-suffrage.

 

Milman, Henry Hart, historian and ecclesiastic.
16May1866, Milman, Fawcett, Ecce Homo – We dined at Ld. Taunton’s, meeting Dean Milman and Mr. Fawcett.

 

Milnes, Richard Monckton, 1st Baron Houghton
15Sep1856, Mr. Milnes – Mr. Milnes read aloud some beautiful poetry of his own. He is such an odd, nice, rough, ugly, good (apparently) man.
29Jun1865, Electionums – sitting between old Panizzi and Lord Houghton whose ungainly manners and voracious appetite contrast curiously with the quick, deep, poetical feeling which comes up in him now and then.
23Oct1865, A Visit to Lord Houghton’s – We left beautiful Castle Howard, and came here, to Lord Houghton’s, in time for luncheon. Drove with Ly. H. afterwards… I made great friends of the 3 children, Anicia, Florence, and Robin
24Oct1865, Old Accounts of Wellington’s Death – I looked through the newspaper accounts of the Duke of Wellington’s funeral, which Lord Houghton has kept.
25Nov1865, My Wisest Advice – Evening whist, with the Houghtons and Mr. Howard, while the rest of the world, except the Duke, Ly. Newburgh, Aunt Fanny, and old slowcoach Fred, played billiard-battle: even Lord Stanley.
27Nov1865, Lord Houghton Spouts His Poetry – Lord Houghton spouted 2 of his bits of poetry, but ill. “Long ago” is lovely.
16Jul1866, A Regular At Home Going On – I went to luncheon at the Houghtons, and to my horror found a regular At Home going on, and had to plunge into French to make myself agreeable to a Portuguese Comte and Comtesse and Prince Borghese.
30Sep1870, The First Post-cards – Lord Houghton spoke and sat by me at luncheon : he showed off one of the new “halfpenny cards” [FN: The first post-cards.] (which are to come into use to-morrow) on which he had written a note in Italian to his sister. They are neat little articles, with the stamp printed on the back : you send them open through the post.

 

Minto, earldom of, see Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound

 

Moliere, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, playwright
12Oct1866, Moliere – I am enjoying some Moliere.

 

Molyneux, Cecil Emily (née Jolliffe) (m: 4th Earl of Sefton)
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – Queen’s Ball, where we were rather bored ; Ld. Sefton was there with his bride-elect, and Ld. Brecknock with his ; neither very pretty

 

Molyneux, William, 4th Earl of Sefton
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – Queen’s Ball, where we were rather bored ; Ld. Sefton was there with his bride-elect, and Ld. Brecknock with his ; neither very pretty

 

Montagu of Beaulieu, barony of, see Douglas-Scott-Montagu

 

Montagu, George Victor Drogo, 8th Duke of Manchester (Lord Mandeville from 1855 to 1890)
23Jul1874, Fancy Dress Ball at Marlborough House – We dined with the Granvilles, meeting Cowpers, Cavendish, Ld. Mandeville [FN: Afterwards 8th Duke of Manchester.] (an ugly youth, but rather taking), De Vescis and daughter, Bertie, Duke of Sutherland, and certain Americans, etc., one of whom got drunk. Conversation turned much on the fancy ball at Marlboro’ House, which came off t’other night, and for which I saw Cavendish arrayed in Tudor costume. He looked famously well and handsome.

 

Montagu-Douglas-Scott, Louisa Jane, (née Hamilton) Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry (Lady Dalkeith in 1865)
04Jul1865, Duke of Newcastle and His Miserable Daughter – Lovely little Lady Dalkeith and certain pretty unmarried sisters of hers — etc., etc., were there.
07Dec1865, A Meeting at Idle – I am in love with Ly. Dalkeith, and bewitched with Ly. Dufferin. We came here (the Fairbairns) for a Mechanics’ Institute meeting at Idle

 

Morley, John, 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – Dined with the G. O. Trevelyans, meeting the Secularist Education firebrand Mr. Morley [FN: John Morley, afterwards Viscount Morley of Blackburn], who, however, was as gentle as a sucking dove to talk to.

 

Morris, Jane, artist’s model
24Dec1877, Visiting in Italy, Jane Morris – George took us in the afternoon by the sea to see a pretty villa where Morris the decorator-poet’s wife and daughters are. Mrs. Morris might have stept out of any of Burne-Jones’ pictures, and is in fact the original of the favourite P.B. [FN: I.e. Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.] lady (having sat to Rossetti)—haggard and wistful-eyed, with a heavy bush of black hair penthouse-style over the forehead; certainly handsome.

 

Morris, Lewis, poet
12Jul1880, An Ugly Waggish Mug – Ly. Stanhope entertaining. Introduced to Mr. Lewis Morris, author of “The Epic of Hades”; not like a poet to look at or talk to.

 

Morris, Tommy
02Mar1861, Russian Serfs to be Free Men – sang to us, that we might decide if his voice is good enough to compete for a choir place at Windsor!

 

Morris, William, decorator and poet
24Dec1877, Visiting in Italy, Jane Morris – George took us in the afternoon by the sea to see a pretty villa where Morris the decorator-poet’s wife and daughters are.

 

Morton, Mrs.
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – Papa to play chess with Mrs. Morton

 

Morton, earldom of, see Douglas

 

Mt. Beaumont, Lady
11Mar1873, Gladstone’s Finest Speech – To the House again, but not till after dinner (at Ly. Mt. Beaumont’s), as a pack of wild Irish were to begin the debate [FN: On the Irish University Bill].

 

Müller, Friedrich Max
19Feb1870, Meeting Max Müller – .. in a hired tub to dine at the Palgraves’. Met Professor Max Müller ; a very quiet, unaffected, pleasant man, with a decided German accent ; he thinks himself quite English. We talked arts and sciences..
12Dec1870, A Very Pleasant Party – The party here is very pleasant. Mr. M. Muller brilliant, but 0 such a bloodthirsty German ! going in for “rectified frontiers” and endless wars with that view : sickening and disgraceful ! I have not heard him declaim, however, and on other points he is charming.

 

Munro, the great
15Jan1857, Longfellow’s New Poem – In the evening the great Monro (staying at the Rectory) lectured in the school on Longfellow, chiefly his new poem “Hiawatha.”

 

Murray, Adelaide
22Jun1865, Alice Arbuthnot Killed by Lightening – The Howards, and Kitty Feilding with her sister Lady Adelaide Murray came to luncheon with us.Lady Ade. was engaged to be married the same day as the Arbuthnots.

 

Murray, Mary Henrietta (née Howard)
17Oct1865, She Dresses Madly, Unbecrinolined – I was introduced to Rosalind’s baby, a nice, fat, thriving thing, with a promise of pretty eyes, but otherwise not lovely ; very forward and lively, and delighted with her tub.

 

N [TOP]

Napier, Francis, 10th Lord Napier
29Apr1873, A New Carriage – then went to S. James Hall and heard an interesting S.P.G. speechification. Ld. Napier dry and John Bull but telling, in his stout defence of missionary work in India.

 

Napier, Robert Cornelis, 1st Baron Napier of Magdala
05Oct1868, A Good-natured Lion – Lord Napier of Magdala [FN: Lately home from the Abyssinian Expedition and the storming of Magdala.] came, and was received with volunteers, band, and cheers, and the village-people and school-children turned out in the park. He is very quiet and simple in manner, and is rather like a good-natured lion with its claws in.

 

Napoléon Eugène Louis Jean Joseph, Spanish Prince Imperial
30Jul1881, The Spanish Prince Imperial – Spanish Ambassador talked interestingly of the poor Prince Imperial: I felt more sympathetic over his longing to fight under the English flag than I ever did before: the Ambassador said he was a very high-minded and noble fellow, terribly hampered by his foolish mother’s attempts to keep him a baby, and wishing for something more manly than being petted thro’ a London season.

 

Nasmyth, James Hall, engineer and inventor
25Jul1863, Willow Leaves on the Sun – he the gt sledge-hammer man, showed a model of the face of the sun, which he has just discovered to be covered promiscuously by willow-leafshaped things

 

Nelson, Horatio, 1st Viscount Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronté
12May1866, Lou Lives on the Victory – H.M.S. Victory – We had the fun of coming with the D. to see Lou and Frank on board their harbour ship—the old original Victory, with the brass plate marking where Nelson fell; but not much of the actual old ship left. She has never made a voyage since Trafalgar.

 

Nesselrode, Karl Robert (Charles de Nesselrode)
04Nov1878, Sunday Out to Longleat – Saturday we had the break of going to Longleat for a “Sunday out.”…Count Nesselrode a very agreeable old gig, with a great round stomach; slips about from English to French in the oddest style, but talks alike political scandal and gossip in both.

 

Neville, Lady Dorothy Fanny (née Walpole) (m: Reginald Henry Nevill)
13Dec1866, Lady Dorothy Nevill – Ossington – Mr. and Ly. Dorothy Nevill came : she is a quaint, piquant, clever little woman, like a funny old picture.

 

Neville, Edward
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – was agreeably surprised, being between E. Neville and extremely agreeable Ld. Overstone
09Jul1859, Dancing with the Comte de Paris – Ed. Neville turned up, and carried me off for a quadrille, a capital one, of 50 people
26Dec1861, There Will Be War – Troops have embarked for Canada, amongst others, Edwd. Neville. There is scarcely a doubt that there will be war

 

Neville, Latimer, 6th Lord Braybrooke, Baron of Braybrooke (Master of Magdalene, Cambridge)
10Jun1862, Three Days Rolled Into One – and, for Sir Roger (the dance), the Master of Magdalene himself!

 

Neville, Ralph
10Jun1862, Three Days Rolled Into One – Ralph Neville making a facetious speech in giving “the Ladies,” the Master proposing healths well and shortly
14Jun1862, The Queen’s Duty to Her Subjects – Ralph and Seymour Neville turned up soon after bkfast, and we had gt fun, talking over delightful Cambridge

 

Neville, Reginald Henry (m: Lady Dorothy Neville)
13Dec1866, Lady Dorothy Nevill – Mr. and Ly. Dorothy Nevill came : she is a quaint, piquant, clever little woman, like a funny old picture.

 

Neville, Seymour
25Mar1857, Eton – We found Charles in the heat of a game of fives, which he lost by one I believe in our very eye. However it was an excellent game. All were flourishing. We dined at Seymour Neville’s rooms, which he is making elegant to suit his Minor Canonship. It was great fun.

 

New Zealand
25Jul1856, George Becomes Spencer – Uncle Fritz (4th Earl Spencer) gives an estate in New Zealand
30Jul1858, First Omnibus in New Zealand – Heard of the first omnibus appearing with honours in New Zealand
11Jan1859, Papa Lectures on New Zealand – with proud thrills over its English-born goodness and prosperity

 

Newcastle, duchy of, see Pelham-Clinton

 

Newman, John Henry, Roman Catholic priest, cardinal and poet
28Aug1864, A Book by Newman – “Apologia pro vita suâ” – It is written very fairly and modestly ; and in his beautiful clear style.
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – The most notable event of the week was the arrival on a morning call of no less a personage than Cardinal Newman! An historical event it was, to see him sitting in the house of the Warden of Keble College…His business was to bring Edwarden some letters of Keble, which he didn’t like to trust thro’ the post; and he had to explain certain erasures he had made in them. This he did by word of mouth, Edward being at home; but there was also a most touching and interesting mem. to the same effect in his hand-writing along with the letters. He said the erasures were only of passages expressing such vehement self-depreciation as would certainly be misunderstood, and which Newman said he “could not” leave standing. He called him his “dearly, deeply beloved friend,”…

 

Newmany, the Lyttelton family nurse
03Nov1863, The Servants’ Ball – dear old Elly, Gielen, Herbert ; Lavinia, Rowe ; May, Robson ; Edward, Shirtliffe ; Alfred, Jane Brown ; Johnny Mooreman ; Miss Merlet, Stephens ! Newmany
07Nov1863, Sounds Distsurb Unprotected Females – I called up Newmany, and she called up Shirtliffe, and both called up Jane Brown, who was attired in the most astonishing huge frilled mob-cap
19Dec1865, The Little Boys Arrive – Later arrived the 3 little boys, escorted by Newmany, looking famously well ; Bob with a good conduct prize, Edward with one for classics : jolly little Alfred with nothing but his own charms.
27Jan1865, Skating with Great Enjoyment – The dear little boys [FN: Her brothers Edward and Alfred.] came about 5, had tea with Newmany in our room, appeared at dinner, and behaved with great aplomb.
22Dec1855, An Enchanting House – On the third floor are Baby’s and Newmany’s slip of a bedroom, next to that a small apartment containing Amelia’s bed, and answering the purpose of sitting, washing, and day’s noise nursery.
14May1864, Back Home at Hagley – Elly, Newmany, and Shirtliffe greeted us ; and I have been to see my little boys in bed.
08Aug1864, Home to Fred’s Home – some heart-pinch in leaving old Hagley thus, and driving away, all the dear faces watching us off from the perron, and Newmany from the nursery window
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – Edward Talbot (who with Lavinia was at the Rectory) came down at 8, and came to our room. The night had been profoundly quiet: nothing swallowed; no pain. Except Newmany’s name, which has all along been oftenest on her lips,

 

Newport, Viscountess Lady Selina (née Forester) Countess of Bradford in 1865
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – he has never got over not being allowed to marry his first cousin (Selina Forester), now Lady Newport (in 1859)

 

Nicholas, Romanova family of Russia

 

Nillson, Christina
27Jul1872, We Cleverly Missed the Train – Christina Nillson was married in W. Abbey to a man said to be a bankrupt Parisian stockbroker

 

Nolan, an officer
Nov.1854, The Charge of the Light Brigade – through some mistake of orders, partly from Lord Lucan’s, more from an officer of the name of Nolan’s, fault, a light cavalry brigade was soon charging the Russian army

 

Northcote,Stafford Henry , 1st Earl of Iddesleigh
22Mar1873, The Duke of Cambridge – London – Dined at the Staffd. Northcotes’ to meet the D. of Cambridge whom I have never talked to before : I liked his simple, jolly, straightforward way and famous laugh. He broke the ice and our courtly silence on arriving, by shouting out to someone at the top of his voice, “COLD to-day.”
21Feb1882, Bradlaugh’s Oath Sprung – The upshot was that Sir Stafford, after 1st making a mild motion of keeping the man “outside the precincts,” was sat upon by [FN: Lord Randolph Churchill] and, seizing the opportunity of Bradlaugh’s stalking in and taking his seat, moved his expulsion, which was forthwith carried out, without his even being allowed to speak in his defence

 

Northumberland, duchy of, see Percy

 

O [TOP]

Oates, Titus
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – introducing into his denial, however, the words “the Cabinet came to a resolution,” which Ld. D. had never said. Of course he modified this giving of the lie into Parliamentary language; but he was immeasurably bitter, comparing Ld. Derby to Titus Oates for revealing secrets.

 

Odger, George
01Jan1872, News of the Prince of Wales – On Board the ‘Arno’ – England has just passed (as we trust) safely through a great and touching crisis. The English packet, the Nile, brought us letters and papers up to the 16th ; all are full of the P. of Wales ; the feeling most deep and universal. Republican addresses have been summarily extinguished by the roughest means ; Odger has been pelted and bonneted, and disloyal speeches drowned by the National Anthem.

 

Ogilvy, Henrietta Blanche (née Stanley of Alderley) (m: David Graham Drummond Ogilvy, 5th Earl of Airlie)
08May1873, A Gamboge-ey Green Gown – London – Why did I go to this May Drawing-room? Endless dismal business, too late to see the Queen, squeeze, and dead tire…Baroness Burdett…thought fit to wear a befurbelowed gamboge-ey green gown… Ly. Airlie’s fine big girls looked well in a sort of new-ink colour, with white, and Ly. Brownlow was a radiant sight.

 

Ormonde, marquessate of, see Butler

 

Orton, Arthur
02Mar1874, The Tichborne Verdict – The magnificent summing-up of Lord Chief Justice Cockburn ended on Saturday, and the jury in half an hour’s time brought in a verdict of Guilty on both counts ; and miserable Arthur Orton stands at last stripped of all his shams and masks, in native baseness….
17Apr1877, The Unfortunate Nobleman at Dartmoor – The idiotic lovers of the “Unfortunate Nobleman at Dartmoor” (i.e., Orton the swindler) tried to get up a “Demonstration” to besiege the H. of Commons with some crazy petition. It ended, in true British style, by policemen preventing more than the orthodox ten men marching into the lobby, Mr. Cross receiving a deputation and snubbing them all round with perfect civility…

 

Osborne, George Godolphin, 9th Duke of Leeds (m: Hon. Frances Georgiana Pitt-Rivers)
14Jun1865, Busy Day in London – Met the Carmarthens [FN: Afterwards 9th Duke and Duchess of Leeds. The Duchess was a daughter of 4th Lord Rivers: the Pitt ladies were, no doubt, her sisters.] and rather fell in love with her: two very pretty unmarried Pitts

 

Osborne, George Godolphin, 10th Duke of Leeds
01Apr1882, Helped Towards Prettiness – Fanny Leeds and her pleasing eldest son [FN: The present Duke of Leeds.] of 19: too like a very lanky pair of scissors, but nice-looking.

 

Overstone, barony of, see Loyd

 

Owen, Richard, palaeontologist
28Apr1879, The Monster Wingless Bird – We visited old Pro. Owen and his pretty, older sister: he delighted me with an account of the monster N.Z. wingless antediluvian bird, whose leg-bone made Owen’s fame. Heard a fine speech of Uncle W.’s on the Budget, making mince-meat of it.

 

Oxford, Bishop of, see Wilberforce, Samuel

 

P [TOP]

Paget, Lord Clarence
28Dec1860, Capital Sliding and Skating – when everyone tumbled over except Ld. Jermyn, Willy, Mr. Ryan and me; Ld. Clarence fell on his head

 

Paget, James, 1st Baronet
24Feb1881, Gladstone Hits His Head – (Gladstone fell) and cut the back of his head open on the edge of the doorstep. It sounded too horrid, but on arriving there we found the state of things wonderfully comfortable: he was not stunned even for a moment, and Sir James Paget and Clark were quite easy about him.

 

Palgrave, William Gifford
26Jun1862, A Full Day – Mr. Palgrave has just brought out a beautiful collection of English lyrics, called “The Golden Treasury”
15Aug1865, Reading ‘Policial Economy’ and ‘Arabia’ – I have begun Fawcett a 2nd time, meaning really to give my mind to as much as it is up to of Political Economy. Also we read together Palgrave’s “Arabia.”
19Feb1870, Meeting Max Müller – .. in a hired tub to dine at the Palgraves’. Met Professor Max Müller…We talked arts and sciences and Mr. Palgrave lent me Ruskin’s book on Landscape Painters, on my saying I had been unlucky enough never to have read him.

 

Palmerston, viscounty of, see Temple

 

Panizzi, Antonio Genesio Maria, (Sir Anthony Panizzi)
29Jun1865, Electionums – I at D. House, where I had an agreeable dinner, sitting between old Panizzi and Lord Houghton
07Jun1874, Old Sir Anthony Panizzi – We dined with Uncle W. at old Sir Anthony Panizzi’s: he is chair-ridden and very helpless, but amazing good company…The old fellow kept breaking out with his objurgations against “priests” at odd moments all the evening through.

 

Paris Commune
02May1871, Miserable Parisians – The miserable Parisians seem to carry on their rebellion, tho’ they arrest one after another of their own leaders ; as worms wriggle when they have lost their heads. Cluseret and Dombrowski (neither of them French) have been at the top of the tree lately ; but they have just tumbled Cluseret down !
16May1871, The Place Vendome Column Pulled Down – The last exploit of the “Commune” has been to condemn the poor beautiful Place Vendome column as an insult to international feeling ! and one of these days it was pulled down with a crash.
17May1871, Versailles Troops in Paris – The Versailles troops have at last entered Paris, and met with but little organized resistance.
25May1871, La Semaine Sanglante – It is too true that Paris is being destroyed by the miserable insurgents, who have deliberately fired the glorious public buildings with petroleum. The Tuileries is burnt to ashes ; also the Hotel de Ville and a large part of the Louvre ; other buildings, including S. Eustache, are more or less injured, and the mad people are constantly being caught flinging petroleum into houses—a body of firemen were found pumping it upon the flames instead of water.
27May1871, Hideous Murderous Fighting in Paris – The most hideous murderous fighting is going on inside burning Paris : the regulars dragging out and shooting everyone found with arms in their hands, and putting to death women and children who fling petroleum into houses. Many women fight, and the insurgents make considerable resistance behind barricades. But they are nearly stamped out now.

 

Parker, Cecil
28May1867, Very Mad Did I Feel – Emma and I went together alone to Lady Vane’s ball ; and very mad did I feel when I found myself dancing, vis-à-vis to Emma, with young Mr. Cecil Parker.

 

Parkington, Sir John
23May1859, Party at the Admiralty – where little Sir John Pakington looked Hagley-ey, and where we saw Sir John Lawrence, Capn, Mrs. and Miss Gladstone, Lady Raglan, so thin and changed, Ld. Carnarvon, Lord John Manners, Dean Trench, Miss Leigh, Mr. and Mrs. Adderley, Drummonds, etc.

 

Parkinson-Fortescue, Chichester Samuel, 2nd Baron Clermont and 1st Baron Carlingford
08Dec1874, The Chatsworth Magic Lantern – We are come to the last slide of the Chatsworth magic lantern: the Duke of Cambridge and his equerry, a funny little man called Tyrwhitt, of no particular age, in a grey wig; Lord Carlingford and Ly. Waldegrave, the Spencers, Mr. Leveson, Cavendish.

 

Parkinson-Fortescue, Frances Elizabeth Anne (née Braham), Lady Waldegrave (m: 1st Baron Carlingford, previously married to 7th Earl of Waldegrave)
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – I dined as a face with A. P. and Wortleys at Ly. Waldegrave’s
17May1865, Maid Troubles – We went to Lady Waldegrave’s and Lady de Grey’s ; where we were well squashed, but somewhat amused.
08Dec1874, The Chatsworth Magic Lantern – We are come to the last slide of the Chatsworth magic lantern: the Duke of Cambridge and his equerry, a funny little man called Tyrwhitt, of no particular age, in a grey wig; Lord Carlingford and Ly. Waldegrave, the Spencers, Mr. Leveson, Cavendish.

 

Parnell, Charles Stewart, political leader
28Oct1880, Suspension of Habeas Corpus – Hawarden -He says the panic is very great, and all the people he spoke to unanimous as to the suspension of the Habeas Corpus, on the ground that it has never been known to fail in putting down sedition. Certain landlords are said to be in danger because they are good ones; Parnell and Co. considering they stand in the way of their revolutionary schemes.
31Jan1881, Parliament and the Irish – This performance had to be repeated 4 times, Paddy after Paddy interrupting Uncle W. When Parnell (their leader) was thus marched off, all the Home Rulers rose en masse and shouted “Privilege! Privilege!” waving arms and hats. As unhappy Uncle W. had each time to begin his speech, each time to be interrupted, the Speaker then to do the “naming,” Uncle W. then to move the member’s expulsion…
08Oct1881, Leeds: They Roared Like Many Waters – for what he had to do was to warn Parnell and Co., that the “long patience” of the Government had all but reached its term. He had to say that now the Land Act was law it was to have fair play. Parnell has been inciting the people to take no advantage of it until he is pleased to give them leave. He is now explicitly warned that if he persists in this line, he will be stopped.

 

Parry, Hubert
22Feb1872, Handsome and Love-lorn Hubert Parry – Dined at Portl. Pl. [FN: Her father's house.], meeting Ly. A. Compton, Helen Gladstone, Mr. Strutt, the handsome and love-lorn Hubert Parry, who may not marry his Maude Herbert for a long while, viewing money ; darling King Alfred, etc. Nice music and singing.
25Jun1872, Maude Herbert Marries Hubert Parry – Maude Herbert was married to Hubert Parry at S. Paul’s, Knightsbridge. There was something very beautiful in the sight from the W. door : the light concentrating in the fine open lofty choir, with its flower-decked altar ; the cloudy white of the bride and bridesmaids’ garments

 

Parry, John
02Mar1867, John Parry and German Reed – I went with Grauntcoquitty, Meriel, and Mrs. Robartes (very childish of such old matrons and maids!) to see John Parry and German Reed. Laughed till I was exhausted !

 

Parry, Maude, (née Herbert)
25Jun1872, Maude Herbert Marries Hubert Parry – Maude Herbert was married to Hubert Parry at S. Paul’s, Knightsbridge. There was something very beautiful in the sight from the W. door : the light concentrating in the fine open lofty choir, with its flower-decked altar ; the cloudy white of the bride and bridesmaids’ garments

 

Pasha, Isma’i, Khedive or Viceroy of Egypt
15Jul1867, The Sultan and Viceroy of Egypt – Big swell drum at Stafford House in honour of the Viceroy of Egypt ; for, by the bye, all London is turned out of window to welcome him and the Sultan.
16Jul1867, Last Visit to the Victory – We came for a last visit to the Victory, for the naval review in honour of the Sultan to-morrow.

 

Pattison, Dorothy Wyndlow (“Sister Dora”)
23Feb1880, Transvaal and Sister Dora – Uncle W. had hardly breath to bestow on politics, being clean possessed by a wonderful “Life” just published, “Sister Dora.” [FN: "Sister Dora" was a sister of Mark Pattison, the famous Rector of Lincoln, who was not much pleased at the fuss made about her.] He sent a copy to the D. of Argyll, and they both talked of it 19 to the dozen. When Southwark was lost, he wrote to somebody, “I should be very unhappy about Southwark, if it wasn’t for Sister Dora!”

 

Paxton, Joseph (Architect of the Crystal Palace; originally superintendent of the gardens at Chatsworth.)
31May1865, A Visit to Sir J. Paxton – His little house under the shadow of his great Palace was lovely with verandah and garden : and married daughters with him.
04May1867, Paxton’s Chatsworth – Emma came in the morning, with lovely Chatsworth flowers, and went to the workhouse with me. She saw an old man who had been a smart gardener, and knew all the flowers’ Latin names, and said “Oh, Paxton’s place!” when she mentioned Chatsworth.
21Nov1869, A Visit to Lady Paxton – Chatsworth – I went with Madge to see Ly. Paxton, who is very shaky ; makes her curtsey and calls one Your Ladyship and is as simple as if she were still the housekeeper’s niece courted by the gardener’s boy as of old.

 

Peel, Robert, 3rd Baronet
11Jan1866, Goschen and Peel Promoted – There is good deal of talk about Mr. Goschen being made something (FN: Chancellor) of the Duchy of Lancaster, unbeknown to Lord Russell’s colleagues, and not having had time to do much to deserve it. Sir R. Peel over the moon at having been made K.C.B.
30Mar1881, Another Adventure With Horses – It is my 4th adventure with horses in London: my come-down in Rotten Row, my knock-over ditto, and the kicking of Meriel’s horses on the famous occasion when Sir Robt. Peel and Lord Huntly flew to the rescue.
04Nov1881, Gladstone’s Thoughts on Resignation – Never liked the tone even of Sir Robert Peel, when he used to complain of the severity of public service; which, in his (Uncle W.’s) opinion, was fairly requited and not heavier than duty called for.

 

Pelham-Clinton, Henry, 5th Duke of Newcastle
30May1862, House of Lords – dull reply, poor man. I saw him shade his eyes from the light even of the stained windows. I believe he is going blind
08Oct1864, A Long Tour – rode through Welbeck, Clumber (where the poor Duke of Newcastle is lingering, though no one thought he could live from week to week in the spring)
04Jul1865, Duke of Newcastle and His Miserable Daughter – Also saw dear Miss Dennett, now a little old lady, with traces in her worn face of the wretched life she must have had, striving to make peace between the poor Duke of Newcastle in his fatal anger and mismanagement, and his miserable daughter, when her whole self-will was set upon that tragical marriage.

 

Pennant, see Douglas-Pennant

 

Penrhyn, barony of, see Douglas-Pennant

 

Pepys, Herbert
04Mar1859, Drive to Obelisk Hill – by an awful absent thoughtlessness, what should I do but call Mr. Pepys Herbert!
28Jan1861, Messrs. Claughton and Pepys – reading extracts from Crabbe and Spenser quite beautifully

 

Percy, Edith (née Campbell) (m: 7th Duke of Northumberland)
23Mar1867, Dined at the Argylls’ – Edith Campbell, who is just out, and would be lovely but for her tiny shrunk figure ; beautiful Evy ; Elizabeth, who is less pretty, but has a better figure and very delicate features
21Oct1868, Marriage of Whig and Tory – Edith Campbell [FN: Daughter of the Duke of Argyll.] is to marry Ld. Percy! [FN: Afterwards 7th Duke of Northumberland.] a nice, good, pleasant youth, just grown up ; Presbyterian and Irvingite, Whig and Tory, I wonder how it will do.
21Sep1874, Driving With the Duchess and Edith Percy – I drove with the Duchess and Edith, and darling Lord Warkworth who loves my catspaw seal being stamped on his little white arm. He is Percy-ish and not pretty, but has a dear smile: Josceline, a fat two-year-old, is the only beauty, being like his mother

 

Percy, Eleanor, Duchess of Northumberland, (née Grosvenor)
14May1862, One Was Amused – Party at the Dss. of Northumberland ; the Japanese ambassadors, dreadful monsters, came.

 

Percy, Henry Algernon George Percy, Earl Percy (Lord Warkworth)
21Sep1874, Driving With the Duchess and Edith Percy – I drove with the Duchess and Edith, and darling Lord Warkworth who loves my catspaw seal being stamped on his little white arm. He is Percy-ish and not pretty, but has a dear smile

 

Percy, Henry George, 7th Duke of Northumberland
21Oct1868, Marriage of Whig and Tory – Edith Campbell [FN: Daughter of the Duke of Argyll.] is to marry Ld. Percy! a nice, good, pleasant youth, just grown up ; Presbyterian and Irvingite, Whig and Tory, I wonder how it will do.
20May1873, Doomed Northumberland House – Drum at poor doomed Northumberland House at which we all took a sad farewell.
21Sep1874, Driving With the Duchess and Edith Percy – We drove in the woods amid magnificent trees, and ended along the loch to see the yacht appear, which brought home the Lornes and Ld. Percy. Princess Louise very pleasant and easy; seems comfortable with them all.

 

Percy, Josceline
21Sep1874, Driving With the Duchess and Edith Percy – I drove with the Duchess and Edith, and darling Lord Warkworth…Josceline, a fat two-year-old, is the only beauty, being like his mother; the twin girls are like demure damsels in stiff long frocks out of a Vandyck picture, and there is a baby called Margaret with the D. of Argyll’s red-gold hair.

 

de Persigny, Madame
20Jun1859, Pretty Enough – 8 mortal hours and a half have we been at Mme de Persigny’s ball, and sorrow a bit have I danced

 

Persigny, Count
20Jun1859, Pretty Enough – asked Uncle William if we were pretty enough before inviting us to the ball

 

Philippe, Prince, Comte de Paris, the “King of France”
28Jun1859, The King of France – We went to the most beautiful ball conceivable at Ly. Egerton of Tatton’s, a horrid woman ; but such a room, such lighting, and such delightful space…I saw and was delighted with the Comte de Paris : ” King of France.” Such courtesy and nobleness : tall and handsome.
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – where I saw and was introduced to the “King of France” God bless him !
07Jul1859, The King’s Bottle-Holder – A breakfast, to which came the Comte of Paris! I thrilled at him as long as he was there
08Jul1859, Have Enjoyed This Ball More Than Any Other – a wonderful story of almost dancing with the Comte de Paris
09Jul1859, Dancing with the Comte de Paris – said the Lancers were beginning in another room, hooked me, and off we went! —oh, bliss!
11Apr1861, A Dance With the King of France – Comte de Paris asked particularly after me and danced with me : stomach-ache of thrill!
09Jul1863, Charles Fechter – To breakfast came the Comte de Paris and no less a man than Fechter, who was very agreeable
11Jul1870, Breakfast wtih Princess Louise – Princess Louise and Comte de Paris came to breakfast with the Gladstones ; also the famous M. de Lesseps. I went and heard Mrs. Weldon sing beautifully. Sat by Princess Louise who looked very pretty and was charming and well-mannered as usual.

 

Philips, Sir Thomas
26Sep1863, Mobs and Riots – To dinner came Sir Th. Philips : disturbances, mobs, and riots were talked of

 

Phillimore, Catherine
19Mar1864, Sibyl Grant’s Wedding – Catherine Phillimore, whom her mother presented, looked better than any other young lady ; and went through the ordeal gracefully and with no apparent self-consciousness or affectation

 

Phillimore, Robert
21Jul1866, Reading “Sir Charles Gradison” – The Coppice – Sir R. [FN: Sir Robert Phillimore, whose house The Coppice was.], to please me, spouted after dinner the beginning of “Sir Charles Gradison” ; I was amused with it beyond measure. Unless the book is the grossest exaggeration, what a state of society it was 100 years ago !

 

Phillimore, Walter George Frank, 1st Baron Phillimore
29Jun1861, Visiting Mr. Phillimore – I came to the Coppice with Mr. Phillimore…Walter [FN: Now Lord Phillimore] a nice fellow and quite awfully clever

 

Philpott, Henry, Bishop of Worcester
03Apr1872, Alfred is Confirmed – My darling Alfred was Confirmed at 3 o’clock by the Bp. of Worcester

 

Pitt-Rivers, Susan Georgiana (née Leveson-Gower) (Lady Rivers)
14Jun1865, Busy Day in London – I picked my Fred up about ½ past 4 ; but had to dine without him at Lady Rivers’, as he had a clashing engagement.
22Jun1865, Alice Arbuthnot Killed by Lightening – It is overwhelming to think of poor Lord and Lady Rivers, who have already had such sorrow in the death of their 3 sons.

 

Playfair, Dr. Lyon, 1st Baron Playfair
11Mar1873, Gladstone’s Finest Speech – a pack of wild Irish were to begin the debate [FN: On the Irish University Bill]. up sprung Uncle W. and made “the finest speech” of his life..He ran splendid tilts against Ld. Edmund Fitzmaurice for reversing the ancient custom of elders castigating the young, against Dr. Playfair for being misled by his professorial position into thinking nothing cd be done without lectures,
31Jan1881, Parliament and the Irish – A very notable week of Parliamentary events. The “debate” on leave to bring in the Coercion Bill began afresh on Monday, and the House sat for 41 1/2 hours. The Speaker and Dep. Speaker (Dr. Playfair) relieved each other, and the House divided itself as before into relays…Tories made a dead set at Dr. Playfair, who had taken the Chair, to “name” one of the lot. He wouldn’t do what the Speaker had declined to do, and a bear-garden ensued.

 

Pole-Carew, Caroline Anne (née Lyttelton) (m: Reginald Pole-Carew) (dau. of 1st Baron Lyttelton)
01Nov1863, Mad Hypotheses – the following singular remark: “If my mother had been a boy, and if I had been a boy, I shd have been Lord Lyttelton!”
19Mar1868, A Wonderful Set of Frumps – We dined with the Carews, meeting a wonderful set of frumps, but it wasn’t very bad.

 

Pole-Carew, Frances Anne (née Buller)
13Mar1865, North and South Against Us – entertaining at 5 o’clock tea the odd combination of Fanny Carew and her boy Reggie, and Althorp!

 

Pole-Carew, Lt.-Gen. Sir Reginald
13Mar1865, North and South Against Us – entertaining at 5 o’clock tea the odd combination of Fanny Carew and her boy Reggie, and Althorp!

 

Pollington, Lord
15Aug1872, First Ballot Election – a very doubtful candidate in the shape of Lord Pollington opposed him and was beaten by only 80 votes

 

Pope Pius IX
22Dec1867, An Audience with Pope Pius IX – The Pope gave us the honour of a private interview…. He is a nice old man, with snowy hair, ruddy face, twinkling keen dark eyes, an amiable smile and a most pleasing, kind manner, but not dignified. He is short and rather fat, speaks good French and was wonderfully lively and cheerful.
23Sep1870, The Capture of Rome – The King of Italy and his army, after some fighting, have taken possession of Rome as the capital of Italy : the Pope being of course no longer defended by French soldiers. Can this really be the Fall of the Temporal power? It seems so ; one might hope something from it, but the miserable silence and submission of the Opposition Bishops since the Infallibility decree was passed disheartens one altogether as to any Catholic reformation.
01Dec1874, Pope Calls Uncle W. a Viper – Manning has thundered out a circular letter, informing the world that whoever does not accept and believe Immaculate Conception and Papal Infallibility is no Catholic. The Pope has made a funny metaphor in an angry speech calling Uncle W.. a viper attacking the bark of S. Peter!!
09Dec1874, Prince George and the Greville Memoirs – H.R.H. is very good-natured and jovial, nudging and patting his neighbours, and putting his nose in their ears: he looks 70, which is a pity, at 55. He declaims about Bismarck and the Pope, and lets fly at the “Greville Memoirs” which are just out. No wonder!

 

Powerscourt, viscountancy of, see Wingfield

 

Powlett, Catherine Lucy Wilhelmina, (née Stanhope) (formerly Lady Dalmeny) Duchess of Cleveland
17May1867, Out Visiting and a Ball – thence, alone and forlorn without my pussy [FN: Her sister Lavinia who was ill.], to Duchess of Cleveland’s ball, where I sat with the wallflowers and felt a little dismal.
22Jun1867, Dining Without F – Wretched me had to dine alone at the D. of Cleveland’s. Lord Clanricarde took me in ! Afterwards together (not Lord C. and I !) to Ly. M. Beaumont’s.
19Oct1874, Deep But Cheerful Mourning – We 3 went on to Raby, where we found the Duchess of Cleveland, in deep but cheerful mourning for her sister-in-law Ly. Augusta Milbanke who died last month;
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – The Duchess [FN: Of Cleveland, mother of Lord Rosebery.] as unmercifully given to sports as ever; Sat. evening she descended upon F. and me in our snug partie carree with the Duke and Ld. Carnarvon, and was bearing off the hapless Freddy to a most inane round game, had I not thrown myself into the breach and so rescued him.
20Feb1881, Lord Derby Very Agreeable – Good walk; Lord Derby very agreeable and full of humour; I never took him in that light before; but 10 to 1, if one met him a week hence, he would not know one from Adam. He even joined the Dss.’s youthful sports and did Irish brogue, etc., very well. Not a word of politics did he speak. I like the dignified kind old Duke of Cleveland, with his clever, ancient reminiscences.

 

Powlett, Harry George, 4th Duke of Cleveland
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – The Duchess of Cleveland was very kind, and the old Duke I quite took to: when one has time, it is very interesting to hear him go off upon old recollections, and he seems to have boundless information upon some things. He gave a sort of sketch of the ancient history of Constantinople, Saturday, which was worthy of Uncle Wm. on Eccles. History !
20Feb1881, Lord Derby Very Agreeable – Good walk; Lord Derby very agreeable and full of humour; I never took him in that light before; but 10 to 1, if one met him a week hence, he would not know one from Adam. He even joined the Dss.’s youthful sports and did Irish brogue, etc., very well. Not a word of politics did he speak. I like the dignified kind old Duke of Cleveland, with his clever, ancient reminiscences.

 

Pratt, Lady Clementina Augusta (née Spencer-Churchill) (m: 3rd Marquess Camden, 3rd Earl of the County of Brecknock)
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – Queen’s Ball, where we were rather bored ; Ld. Sefton was there with his bride-elect, and Ld. Brecknock with his ; neither very pretty

 

Pratt, John Charles, 3rd Marquess Camden, 3rd Earl of the County of Brecknock
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – Queen’s Ball, where we were rather bored ; Ld. Sefton was there with his bride-elect, and Ld. Brecknock with his ; neither very pretty

 

Preston, Mrs. (née Campbell)
02Oct1858, Mrs. Preston – the most fascinating beauty I have ever seen, a strange impediment in her speech
07Oct1858, A Pleasant Day – to Morby, where we saw Mrs. Preston

 

Princess??
08Feb1862, Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Every one of us looked the better, the Prss. perhaps the most decidedly so
10Feb1862, Melancholy partings – the kind Prss. made me write them in her book…such wonderfully deep, true feelings for a foreigner, and a Romanist

 

Prothero, Mr.
10Jan1864, Missed Second Service – Mr. Prothero preached on the Magi.

 

Prussia, King of, see Hohenzollern, Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig

 

Puller, Mr.
21Jun1862, Fantastic Hair Dressing – bkfast at Stoke, with a very clever little Mr. Puller (who afterwards went mad [FN: Added later.])

 

Pusey, Edward Bouverie
12Oct1865, Palgrave and Pusey – I am reading with immense interest a book by Dr. Pusey, just out, written to Keble in answer to an attack of Manning’s
31Oct1865, Snap-dragon and Salt – the loving-hearted, earnest, sanguine character of Dr. Pusey shines through the whole book, the more striking combined as it is with such theological learning and research
19Dec1866, Thoughts on Confession – Dr. Pusey is waging a war in The Times upon Private Confession and Absolution, which he advocates most strongly, tho’ not condemning those who differ from him.
06Mar1867, Sermon by Dr. Pusey – It was a striking, solemn sermon, upon the saved “suffering loss” at the Last Day, from the “wood, hay, and stubble” of their works on earth being tested by fire, they being themselves saved nevertheless by Infinite Mercy. I hardly understand the text in the same way.
23Jun1870, Opening Ceremony for Keble College – After, we most of us managed to get on the platform in the quad, whence many good hearty speeches were made. Lord Salisbury excellent; Dr. Pusey, venerable and touching; Mr. Liddon, glorious! Dr. Pusey brought Lavinia gracefully and kindly into his speech, which nearly did for poor little pussy-cat.

14May1871, A Day at Keble College – At 11 to S. Mary’s, where Pusey preached the University sermon. He coughed and was rather confused at first, but warmed up, and the end of his sermon was grand and eloquent.
18Mar1873, Dined at the Deanery – Dined at the Deanery, the little Dean [FN: Stanley] in high form; maliciously made out that Pusey had adopted his clumsy way of using and italicizing the word “that” from Gibbon! I wonder which wd be most affronted!

 

Q [TOP]

Quin, Lord George
12May1864, My Last Regal Journey – Ld. Geo. Quin came his own self with a pretty little clock for me under his arm.
17Dec1880, Tenants Refuse Pay Rent – I went to see Lord George Quin (88) and Ly. Newburgh. Lord George said his Irish tenants had one and all refused to pay rent, against the grain however. He has just cut a tooth ! ! and given up spectacles.

 

R [TOP]

Raglan, Lady
10May1858, Princess Royal – dear Princess Royal begged Lady Raglan to tell Granny how happy she was
23May1859, Party at the Admiralty – It’s 1.15 on Tuesday morning, for we are just come in from our First Party a the Admiralty, where little Sir John Pakington looked Hagley-ey, and where we saw the great Sir John Lawrence, who saved the N.W. Provinces of India, Capn, Mrs. and Miss Gladstone, Lady Raglan, so thin and changed,..I believe it was a dull party, but we were much amused, and struck with the almost invariable ugliness.

 

Ralli, Mrs. Pantia
02Jun1873, Squirming Duke of Wellington – Lovely concert at Mrs. Ralli’s ; took Agnes and Helen to Apsley House ball and left them there. Never noticed the D. of Wellington before! Why does the poor little squirming man look as old as his father?

 

Rayleigh, barony of, see Strutt

 

Reed, German
02Mar1867, John Parry and German Reed – I went with Grauntcoquitty, Meriel, and Mrs. Robartes (very childish of such old matrons and maids!) to see John Parry and German Reed. Laughed till I was exhausted !

 

Reeves, Sims, singer
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – the “Messiah,” which was performed admirably, the solo singers being Sims Reeves, Winn, Mme Rudersdorf, and Julia Elton.

 

Religious issues, opinions
04Jun1857, Confirmation – the glorious rush of trembling calm that followed in indescribable feeling
24Sep1858, Orphan Home in Glostershire – If they turned out right-minded Christians but this they can hardly do, as Plymouth Brethren, poor things
27Sep1858, Quarrel About Confession – lead clergymen to force their parishioners to unwilling confession
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – surprised at the inferiority of the prayers to ours, in point of composition
17May1863, Dirty Gloves – Oh dear! there are things allowed by our Church which one wd be ashamed of a dissenter or Romanist knowing!
29Aug1863, Wordsworth’s Tour in Italy – Have finished Wordsworth’s tour in Italy, its view of the Church of Rome, the crying need of its reformation
25Jan1864, Stanley’s Farewell Sermon – I cannot help seeing that the aims and the standard he puts forward are not distinctively Christian, but more like those of some refined philosophy ; and one asks oneself, where are the old paths?
02Jan1865, The Pope’s Encyclical – The Pope has put forth an Encyclical letter denouncing and condemning all possible inquiry and thought, to a degree that it is supposed will make all intelligent Roman Catholics stand aghast.
29Mar1865, Gladstone Supports Dillwyn on Irish Church – My very faith in the Church makes me sure that its continuance is in no need of being insured by being forced down the exasperated throats of Romanists numbering 7/10ths of the population.
30Mar1865, Odiousness of the Pew System – We went and did the deed of taking seats for ourselves and servants at St. Martin’s ; and were considerably disgusted by the drive-a-good-bargain fashion in which the official did it
10Apr1865, Travelling to Lismore – The descent to Lismore seemed to me marvellously beautiful and like a fairy-tale
02Jul1865, At Church with a Roman Catholic – All Saints, where I sat by a poor woman, who said she was a Roman Catholic, and that “you Puseyites are almost the same as Catholics” ; to which I demurred.
20July1865, No-poperyums – folk have the No-poperyums to such a degree.
30Aug1865, Bleak Stories in the News – one may well hope, after the silly panic about popery, sisterhoods, and confessionals has died out.
03Sep1865, Eastern Church Communion – Some of the Eastern Church have lately admitted English Churchmen to Communion : a blessed thing. No Holy Communion here to-day, alas !
19Oct1865, Lord Palmerston Has Died – The Guardian gave an awful account of the state of religion in Italy : Mariolatry more and more absorbing all the devotion of the people.
10Feb1866, Religion-that-will-suit-all-creeds – The plain justice of giving dissenters (whose tax-paying goes to support the school) the option of withdrawing their children from the religious instruction of a Church school, while they profit by the secular, in the few cases where it is impossible for them to have a school of their own, seems undeniable.
16May1866, Milman, Fawcett, Ecce Homo – The new book which is making the most wonderful noise, and of which nobody knows the author—”Ecce Homo”—was discussed. It has been put down to all the notable writers of the day, pretty nearly. People differ widely about it; some thinking it most pernicious, aiming at undermining belief in the Divinity of our Lord; others thinking it noble, and likely to build people up in the Faith.
29Nov1866, Gov. Eyre, Ritualists, One Church – The Ritualism controversy is hot ; many of the extreme school openly professing disloyalty to our Prayer Book, and disavowing the name of Protestant altogether.
19Dec1866, Thoughts on Confession – Hickleton – Dr. Pusey is waging a war in The Times upon Private Confession and Absolution, It seems to me wrong to oppose private confession if it is quite voluntary ; but it is all but inconceivable to me. Many things it would be entirely impossible to put into spoken words, and so one would be false
17Jan1867, Discontent with Keble – A great discontent has arisen (in which I share) at an alteration having been determined on in the next edition of the “Xtian Year,” because of an expressed wish of Keble’s, which however he never lived to carry out.
22Jan1867, Lady Herbert’s Impressions of Spain – Finished a silly book upon Spain by Lady Herbert, chiefly filled with eulogies upon the state of religion there, which I suppose is about the most degraded in Christendom, Romanism having overlaid nearly all pure Catholicism.
06Mar1867, Sermon by Dr. Pusey – I hardly understand the text in the same way. I think it means that if only we have built upon the One Foundation, the imperfections of our works will be forgiven, the fire will cleanse them, and only what is good and true will remain. But I don’t know.
21Aug1867, Papa’s Episcopate Bill – The idiotic Peers have thrown out Papa’s episcopate Bill as it came up from the Commons, because they won’t have Bishops without a seat in the H. of Lords. It is a true, bitter criticism on this, that it is clear the wretched Peerage is the valuable thing about a Bishop !
09Oct1867, Female Heathens – I paid a flying visit to the workhouse, went for an hour to a Female Heathen Educational Association meeting (it looks like Mrs. Pardiggle in “Bleak House” !) … bade farewell to peggies and Head, and set off on our travels.
25Dec1867, High Mass – It is impossible too not to see that all the outward worship (except of the Host) centres in the Pope. The music was lovely, but altogether I was pained and grieved, and tired out with conflicting feelings.
27Mar1868, The Irish Establishment – Uncle W. has given notice of Resolutions, of which one distinctly condemns the Irish Establishment. That such a grand act of justice and right should be on the horizon seems too good to be true ; but there is to be a fair fight, and there is great hope.
18May1868, Antidisestablishmentarianism – Lord Dudley danced with me, and I tried to coax him round about Charles, but he is in horror about Disestablishment, and I fear can only be expected not to oppose actively. The clergy are against it as one man nearly, and will take up the perilous, suicidal ground of making the English and Irish Establishments stand or fall together.
11Jun1868, Service at St. Barnabas – leading people to believe in some sort of Sacramental good to be obtained by merely being present, it does seem to me very objectionable. We did not intend to communicate, so slipped out after the Nicene Creed, feeling very guilty. But it was interesting to see the vestments for the first time
24Jul1868, High and Broad Church – We drove up to the Pavilion, whence the view is lovely. Argued a good deal on the way about High and Broad Church, B. contriving to be both in a way that a little aggravates me.
25Feb1869, Not Baptized – I spoke to Head a day or two ago, asking him whether he had been confirmed, and to-day discovered, to my horror, that he has never been baptized ! having been bred up a Baptist, and taken to church-going as he grew up, when the Baptists generally are baptized. Must try and induce him to have it done.
21Jun1869, Generally With the Poor – I tried to talk to a miserable girl who knew absolutely nothing of religion, but it was bewilderingly difficult, having nothing in common to start from… Generally with the poor you feel an intense sympathy in common: indeed they leave one far behind in strong personal faith
20Jul1869, Speeches Against Compromise – There was an odious reckless debate in the Lords, Lord Cairns, Lord Grey, and Lord Salisbury (which was unexpected) all making violent speeches against concession or compromise, and a majority of over 70 decided on sticking to their own preamble, which cuts out the words by which the surplus is excluded from religious uses.
08Dec1869, Personal Infallibility of the Pope – At Rome the Bishops of the Roman Church are mustering for the so-called Œcumenical Council. The Ultramontane Italian party are said to be firmly resolved on decreeing the “personal infallibility of the Pope”—a monstrous new dogma..but lately Dupanloup, Bishop of Orleans, a strong Catholic, has written an earnest appeal against such a decree being passed ; and they can hardly ignore him, It seems a desperate turning to bay.
26Jun1870, The Doubtfullest Legends – At 7 we went to a most striking service at S. Mary’s, Crown Street, Soho : congregation of really poor, crowded; the rough people outside coming to the open door to listen ; and a preposterous sermon by a very young man who told the doubtfullest legends as if they were Gospel.
12Jul1870, Discussing Papal Infallibility – Lord Castlerosse, an old-fashioned, Liberal R. Catholic, talked to me about the Infallibility dogma in a most astonishing way. He, in common with most of his sort, dislikes the definition, and thinks it different to what has hitherto been held ; but he says that it will be defined, and that all the gallant minority, who have hitherto been so fearlessly opposing, will of course submit! The question whether the thing is true or not does not appear to be the point at all!
23Sep1870, The Capture of Rome – The King of Italy and his army, after some fighting, have taken possession of Rome as the capital of Italy : the Pope being of course no longer defended by French soldiers. Can this really be the Fall of the Temporal power? It seems so ; one might hope something from it, but the miserable silence and submission of the Opposition Bishops since the Infallibility decree was passed disheartens one altogether as to any Catholic reformation.
18Mar1872, Gladstone Not a Jesuit in Disguise – Talked Churchums a good deal, listened to Uncle W.’s regular old-fashioned, rather Conservative, and strongly anti-Roman High Churchism
03Jul1872, Entertaining the Hospital Nurses – in terrible danger of joining the Ch. of Rome
19Sep1872, The Athanasian Creed Controversy – large following of clergy, intend to give up their ministry in the Church if either the creed or the rubric attached to it are touched
20Apr1873, Evangelical Sermon – Dr. Morgan preached a sermon with much beauty and eloquence in it and the charm of strong feeling: but all “Evangelical” sermons leave me in the same vague state of mind as to what they mean us to do or to be.
10Oct1873, Catholics of Prussia – The old Catholics of Prussia have now a Bishop duly consecrated and a constitution; also they have just been recognised by the State—a notable event which seems to give them a position such as the English Church acquired after the Reformation, only they have cleaner hands…Papal infallibility, and new falsehoods imposed as articles of Faith.
11Jun1874, Thoughts on The Archbishop’s Bill – …These things are distinct disloyalties to the Prayer Book; and therefore I think show more than anything else that distaste for our Church as Anglican which leads people to Rome. They fix their whole affections on Catholicity, and cease to be watchful against its medieval and modern corruptions, and drop altogether all interest in the English Church.
05Sep1874, Lord Ripon Gone Over to Church of Rome – How any sensible, straightforward, middle-aged Englishman can bring himself to believe the Infallibility of the Pope and the Immaculate Conception, as he believes the Apostles’ Creed! or can in conscience accept these doctrines without believing them, beats me.
11Nov1874, Gladstone Pamphlet on Catholocism – Uncle William has sent F. a pamphlet just brought out on the Vatican decrees. It is a “Remonstrance,” elicited by an outcry which has been raised by one sentence in his article on Ritualism. This is the sentence: “Rome has substituted for the proud boast of ‘semper eadem’ a policy of violence and change in faith; she has refurbished and paraded anew every rusty tool she was fondly thought to have disused;…
18Jun1877, “The Priest in Absolution” Scandal – Had a talk with Mr. Majendie about an unspeakably shocking book called “The Priest in Absolution,” which has somehow got out, tho’ it must be said it was only intended for the use of certain clergy…I shot Dizzy in a brougham, looking more horribly like a fiend than ever; poor old wretch—green, with a glare in his eye.
05Jan1878, The State of Religion in France – Turin – The state of religion in France, as far as we have come across indications of it, seems to me terribly hopeless. There are no signs of any standing-ground for earnest people between Ultramontanism and all its superstitions and utter infidelity…apparently unmixed Mariolatry…
12Aug1878, Mixed Marriages with R.C. – He [FN: A friend who had married a Roman Catholic.] and his wife have at last come to an open row about the children’s religion. He declares that he only gave the promise before marriage that they should be brought up Roman on the strength of some words of hers implying that she wouldn’t hold him to the promise.
03Mar1879, Algernon Howard’s Secession to Rome – In the middle of dinner in marched Rosalind Howard to see me, in excellent looks and high force; she rubbed me up the wrong way by talking in a cheerful airy way about her brother Algernon’s secession to Rome, which has been a grief to me.
20Sep1880, Passion Play at Oberammergau – The play began at 8. We were very well placed, under cover, in the “Loge” with backs to our seats. I grieve to have to confess that I was disappointed; but I do believe chiefly because of the impossible ideal created by the extraordinary raptures I have heard and read from all quarters.
04Jun1881, Deliciously Together – He has brought out with him, to my delight, the new Revised Version of the N.T. It has been all but 11 years in hand, and ought to have had on the fly-leaf, “Revised 1870 to 1881,” instead of the latter date alone.
13Jun1881, Comments on the Revised Version – One of these days Uncle W. dined with us: we kept off politics and went high-gee into the Revised Version. When he was last ill from overwork and worry a little while ago, he went at it as he lay in bed. He doesn’t like it—objects to the pedantry of abjuring all synonyms and quasi-synonyms

 

Rice, Captain
21Oct1858, The Two Captains Rice – We both greatly like the two Captains Rice

 

Richmond, D.C.
12Jul1862, Deal Old Hagley – to chaperone the tutor (Mr. Richmond [FN: Mr. D. C. Richmond, afterwards Auditor-General.]) and me

 

Richmond, George
08Jun1873, How I Have Enjoyed Myself – Mr. Richmond had painted Mr. Tom Grenville, who knew Sir Joshua Reynolds well.

 

Ripon, marquessate of, see Robinson

 

Robartes, Juliana (née Pole-Carew) (dau. Papa’s aunt Caroline Anne) (m: Thomas James Agar later Agar-Robartes, in 1869 created 1st Baron Robartes of Lanhydrock and Truro)
11Jul1862, Last London Day – kind Mrs. Robartes lifted At. C. and me in her carriage to Lord’s for the Eton and Harrow match
06Mar1876, The Queen Opens a Grocers’ Wing – With Ly. Robartes and At. Coque to L. Hospital to see the Queen open the “Grocers’ Co. wing.” … The Q. very punctual : stood rather grim and glum on her platform, but at the right moments, when she did bow and smile and make those incomparable curtseys of hers, was, in spite of her little dowdy black bonnet, as Queen-like and gracious as ever.

 

Robartes, Thomas James Agar later Agar-Robartes, in 1869 created 1st Baron Robartes of Lanhydrock and Truro
24Jul1876, Painting Wellington’s Forehead – Ld. and Ly. Robartes. He and Uncle W. were good company at breakfast. He told me an anecdote of the D. of Wellington’s always insisting on having his forehead represented in painting or sculpture wider than it was, and Chantrey telling Lucas, to whom the Duke was sitting. Uncle W. (so exactly like him!) took the story desperately to heart…

 

Roberts, Frederick Sleigh, 1st Earl Roberts
24Nov1880, The Fine March from Candahar – we dined at the Admiralty, and went on to a party at the Childers’, where I had the pride of talking to Sir Frederick Roberts,[FN Afterwards Earl Roberts.] the hero of the fine march from Candahar and the victory just afterwards. He is an ugly little man, with pleasant, unaffected manner; his face burnt red and without an oz. of flesh.

 

Robinson, Frederick Oliver, 2nd Marquess of Ripon (1852 – 1923)
09Jul1863, Charles Fechter – Ld. De Grey’s little boy, who is frantic with admiration of Fechter, was sent for to see his hero
28Aug1876, A Shooting Machine – N.B. Speaker and Harry Brands and Ld. De Grey came this week. Ld. de Grey [FN: The last Marquess of Ripon, a very famous shot.] a curious mixture of both parents to look at. He can be pretty nearly summed up as a shooting machine; kills double anybody else.

 

Robinson, George Frederick Samuel, 3rd Earl de Grey of Wrest (1859), 1st Marquess of Ripon (1871) (Lord de Grey, Lord Ripon after 1871)
09Jul1863, Charles Fechter – Ld. De Grey’s little boy, who is frantic with admiration of Fechter, was sent for to see his hero
07Feb1866, Cavendish to the War Office – the Markiss was puzzled ; but lo and behold ! the cat is out and he succeeds Ld. De Grey in the War Office, to the satisfaction of all parties, which is a fine thing for a man of 32.
05Sep1874, Lord Ripon Gone Over to Church of Rome – One horrid thing signalized my birthday: the news in the paper of Ld. Ripon of all people in the world having gone over to Rome…, beats me. Even if (which God forbid) I saw no alternative between this and infidelity, I had far rather “wait in the darkness” patiently, and be as illogical as possible, than so force my conscience.
22Nov1874, Letters From R.C.s Keep Appearing – The whole thing reveals deep and wide differences among R.C.s; and, if Ld. Ripon reads the controversy, he surely must feel a little uncomfortable. Manning, by the bye, pronounces Ld. Camoys a heretic, if he sticks to what he says.

 

Robinson, Henrietta Anne Theodosia, (née Vyner) (Lady de Grey, Lady Ripon after 1871)
14Jul1863, A Good Recherché Ball – A good recherché ball (my last) at Ly. De Grey’s
17May1865, Maid Troubles – We went to Lady Waldegrave’s and Lady de Grey’s ; where we were well squashed, but somewhat amused.
21Jun1865, Encountered Great Swells – Dined at Lady de Grey’s to meet the D. of Cambridge, and encountered great swells, viz. the Duke and Duchess [FN: Afterwards Duchess of Devonshire.] of Manchester
03Mar1866, A Party During Lent – Had to go, as an inevitable civility, to a party at Lady de Grey’s as we had refused 3 other invitations of hers. I had the Lentums, and didn’t like it at all !
10Apr1869, New Fashions – I wore a square-cut blue silk trimmed with lace, with full hanging sleeves and a little lace and blue topknot ; a new fashion for London and destined, I hope, to cut out low gowns! But alas! at Lady de Grey’s afterwards I was the only person minus shoulders.
19Feb1870, Meeting Max Müller – .. in a hired tub to dine at the Palgraves’. Met Professor Max Müller…Drum at Ly. de Grey’s.
23Mar1874, As Jolly as a Sand-boy – At 5.30 tea turned up Uncle W., as jolly as a sand-boy at having shirked the House; and made himself highly agreeable to Lady Ripon who also turned up.
02Jul1877, Garden Party with Poor People – Lateish we went off to Brocket; joined at the station by Ly. Ripon and finding Mr. Leveson here. Intensely still place, looking like a clearing in an old forest; too much betreed, but with some glades stretching away, with bracken and rabbits.

 

Robinson, Mr. and Mrs.
13Jun1864, A Summer Saunter – Mr. and Mrs. Robinson called, which brought over me a fresh attack of who’s who and what’s what especially when Mrs. R. was glad “Lady Frederick” saw the place to advantage!

 

Roebuck, John Arthur
25May1878, A Death at Home – Many weighty speeches on our side. Old Roebuck made a vicious onslaught on the Opposition like the venerable and venomous mosquito that he is, and then hobbled out of the House. When he returned, Mr. Dillwyn, who hitherto has always made room for him on the front bench below the gangway, only edged away a little, and Roebuck, after trying for a minute to balance himself bodkin, was hirpling off again…
24Nov1879, Short Supply of Young Ladies – The old wasp Roebuck is dead.

 

Rogers, the Misses
23Dec1862, Papa’s lecture on poetry – Mr. Claughton, Mr. and Mrs. Turner, Mr. Stayner, and the Miss Rogerses dine, their uncle’s poetry:”Human Life”

 

Romanova family of Russia
1825-1855, Nicholas I
19May1874, The Queen and Nicholas I of Russia – Well do I remember Granny’s description of the grand parting of the Queen and the Emperor Nicholas; when, encircled by the whole Court in the great hall, the Queen bade him farewell with a magnificent curtsey, and he made a magnificent bow.
1855-1881, Alexander II
19May1874, The Queen and Nicholas I of Russia – Alexander II who has just come over to see his daughter, was entertained. He is a dignified, well-looking man, but must be immeasurably inferior in appearance to his splendid gigantic father, of whom the Queen must often have thought as she received this one with the same honours.
1881-1894, Alexander III
28Jun1873, Meeting Young Nicholas II – The Czarevitch and Cesarevna [FN: Afterwards Alexander III; the Cesarevna, afterwards Empress, was the sister of the Princess of Wales.] are here; he is an ugly, fair, big dog of a man; she dark and pretty and with our Princess’s manner; but not high-bred looking…The sister Princesses dress alike and seem immensely happy together.
1894-1918, Nicholas II
28Jun1873, Meeting Young Nicholas II – Smart garden party for the Shah at Chiswick; I had the honour of shaking hands with their two little Grand Dukes Nicholas and George; fine children, but plain.
Alexandra Feodorovna (dau: Princess Alice)
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – Edith and I in the evening to the new chapel of ease close to Compton Place, where were a whole bevy of Princesses, the number being swelled by 3 Hesse girls [FN: One of these girls became the unfortunate Empress of Russia, murdered by the Bolshevists.], who are pretty, slim, and distinguished-looking. Should have liked to have talked to them of their mother (Princess Alice) and Uncle Billy, who have made tremendous friends at Darmstadt: she is in England now.

 

Rome, Capture of
23Sep1870, The Capture of Rome – The great war so absorbs one that an event probably far more enduring in its effects hardly excites talk. The King of Italy and his army, after some fighting, have taken possession of Rome as the capital of Italy : the Pope being of course no longer defended by French soldiers. Can this really be the Fall of the Temporal power ?

 

Rubens, painter
01Jun1858, Selling the Rubens – The great Rubens out of the billiard-room came up to be valued
09Oct1858, Amazing Fun – Papa has sold the Rubens for £500

 

Rudersdorf, Mme, singer
26Dec1863, Hallelujah Chorus – the “Messiah,” which was performed admirably, the solo singers being Sims Reeves, Winn, Mme Rudersdorf, and Julia Elton.

 

Ruskin
19Feb1870, Meeting Max Müller – We talked arts and sciences and Mr. Palgrave lent me Ruskin’s book on Landscape Painters, on my saying I had been unlucky enough never to have read him.
20Feb1870, Reading Ruskin – I am much bewitched with my 1st dip into Ruskin.

 

Russell, Charles James Fox, third son of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford
11Mar1873, Gladstone’s Finest Speech – debate [FN: On the Irish University Bill]. up sprung Uncle W. and made “the finest speech” of his life..Old M. was in Sir Ch. Russell’s box [FN: "Sir" in the Diary : but she probably refers to Lord Charles Russell, then Serjeant-at-Arms.] and greatly delighted with the speech: wigged Johnny for voting against.

 

Russell, Frances Anna Maria (née Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound) (Lady Russell) (m: 1st Earl Russell)
07Mar1866, Meeting Lowe and Carlyle – Afterwards for a little while to Ly. Russell’s drum, against my grain ; but it was a necessary civility.

 

Russell, John, 1st Earl Russell (Lord Russell)
26Jan1855, Russell has resigned – Lord J. Russell has resigned, and they expect the rest of the ministry will soon be picked out
29Jan1864, Dinner at Ld. Russell’s With Dickens – We dined at Ld. Russell’s, which was very pleasant. There were there Dickens & Landseer ; neither very pleasant to look at, though one saw wit and genius in Dickens’ odd eyes. Ld. Amberley took me in
01May1865, Commons and Lords Discuss the Murder – Then to the House of Lords, where Lord Russell was inaudible and Lord Derby spoke coldly and grudgingly ; it was rather disgraceful
12Sep1865, Lord Russell’s Book a Bore – We had 2 pulls at discarded Lord Russell [FN: That is, a book of his.] who is rather a bore.
19Oct1865, Lord Palmerston Has Died – It is hoped that the Queen will send for Lord Russell ; but there is no one now to advise her, and how terribly she must want the Prince!
23Oct1865, A Visit to Lord Houghton’s – The Queen has appointed Ld. Russell to form a ministry, to the violent rage of the Times. Letters
12Jul1866, Picnicky Little Business – Russell appeared, much hidden by an enormous white beaver hat : he looked extremely placid and light-hearted, and cracked some little jokes. I believe he has got over the defeat now.
14Jun1871, Talking With Lord Russell – No less (and no bigger) a person than Lord Russell took me in to dinner, and was delightful, with his dry humourous anecdotes. Said his 1st political recollection was Pitt’s going out of office ; also said Lord Castlereagh used to be very kind to him, but, on his displeasing him once, told him he ought to be whipped! He remembers…
01Jun1878, Old Lord Russell Has Died – We walked with Hugh Smith to inquire at Pembroke Lodge, where old Lord Russell has lately died, his last illness having come on just after the 50th anniversary of the Tests Repeal Act. He was not able to receive the deputation, but Lady Russell, I believe, read the Address to him and made him understand something about it. The Amberley boy who succeeds is about 11: said to be very quick and sharp—an out-and-out Stanley.

 

Russell, John, Viscount Amberley (Lord Amberly) (father of Bertrand Russell)
02Jul1863, A Northern Yankee – Ld. Amberley took me to supper; a very small, scrubby-looking youth, but full of intelligence and with pretty manners.
29Jan1864, Dinner at Ld. Russell’s With Dickens – Ld. Amberley took me in: seems clever and acute, but like so many men nowadays takes one’s breath away by unchurchlike, not to say unbiblical, opinions,
21Sep1864, Former Beaux Engaged – Had a glowing letter of happiness from Rosalind Stanley, who is to be married on the 4th, and who announces her sister Kate’s engagement to Lord Amberley.
07Jul1865, A Good Drawing in Punch – There has been an exceedingly good drawing in Punch of “Mamma Russell and Mamma Gladstone” (the statesmen, in bonnets) teaching their respective babies to walk, alluding to Lord Amberley and Willy standing for Leeds and Chester.
13Jul1865, Up to the Ears in Electionums – and poor Lord Amberley being beaten rather hollow. Said Lord A. and his wife are staying here ; and take their defeat with admirable good temper and philosophy.
14Jun1866, That Person… Bright!! – Dined with the Amberleys, meeting only one person, and that person . . . Bright!! (Oh that one could become a Boswell now and then!)
01Jun1878, Old Lord Russell Has Died – We walked with Hugh Smith to inquire at Pembroke Lodge, where old Lord Russell has lately died, his last illness having come on just after the 50th anniversary of the Tests Repeal Act. He was not able to receive the deputation, but Lady Russell, I believe, read the Address to him and made him understand something about it. The Amberley boy who succeeds is about 11: said to be very quick and sharp—an out-and-out Stanley.

 

Russell, Katherine Louisa (née Stanley) (dau: 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley) (m: Viscount Amberly)
11Jun1866, The Bakers of Africa – I went to Ly. Amberly’s, and saw the famous Bakers who have been in the depths of Africa.
06Mar1867, Sermon by Dr. Pusey – We had luncheon at Devonshire House where was Netty. I went to see Kate Amberley, and Granny who got down her Bible and entered the lists with Dr. Pusey so well!
24Apr1868, The Quondam Slave – I went to Kate Amberley, who had a quondam slave to trot out : a poor, respectable-looking mulatto woman, with a handsome, ladylike white daughter, and a book with the heartbreaking story of her life. Such things to hear about make one go on one’s knees, and thank the Mighty Hand that has scorched up for ever, by means of that tremendous war, the iniquity of generations.

 

Rutland, duchy of, see Manners

 

S [TOP]

St. Albans, William Beauclerk, 10th Duke of St Albans
11Apr1861, A Dance With the King of France – Introduced me to the D. of St. Albans with great propriety! Declares he will learn to valse!!
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

Salisbury, Bishop of, see Hamilton, Walter Kerr

 

Salisbury, marquessate of, see Cecil

 

Salt, Titus, 1st Baronet
14Jan1871, Saltaire Settlement by Sir Titus Salt – We went to see the famous “Saltaire,” a complete settlement built by Sir Titus Salt for the work-people employed in his mighty factory (woollen and mixed fabrics). There are numbers of pretty almshouses, beautiful schools and cottages, a great self-supporting dining-hall, an infirmary, a splendid Mechanics’ Institute in course of building, and a big heathen temple in the midst, serving as Independent Chapel.
28Jan1874, The Irreconcileables and Sir Salt – F. came home late, and a good deal harassed. He has no wish to attempt to conciliate the Irreconcileables; but the best class of dissenters who are supporting him and earnest against splitting up the party, have sat upon him to make some concession, and he has written to Sir Titus Salt (a typical man of the sort)..
27Aug1877, Ld. Granville Speaks at Bradford – … the opening of the Liberal Club at Bradford… Titus Salt lionized us (viz., Egertons, Granvilles, and me) over Saltaire, which looked as flourishing as ever in spite of hard times and many idle looms out of the 1,000 in the great 2-acre room.
30Sep1878, A Visit to Saltaire – Next day, in spite of pitiless rain, Titus took us and Ld. Carnavon over the magnificent Saltaire schools. I never dreamt of anything on such a scale. He is especially proud of the Board Schools, which consist of Kindergarten and a great Mixed School…
01Dec1879, No End of Luxury – To a political do-ment at Shipley on Monday, the hospitable Titus Salts putting us up at Milner Field, amid no end of luxury. —Tuesday. To Wentworth, where we met Thompson Hankeys, agreeable old birds, Ly. Gwendolen Ramsden, a die-away dull woman, like an old Indian, and her very handsome niece Hilda Graham.

 

Sandon, Lord
30Aug1861, Brown & Tomkins vs. Marquis & Viscount – Ld. Sandon is to marry Ly. Mary Cecil, refreshing and satisfactory

 

Santley, Charles
25Mar1878, A General Mad Hatter’s Tea-party – Santley sang “Revenge! Timotheus cries” grandly, and I thought fit to say to Ly. Salisbury that the song was sadly appropriate to the state of things between Russia and England—no less a person than Schouvaloff (whom I did not know by sight) being in my pocket! His keen, handsome old face remained quite impassive, however.

 

Scarsdale, barony of, see Curzon

 

Schouvaloff (Shuvalof), Peter Andreivich, Russian diplomatist
25Mar1878, A General Mad Hatter’s Tea-party – Santley sang “Revenge! Timotheus cries” grandly, and I thought fit to say to Ly. Salisbury that the song was sadly appropriate to the state of things between Russia and England—no less a person than Schouvaloff (whom I did not know by sight) being in my pocket! His keen, handsome old face remained quite impassive, however.

 

Scott, see Montagu-Douglas-Scott

 

Scott-Siddons, Mary Frances
01Apr1867, Mrs. Scott-Siddons Reads Shakespeare – A young Mrs. Scott-Siddons, about 20 years old, recited some Shakespeare and Tennyson at the Hanover Square rooms. She is beautiful, her voice lovely ; soft, but clear and ringing. But what promises most of all by far is her acting. I feel as if the dream I have had all my life of what should be on the stage is to be realized.
18Jul1873, Scott-Siddons and Mrs. Siddons – Had a delightful Scott-Siddons reading for a charity at Grosvenor H.; made her acquaintance aftds at tea with Constance : we reminded her of Granny’s interview with her after a reading abt the year ’67, when Granny told her of her likeness to her great-grandmother Mrs. Siddons…We made her pose under the famous Sir Joshua of the Tragic Muse, and the likeness was most striking

 

Sebastopol
19Sep1855, Sebastopol Has Fallen

 

Selfe, Mr.
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – the tiny Christening cap surrounding his little placid face, which struck Uncle B. on first sight with its look of happy thoughtfulness. Mamma came to church, so nice. Mr. Selfe, Althorp, and Aunt Emmy were godparents ; Mr. Cavendish and Auntie P. representing the two latter.

 

Servants, Governesses, Schooling
1842 – 1854
Childhood Memories
Learning French
Miss Crump
Miss Pearson
At Age Thirteen
 
01May1855, The Queen’s Ball – My head was washed by Strathearne, a hairdresser, and he says it ought to be a “very good ‘ed of ‘air.” He did Agnes’(Agnes Gladstone) and my hair in the evening, at about 7.
22Oct1855, Our Lessons – the very essence of regularity, but nevertheless the squabble, the chatter, the clatter, the laughing, the scolding, the crossness…quite bewildering
22Dec1855, An Enchanting House – On the third floor are Baby’s and Newmany’s slip of a bedroom, next to that a small apartment containing Amelia’s bed, and answering the purpose of sitting, washing, and day’s noise nursery.
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – We had a hasty embrace, Win and I made a low curtsey to the admiring servants, and then rushed back into the carriage, for it was rather late.
05Jun1856, Our New Governess – On the 5th came our new governess, a nice real comfortable English one, ladylike and pleasant-looking, she has begun us so well : our week divided into Monday and Thursday for Italian, Tuesday and Friday for French, Wednesday and Saturday for English, with a half-holiday on the latter day.
20Sep1856, New Game: Croquet – we had some games of croquet, a nice Irish game introduced here by Miss Smith (the governess)
30May1857, Fishing – carp was let fall by the culpable cook and rendered unfit for presentation
05Jun1857, Mr. Hunt – letter re: her confirmation from “Dove”, her former governess, Mrs. Oxley
08Jun1857, Our Last Day – I made Witherby show me at the last minute some nests
05Nov1857, Beset With Dangers – a man keeps skulking about … Uncle Henry has his gardener under his stairs
23Jun1858, The Mayde of Alle Worke – a mare for my riding, the boys’, and his own when necessary, and also for hunting
05Aug1858, Out of the Schoolroom – Oh, the deep sadness of the flying years!
04Jun1861, Servant Problems – gave warning to me rather impertinently, I was put into a regular tremble and heart-beatings
06JUN1861, Wheeler Eats Humble Pie – at the last moment ate humble pie; and was received back into favour with dignified condescension
18Sep1861, Thieving Maid – has been thieving and is to be prosecuted, as an example to others and a warning to herself
19Sep1861, Taken Into Custody – She showed strangely little feeling ; some loud crying
20Sep1861, Hard Labour – sentenced to 14 days’ prison and hard labour
28Sep1861, Worcester Gaol – went to see wretched Henriette in Worcester gaol. Found her in strapping health and unchanged in manner
15Aug1862, A Tiff With The Grim One – I had a terrific tiff with the Grim One. [FN: Her maid.]
13May1863, Alone in a Cab – I went alone in a cab, with nothing but a footman
08Sep1863, Summoned to Windsor – The wretched Gielen must go blind and mad with work, in spite of many helpers, but ! “la Royne le veult.”
10Sep1863, First Day as Maid-of-Honour – And I confess I was also impressed by the 8 noiseless servants and indeed by all I saw
11Sep1863, Poor Peggies – Oh dear, I shall sympathize for the rest of my life with poor peggies [FN: I.e. maidservants.] launched at their first place !
12Sep1863, Beginning to Like Court Life – more like a peggy than ever! “Please’m, may I go out for an hour?”
18Sep1863, Sankoo – Busy most of the morning going over the rooms with Elly : we shall be 30 in the house, besides servants, for Charles’ 21st birthday
13Oct1863, Step-carpetums and ball-chairums – It’s pleasant to see these girls come back as cheerfully and heartily to their work after such a holyday
19Oct1863, More Preparations – The gallery floor begins to assume a lovely light toffee hue, by dint of rubbing
03Nov1863, The Servants’ Ball – A splendid servants’ ball, to which came Stourbridge tradespeople and Hagley farmers, ended our week’s doings
07Nov1863, Sounds Distsurb Unprotected Females – many interactions with servants around ‘steps on the gravel under my window’
30Nov1863, A Weary Evening – First, Gielen bothered me with a disagreeable bit of abigailums; squabbles between her and Ellen
13Jan1864, Queen Causes General Acceleration – the Lady-in-Waiting taking audible possession of the room next mine, unknown men cropping up in the corridor, and all the blazing liveries bursting out.
01Feb1864, Many Die in Chili – a tremendous scrimmage and rout among my clothes against the arrival of my new abigail ; a nice-looking, quiet-mannered body called Morgan, foreign only inasmuch as she is Welsh ; I have had enough of French, Swiss, and German experience!
02Mar1864, Miss Merlet is Dismissed – letter of dismissal to Miss Merlet whose “rapports” between us and the girls are very objectionable, and whose tone of mind and conversation is flippant and sarcastic
03Mar1864, A Relief – Miss M. got the letter, we presume ; but she gave no sign of surprise, indignation, or wounded feeling, and was particularly affable at luncheon
07Mar1864, Unutterable Things – Miss M. looks unutterable things, but says nothing.
29Apr1864, Fourth Waiting Continues – Drove with the Queen, Prss. Helena, and Pr. Leopold to Ryde: 4 horses, equerry, 2 out-riders, and all very imposing
10May1864, Shoppums Finds Lockets for the Bridesmaids – saw my wedding presents…but I will mention the prettiest, completest little writing-table in the world from my old Maid
14May1864, Back Home at Hagley – Elly, Newmany, and Shirtliffe greeted us ; and I have been to see my little boys in bed.
20May1864, I Did District for the Last Time – Elly called me to her room afterwards to give me a Bible and Prayer Book in one from all the under servants. This quite finished me.
23Jun1864, Ice in June – A Princely Idea – all new to both Fred and me. We have an affable courier called Holffman, who ordered us a sublime fly and pair at the station,
01Jul1864, Travel Plans Get Complicated – The upshot is, that we leave Morgan to get well under the auspices of Holffmann and the doctor, and come here alone with 2 bags, i.e., Engelberg
05Jul1864, No More Maidlessness – Then by fly and steamboat through Interlaken to Thun, where it was a little refreshing after 4 days’ maidlessness, makeshifts, and packing for oneself, to find Holffmann and Morgan
08Aug1864, Home to Fred’s Home – some heart-pinch in leaving old Hagley thus, and driving away, all the dear faces watching us off from the perron, and Newmany from the nursery window
04Oct1864, Ducal Circumstances – Our evening tête-à-tête was a happy revival of honeymoon! the 22 servants, horses, dogs, and carriages having vanished utterly from sight.
14Oct1864, Sniffing After Houses – We had a solemn interview with Mr. Currey, an excellent fat factotum of the Duke’s, who has been sniffing after houses
15Oct1864, Above and Below the Mark – I inspected the Curzon Street House with Mrs. Hislop, one of the 7 ducal housekeepers ; and Fred had another Currian interview.
13Dec1864, Decorating the House – Thence to our splendid mansion, No. 21 Carlton House Terrace, where we met my old Meriel and Mrs. Talbot, and Trollope, the builder-and-furnisher’s man.
26Mar1865, Selecting a Parish Church – We went to St. Martin’s in the morning … we have decided, it being our future parish church, to take sittings in it for ourselves and servants.
22Apr1865, We All Rowed, Even the Duke – Household cares are beginning with us : Ross and some of the servants are in the mansion…a bad story has come out about the young Gladstone footman we had engaged
09May1865, Family Prayers – London – Our first family prayers ; all the servants attending.
10May1865, Underservants Minus Crinoline – I am triumphant at starting the underservants minus crinoline during their work!
17May1865, Maid Troubles – The kitchen-maid turns out sick and incapable ; the upperhousemaid pert, fine, and lazy. Woe is me !
18May1865, Princess Helena Holds a Drawing-room – I awoke with a sense of household cares such as I used sometimes to have at dear old Hagley, but they melted a good deal away on my conversing with Ross and the peccant but candid Eliza.
28May1865, Servants go to Church – St. Martin’s, where I had the pleasure of seeing 4 of our servants file into their pew.
01Jun1865, Transatlantic Cable -Poor Morgan has lost an only brother.
02Jun1865, We Shut Them Up Together – I sent poor Morgan off to her sister-in-law, and got in the good old Grim One for stop-gap !
08Sep1865, Lord Granville Engaged, Rather Awful – Lou put out her wedding presents ; the upper servants have given her a pretty silver inkstand, the under ones here a charming wooden blotting-book cornered with silver.
06Oct1865, Regal Style – We came to Hardwick, in the same regal style as last year : special train, swarms of horses, dogs, carriages, and servants, and barouche and four to meet us at Chesterfield.
14Jan1866, A Tiff With Morgan – My day much overclouded by a tiff with Morgan, serious enough to entail upon her a talking-to from Fred and a threat of giving her warning
29Jan1866, A Merry Servants’ Ball – A most merry, successful servants’ ball came off in the corridor downstairs…For the 1st time in my life, indulged in polkas and other whisks, with Frank and Eddy,
03Mar1866, A Party During Lent – Had to go to a party at Lady de Grey’s…Dinners feel much less frivolous to me: connected quiet talk, saving of trouble (and expense!) at home, and early getting away, and no squash or roar, or crowd of footmen, linkmen, and unwashed, gaping and shouting outside.
Lady Day, 1866, Warmer Out Than In – To Morgan, began the dear old “Warnings of the Holy Week.”
07Nov1866, Maid Troubles – I am worried by my new maid turning out dreadfully huffy with the Duke’s household, and unmanageable when I tell her to show my gowns to other people. She is going. It perplexes me sadly how all I say and do, though it is not without prayer, seems to fail utterly with one maid after another.
04Dec1866, Duchess of Manchester, Too Beautiful – I am shivering all over with a miserable scene with my maid who squabbles with all the servants.
10Dec1866, Valsing at the Servants’ Ball – A delightful servants’ ball came off in the Banqueting-room. I valsed. [FN: As a girl she had not been allowed to valse.]
12Dec1866, A New Maid – To my inexpressible relief and comfort, my odious little maid went off, and gentle, pleasant-looking, quiet little Mrs. Parry came, who will probably turn out a Felon, but is meanwhile very soothing.
15Feb1867, Maid Parry is Expecting – To my bewilderment and dismay last night, my poor maid Parry, who is married, announced in a tremulous voice, that, when she had been with me only a few days, she suddenly and unexpectedly discovered that she was several months gone with a luckless baby! My head span, but I hope to manage a stop-gap, and take the poor thing back.
09Oct1867, Female Heathens – Our charming honeymoon courier Hoffman is with us, as convinced as ever that we are about 5 years old and not to be trusted to take our own tickets…All is fun to me ; the little wizzy mob-capped neat-as-a-pin peggy, the jabbering voices on the landing.
20Jun1868, A Warning to Parry – I went thro’ the horrors of giving warning to Parry; poor me, when shall I get a good creature who won’t be tiffy with her fellows ?
08Jul1868, To Brussels – It does seem bewildering to be on the Continent again…We feel rather unprotected with only English servants, viz., Head, the Grim one, and B.’s Wilkinson.
12Feb1869, Coursing in the Park – Coursing came off in the mosses and the park ; Ld. R., Margaret, and I drove with Aunt Coque in the sociable, and the fat cockney coachman got so excited that he drove us down impossible places over the grass, to Aunt Coque’s delight and Uncle Dick’s terror.
25Feb1869, Not Baptized – I spoke to Head a day or two ago, asking him whether he had been confirmed, and to-day discovered, to my horror, that he has never been baptized ! having been bred up a Baptist, and taken to church-going as he grew up, when the Baptists generally are baptized. Must try and induce him to have it done.
31Aug1869, To the Picture Gallery – Dresden – I had to take Shepherd [FN: Lord Frederick was ill.] with me to the picture gallery. She was delighted. The younger of the two cherubs in the San Sisto is really like little Victor, only darker.
19-22Jan1870, The Footman has Rheumatic Fever – Poor George the footman has rheumatic fever : such a sick house never was.George grew so much worse, that late in the evening (unknown to us) the doctor came and bled him—such an unheard-of thing nowadays, that we telegraphed for Dr. de Vitre, who thinks very seriously of his case, and also of poor Porter, the groom of the chambers, who has a very bad throat. The 1st thing we heard in the morning was the sad news of George’s death at 1 o’clock. . .
19Feb1870, Meeting Max Müller – Our coachman being unkind enough to have laid himself up with influenza, we had to go in a hired tub to dine at the Palgraves’.
29Nov1872, The Men-Servants Make Deadlocks – The Algy Wests, Trevelyans, Mr. Glyn, and Cavendish dined ; and the men-servants chose the occasion for making deadlocks all through dinner ; dealing out crashes with the lift, smashing a big dish, and sticking in the mud generally ; the worst of all being the omission of the oysters, which were brought up with great pomp and never handed round ! !
14Dec1872, Everything in Place Cavendish Style – Chatsworth – The house is getting into order by dint of much marching about it of heads and hands : all is being pondered and prearranged in true deliberate Cavendish style ; and I quite expect that when once the whole machine is given a shove on Tuesday off it will go, everything in its proper place, from the Duke to the scullery-maid.
25Feb1873, Shot Albert’s Quondam Tutor – to a special Committee at the House.. Shot, to my amusement, Albert’s quondam tutor Mr. Richmond, doing Secy. to the Schools Commission… We have started a Beautiful Being named Henderson as butler.
21Jul1873, Bp. of Winchester Dies From Fall – A letter from Atie P. at Holmbury came to me this morning with the appalling news of the death of the Bp. of Winchester…dislocated his neck and was killed on the spot…We came home. Went E. with poor Atie. P., who is dreadfully taken out of: they were at Holmbury to meet the Bishop, and were just expecting his arrival when the groom brought word of a “bad accident,”
10Jul1881, 50,000 Volunteers – To make it more provoking, we were in the close neighbourhood, having accepted an invitation to “Peck” Hamilton’s, close to Sunninghill. F., of course, ran the one train so fine that we missed it…Left servants and luggage to twirl their thumbs till 8 p.m. and set out walking….
03Apr1882, Preparing a Peggy for Confirmation – Nevy and I to St. Paul’s again, for Mattins at 10. Came home afterwards for a final lesson with my peggy [FN: I.e maid-servant] whom I am preparing for Confirmation. We got to Holker at 9. Found the Duke alone, but Eddy’s and boys come Thursday.

 

Seward, William H. , U.S. Secretary of State
26Apr1865, President Lincoln is Murdered – the wretched man who perforce succeeds him : Andrew Johnson, “a mean white,” who, on his election to the vice-presidency the other day, made an incoherent drunken speech
01May1865, Commons and Lords Discuss the Murder – Seward is likely to recover. Johnson has made remarkable and powerful but dangerous and vindictive speeches.

 

Sewell, Elizabeth Missing
22Nov1880, Sent Off a Letter – Went to the Mon. Pop with Spencer and Alfred; alack ! it was rather beyond me. Sent off a letter which is to appear in the M. Packet, in answer to an unprovoked attack on High Day Schools by Miss Sewell.

 

Seymour, Frances Selina Isabella (née Poyntz), Dowager Lady Clinton (first husband was 18th Lord Clinton, second was Sir Horace Seymour, Aunt Yaddy’s father)
04Jul1859, Two Balls – We shopped, and our great-uncle’s sister-in-law, the first Ly. Spencer’s sister, the second’s stepmother, and the third’s aunt, and Althorp’s stepmother’s stepmother, in virtue of her intricate relationship, gave us lovely muslin gowns
30Aug1875, The Complicated Relations of Lady Clinton – Spencers were expected Monday, but were prevented by the death of old Ly. Clinton, aged 80, who has long been very feeble and doting. Her head was always a little confused, but her involved relationships were enough to account for it. She was sister to one Lady Spencer, stepmother to another, and aunt to a third…

 

Seymour, Mr. Horace
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – was thrown early in the day, and his horse, running away and leaping a high fence, pitched on his head and broke his neck!

 

Seymour, Lord
15Jun1859, A Torrent of People – looked very dismal, Ly. Blanche Lascelles, whom his parents wouldn’t let him marry, being engaged to Ld. Boyle

 

Shaftesbury, earldom, see Ashley-Cooper

 

Shannon, earldom of, see Boyle

 

Shaw-Stewart, Octavia (née Grosvenor) (dau: 2nd Marquess of Westminster)
17Nov1869, Westminster Leaves the Oddest Will – Old Lord Westminster is dead (some time ago), leaving the oddest will : one place to the Shaw-Stewarts, another to Lord Dicky, after his mother’s death, who has besides the whole of the personalty. Lord Grosvenor is immeasurably rich, but probably short of ready money.

 

Sidgwick, Eleanor Mildred (née Balfour) (Nora)
23Jan1876, Wonders About Wine and Childbirth – Mary (Frank) Lascelles has a little girl. Nora Balfour is to marry a Cambridge Moral Philosopher, Professor Sidgwick; a dau. of Ld. Claud Hamilton, Professor Tyndall!!!
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – After this, we went straightway to Newnham Coll., where they left me and I had a delightful troll with the nice old Principal (Miss Clough)… There seems to be all proper care and chaperonage, and regular hours, but no stupid primness or unnecessary constraint. Went round by the Backs to call on Nora Sidgwick: then paid a visit to Mrs. Thompson…

 

Sidgwick, Henry
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – After this, we went straightway to Newnham Coll., where they left me and I had a delightful troll with the nice old Principal (Miss Clough)… Mazy, who was here last week (staying with the Sidgwicks), is hot upon the brilliant idea of Helen going up there for a few years.
08Dec1879, Gladstone a Little Elated – Sidgwicks (she née Balfour) came, and Ld. Wolverton, besides which Lavinia is here with her little May and Neville…the Sidgwicks and I and Edward crept in to the Temple of Peace to listen, and it was grand to hear Uncle W.’s brilliant disquisition on the whole subject..

 

Simeon, Sir John, 3rd Baronet
20July1865, No-poperyums – There is much fear that ridiculous old Locock (I only quiz him on this occasion : we owe him a great deal) will beat Sir John Simeon in the Isle of Wight ; folk have the No-poperyums to such a degree.

 

Skerritt, Miss
13Jan1864, Queen Causes General Acceleration – the Queen returned from Windsor, and what Granny says Miss Skerritt used to call a “general acceleration” seemed to me at once to be observable

 

Sleeping Arrangements, see Housing, Buildings, House Guests and Sleeping Arrangements

 

Smith, Hugh, Mr.
16Jun1865, Another Fall from a Horse – We drove together to get a wedding-present for dear Mr. Hugh Smith.
07Sep1871, Shipbuilding at Barrow – The Eddies, the Duke, and we went to pay our respects to Barrow and show it off to the Hugh Smiths, whom we pickt up at Furness Abbey. The jute mills are roofed and 60 machines are already up in the weaving shed…Mr. Smith in the wing made our blood run cold by describing the awful inflammableness of jute which generates heat in the core of each bale to a horrid extent, unbeknown, of course.

 

Smith-Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey, 14th Earl of Derby
29Mar1859, Ld. Derby Will Go Out – Every expectation that Ld. Derby will go out, and Radicals come in for good!!! Thunder!!! Uncle Billy lectured on Bodies again.
24Apr1861, The New Budget – squash at Ly. Derby’s, he in immense spirits, poking fun at Aunt Pussy about the Budget
01May1865, Commons and Lords Discuss the Murder – Then to the House of Lords, where Lord Russell was inaudible and Lord Derby spoke coldly and grudgingly ; it was rather disgraceful
25Feb1868, Dizzy: Lord High Conjuror – Great news! Lord Derby has resigned, owing to broken health; and the Lord High Conjuror has got to the top of the ladder, viz., Dizzy is Prime Minister!! His party take it with a bad grace. I wonder how the Queen likes it.
09May1873, Huges and Manning – Meeting of the “Provident Knowledge Society,” …Mr. Th. Hughes, [FN: The author of "Tom Brown."] Manning, etc., spoke. The contrast between the ascetic, skeleton, spiritual face of Manning and the florid, well-fed, pink face of Mr. Hughes, as they sat side by side, was very funny.

 

Smith-Stanley, Emma Caroline (née Bootle-Wilbraham) (Lady Derby)
30Jun1866, Never Go There Again – I took Agnes to a party at Ly. Derby’s, and fervently resolved never to go there again, such were the stick-in-the-mud arrangements of the comings and goings.

 

Princess Sophia Frederika Mathilde of Württemberg, Queen of the Netherlands
05Jul1875, Queen Sophia of the Netherlands – London – had luncheon at Devonshire House, after which came the Queen of the Netherlands to see the house, and was great audience to the pictures, giving us the pedigree of the Pr. and Prss. of Orange and the Governess of the Netherlands. Settled Medes and Persians to pay Chatsworth a visit the end of October!

 

Southey, Robert, poet, biographer
26Nov1872, The Life of Cowper by Southey – I have been reading for anything but the 1st time that pathetic thing, the Life of Cowper by Southey

 

Spencer, Adelaide Horatia Elizabeth (née Seymour) (Aunt Yaddy)
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – Poor Aunt Yaddy, only two months ago rejoicing in her little son
03Mar1858, A Visit to Althorp – a young widow with two babies beside her
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – saw At. Yaddy and the tinies, they grown but looking rather delicate
19Oct1863, More Preparations – It’s odd to see her here in autumn, and without her little couple, who are recruiting at Brighton
23Oct1863, A walk with Aunt Yaddy – I walked with At. Y. We were audience to two splendid triumphal arches in the avenue
28Oct1863, More Celebrations – At. Yaddy and I marched off to the lodge with a jug of tea, 4 pieces of cake… for Mary Page and Widow Read, who couldn’t get to the Arms
08Jan1864, Shopping for the Second Waiting – That kindest of people, At. Yaddy, took me up to London this morning (darling Va with us), and under her auspices I have bought…

 

Spencer, Charles Robert, 6th Earl Spencer
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – Poor Aunt Yaddy, only two months ago rejoicing in her little son

 

Spencer, Charlotte (née Seymour) (m: Althorp)
06May1858, Althorp is to Marry – to marry Miss Charlotte Seymour! who is good, lovely, darkish, not over tall, and everything delightful
09May1858, The Miss Fortescues – but we didn’t see her, much to my disappointment.
23Apr1861, A First Rate Ball – oh, little Charlotte, I fell over head and ears in love as usual
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – Charlotte and At. Henrietta pounced upon me, and practised many experiments on my hair
08Feb1862, Spencer’s Fairy Queen – a particularly nice walk with Charlotte, and loved her more and more, her gentle ingenuous thoughts, simplicity and truth, …looked too lovely and bewitching
26Jun1863, The Guards’ Ball – many beauties : Charlotte Spencer, Ly. Adelaide Talbot, Ly. Mary Craven, the Dss. of Manchester, Princess Mary, etc.
17Mar1865, Lady Manageress Pounces on Countess Spencer – I went to London House, with a brigade of Associated Ladies. Charlotte Spencer came for the first time and was immediately pounced upon
20Feb1869, Charlotte is called Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Tallee came; ’tis a huge treat to see her ; she is going shortly to Ireland, where Althorp is getting on famously ; Charlotte is called Spencer’s, Fairy Queen.
08Jul1871, Lord Tennyson: Rat-Taily Hair – I partook of no less than 3 teas : Sir J. Lefevre’s, Auntie P.’s at Downing Street, and Charlotte Spencer’s to Ly. Superintendents. At Downing Street I was introduced to Tennyson, a dirty man with opium-glazed eyes and rat-taily hair…At Spencer House a lovely sight was the Faerie Queen receiving the good dowdies with all her gracious bright courtesy.
02Sep1872, The Lovely Charlotte Spencer – Dismal rain again : the poor gentlemen sat sadly abt the house until after luncheon, when it cleared and they set forth merrily. I had a nice little walk with my once and for ever Queen of Hearts, Charlotte Spencer. She is still the same lovely and delightful thing that first won my heart when I was 18.
04Sep1872, Out in a Thunderstorm – Dingy weather, with a sharp thunderstorm, which caught Emma, Charlotte, and me in the Valley of Desolation just after sending the carriage away. Eddy, not shooting, was luckily with us, and we mounted the Queen of Ireland upon his pony, on which she arrived before us at the Aigill barn. No prettier picture can be imagined than the lovely creature, broom in hand, opening the little barn door to admit us ; she had been sweeping it out.
20Dec1872, High Jinks and Thoughts on the Prince – Our Queen of Hearts was a sight never to be forgotten for grace and liveliness and fun (or is this the Princess of Wales?)
20May1874, A Meeting of Supplemental Ladies – Went with Lady Granville to a little meeting of Supplemental ladies at the Oldfields’, to discuss a little “Steppingstone” Home for little would-be servant gals of low degree. Charlotte Spencer, Mrs. Loyd Lindsay, Ly. Marion Alford, Aunt Yaddy, and other great dames were there.
08Dec1874, The Chatsworth Magic Lantern – We are come to the last slide of the Chatsworth magic lantern: the Duke of Cambridge and his equerry, a funny little man called Tyrwhitt, of no particular age, in a grey wig; Lord Carlingford and Ly. Waldegrave, the Spencers, Mr. Leveson, Cavendish.
10Dec1874, The Hunting Proved Fragment – Fairly fine again. L. tennis; Charlotte very eager. It froze sharp, in spite of which Spencer, like his uncle before him (“Uncle Jack”), arose before the dawn on the chance of hunting being possible in S. Derbyshire, and departed with the hapless Mr. Coke and brothers Buller, all en route for various destinations.
22Jul1879, Comments Around Gladstone Portrait – A ball at Spencer House on the ground-floor. I wonder when I last went to a ball! Felt sadly old and wizzy. F. in speechless amazement at seeing some middle-aged society birds still at it diligently, as they were 20 years ago. Charlotte is grown fat, but is still lovely.

 

Spencer, Frederick, 4th Earl Spencer (Uncle Fritz)
25Jul1856, George Becomes Spencer – Uncle Fritz (4th Earl Spencer) gives an estate in New Zealand
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – And the short brightness of Althorp is clouded
31Jul1876, Improvements to Althorp Estate – We went to Harleston, where the Spencers are staying, while Althorp is to be turned over to builders for improvements. I have never been there since a happy visit before I married with Papa, in 1863…We all went over to Althorp, Sunday afternoon, and in spite of its being all in curl-papers I revived old old recollections, going back to New Year ’54, and Uncle Fritz calling me Topsy. They have laid out a garden on one side which is an immense improvement.

 

Spencer, Jane, Baroness Churchill (née Conyngham) (Lady Churchill, Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen)
14Jan1864, Die Or Go Out of Her Mind – who is a most winning and attractive person ; quite the most highbred-looking woman I ever saw, and with the kindest and most simple, unaffected manner : tall, dignified, and graceful, with a small noble head ; and her whole look reminding one of a gazelle
17Jan1864, Dining With the Queen – the upshot was that the Household went to church on its own account, Ly. Ch. and I being diddled out of half the service by the Queen’s keeping us to go with her for the latter half. And she did not go.
11Jul1867, Lady Churchill’s Little Boy – Lady Churchill brought her wonderful little boy to see me ; born after 12 or more childless years of married life : a strapping, sharp, ugly little fellow.
01Mar1872, The Queen is Attacked – The Queen behaved beautifully; she was horribly frightened, and just called out “Save me” to Lady Churchill

 

Spencer, John Charles, 3rd Earl Spencer (Uncle Jack)
10Dec1874, The Hunting Proved Fragment – It froze sharp, in spite of which Spencer, like his uncle before him (“Uncle Jack”), arose before the dawn on the chance of hunting being possible in S. Derbyshire, and departed with the hapless Mr. Coke and brothers Buller, all en route for various destinations.

 

Spencer, John Poyntz, 5th Earl Spencer (Althorp or Spencer)
31Mar1857, Baby Baptized – Mr. Selfe, Althorp, and Aunt Emmy were godparents
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – And the short brightness of Althorp is clouded —sorrow has come upon them at the height of their happiness. Tallee and Althorp are lonely orphans, and the two little children are fatherless.
06May1858, Althorp is to Marry – Now for a good bit of news. Althorp is to marry Miss Charlotte Seymour ! who is good, lovely, darkish, not over tall, and everything delightful.
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – Althorp mounted me on a nice, spirited, high-stepping little horse called Friar Tuck
10Feb1863, Pottering about Althorp – while Althorp and Ld. Suffield tried hunters, and had excellent luncheon at the agent’s
19Oct1863, More Preparations – the departure of the Spencers, who have set off for Egypt with Tallee, he having not recovered all his strength after inflammation of the lungs
25Jun1867, A Smart Gown of High Fashion – I with Papa to the Royal Ball, where I danced with Althorp ! Wore a smart yellow gown of high fashion ; clinging to one’s hips, perfectly flat in front and magnificently tailed behind.
20Feb1869, Charlotte is called Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Tallee came; ’tis a huge treat to see her ; she is going shortly to Ireland, where Althorp is getting on famously ; Charlotte is called Spencer’s, Fairy Queen.
08Dec1874, The Chatsworth Magic Lantern – We are come to the last slide of the Chatsworth magic lantern: the Duke of Cambridge and his equerry, a funny little man called Tyrwhitt, of no particular age, in a grey wig; Lord Carlingford and Ly. Waldegrave, the Spencers, Mr. Leveson, Cavendish.
10Dec1874, The Hunting Proved Fragment – It froze sharp, in spite of which Spencer, like his uncle before him (“Uncle Jack”), arose before the dawn on the chance of hunting being possible in S. Derbyshire, and departed with the hapless Mr. Coke and brothers Buller, all en route for various destinations.
31Jul1876, Improvements to Althorp Estate – We went to Harleston, where the Spencers are staying, while Althorp is to be turned over to builders for improvements. I have never been there since a happy visit before I married with Papa, in 1863, when he hunted with great enjoyment on a famous hunter of Spencer’s called Pale-Ale, and affronted Spencer by blaming the horse for refusing a brook.
22Jul1879, Comments Around Gladstone Portrait – Althorp so taken out of at the death of an ex-aide-de-camp of his, Capt. Wyatt-Edgell, at a great slaughter of the Zulus, that he would have put off the ball, if he had heard of it in time….
26Jul1880, Gladstone falls ill – While waiting for him near the Downing St. garden door, saw Uncle W. talking to Althorp, looking perhaps a little tired (yesterday heard he was very). He walked over to dine with us (not dressed).
23Feb1881, Courage to Tackle the Queen – Uncle W. high-gee having gone at the Queen about Ash Wednesday. H.M. had fixed a Council at Windsor for that day at a church-going hour, and neither Althorp [FN: I.e. Lord Spencer] nor Ld. Granville had the courage to tackle her! Uncle W. did, however, with perfect success; H.M. thanking him politely and fixing the hour much later.

 

Spencer, Lavinia (née Bingham) (m: George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer) (mother of Granny)
23Nov1866, Discussing Lavinia, Lady Spencer – We walked, she and I and Lou, and talked, amongst other things, of the lady who was grandmother to Tallee, great-great-aunt to Lou, and great-grandmother to me. [Her face is well known from Reynolds' portrait, so often engraved.]

 

Spencer, Sarah Isabella (Tallee)
29May1856, Her Majesty’s Birthday -at supper at Spencer House after the illuminations
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – And the short brightness of Althorp is clouded —sorrow has come upon them at the height of their happiness. Tallee and Althorp are lonely orphans, and the two little children are fatherless.
16Jun1859, Worth Coming to London – Then Mrs. Talbot took us to George St., where we dined, and came back for that momentous event, our first concert..Moreover, I was introduced to young Ly. Spencer, radiant in her winning loveliness : talked to the nice Yorkes, to Althorp, and many other folk. Tallee was there, with At. Yaddy. It would be worth coming to London if only for this sort of thing.
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – Tallee’s horse wdn’t take the mildest ditch even, so we came to a stop in the 2nd field
08Feb1862, Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Tallee and I, all in powdered hair twined back over a high “pelote,” with lace handkerchief at top
10Feb1862, Melancholy partings – cuddled much with Tallee and the Prss., read them my bit of poetry
18Sep1862, Darling Tallee Spencer – Darling Tallee makes a vacuum in my heart more than most people
20Nov1862, First Meeting With Future Husband – It is most delightful being again with my Tallee and a spell of capping verses
21Nov1862, My form of shyness – Nice bits of Tallee ; she read aloud one of Stanley’s sermons in the East
22Nov1862, Exploring Chatsworth – Tallee drove back with Ly. Louisa and we three capped verses
05Dec1863, Viewing Hardwicke – where we spent 2 hours going over the wonderful old house : I wished for Tallee with her antiquarian tastes
04Jul1865, Duke of Newcastle and His Miserable Daughter – I saw much of Tallee, and had a little bit of capping with her.
23Nov1866, Discussing Lavinia, Lady Spencer – I have delightful sits and trolls and “sweet converse” with old Tallee, whose goodness and charm to my mind give her grace and beauty that wins me more than a lovely face!
20Feb1869, Charlotte is called Spencer’s Fairy Queen – Tallee came; ’tis a huge treat to see her ; she is going shortly to Ireland, where Althorp is getting on famously ; Charlotte is called Spencer’s, Fairy Queen.
02Jul1872, A Smart Dinner at Dev. House – Smart dinner at Dev. H. in the big square room. Very splendid and stately : Lornes, Tecks, Granvilles, Brownlows, Tallee, Spencers. Tail.
19Sep1873, Sweet Converse With Tallee – I have sweet converse with Tallee. Va is a good-tempered cheery thing, with a funny little face rather like an apple that has been hung a few minutes to roast.
04Dec1876, An Odd Trio of Books – Tallee the greatest of breaks and helps to me—the more that F. was busy Mon. and Tues. We read and greatly enjoy the odd trio of books—Butler’s “Analogy,” the “Faery Queen,” and Carlyle’s “French Revolution.” Good heart for 5 days. In the evening with F. “The Abbot.”
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Thence I drove off to Brompton Consumption Hospital to see a young widow in whom Tallee is interested, quite dying, and aware of it, but very cheerful. Such are the magic-lantern slides of one’s London life.

 

Spencer, Victoria Alexandrina
29Dec1857, Uncle Fritz Dies – her father, 4th Earl Spencer
03Mar1858, A Visit to Althorp – pointing and gesticulating with a pair of fairy hands, or with little rounded wrists
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – the tinies, they grown but looking rather delicate, but Vay improved in looks
08Jan1864, Shopping for the Second Waiting – That kindest of people, At. Yaddy, took me up to London this morning (darling Va with us), and under her auspices I have bought…

 

Spencer-Churchill, Harriet (née Gough-Calthorp) (young Ly. Spencer?) (m: Lord Alfred S-C, son of 6th Duke of Marlborough)
16Jun1859, Worth Coming to London – young Ly. Spencer, radiant in her winning loveliness
20Jun1859, Pretty Enough – I answer nonsense to the questions that come from her beautiful mouth, and could beat myself

 

St. Albans, duchy of, see Beauclerk

 

St. Aldwyn, earldom of, see Hicks Beach

 

St. Aubyn, Mr.
13Feb1866, The Lower Class and the Upper Class – Got home to luncheon, where we entertained Mr. St. Aubyn who is going to be married.

 

Stanhope, Emily Harriet (née Kerrison)
12Jul1880, An Ugly Waggish Mug – Pleasant afternoon (after a tremendous thunderstorm) at Wimbledon, taking Edith; Ly. Stanhope entertaining. Introduced to Mr. Lewis Morris, author of “The Epic of Hades”

 

Stanhope, Philip Henry, 5th Earl Stanhope
17Jan1866, All Expecting, Ah Dear Me – Ld. Stanhope, who flatters me with his attentions, sent me some letters that passed between certain French big-wigs and the then Ld. Stanhope in 1792.

 

Stanley, Agusta
15Mar1866, Ly. Augusta and Dean Stanley – no couple in the world were so unlike as Dean Stanley and his wife. She, big, vigorous-looking, very dark and ugly and coarse-featured (but with a nice good face all the same) ; he, wonderfully shrunk, small and squinny, with little sharply-cut features and light complexion. They are devoted to each other.
02Jul1872, A Smart Dinner at Dev. House – her window-gardening show
07Feb1867, Tea wth the Stanleys – Entertained at 5 o’clock tea Agnes, Ly. Augusta Stanley, and her little Dean, who got through an alarming amount of bread and butter.
16Feb1867, Macleod and Canterbury – We went to Lady Augusta Stanley’s, and were introduced to Dr. Macleod, the editor of Good Words, whose Liberalism and penchant for painted windows has affronted certain stiff kirk-people

 

Stanley, Algernon Charles
03Mar1879, Algernon Howard’s Secession to Rome – In the middle of dinner in marched Rosalind Howard to see me, in excellent looks and high force; she rubbed me up the wrong way by talking in a cheerful airy way about her brother Algernon’s secession to Rome, which has been a grief to me.

 

Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn (Dean Stanley, Dean of Westminster)
15Jun1863, Meeting Howard and Jowett – These kind people have packed unheard-of numbers into their ingenious little house
18Jun1863, Shaking Hands with the Princess – to Dr. Stanley’s garden, to see the tent which the latter slept in in the East
25Jan1864, Stanley’s Farewell Sermon – I read Stanley’s farewell sermon at Oxford (Ch. Ch.). It grieved and shocked me, in spite of great eloquence, earnestness, and feeling
07Feb1867, Tea wth the Stanleys – Entertained at 5 o’clock tea Agnes, Ly. Augusta Stanley, and her little Dean, who got through an alarming amount of bread and butter.
06Apr1867, A Fine Dinner – We dined at the Cardwells’…he took me down and was delightful, and in great force. We amused him largely with what I heard the other day ; that he and Dean Stanley, who were at a private school together, were reported to their respective fathers as dolts in the matter of arithmetic!! I believe it is still true of the Dean.
06Mar1868, A Most Powerful Sermon – Service at St. James’s : the Dean of Westminster preached a most powerful sermon on “Eli, eli, lama sabachthani ?” speaking as if from his very heart of the darkness and perplexities of life
04Mar1872, The Course of Events Like a Drama – talking of the loyal outburst in the country… nothing cd. have been imagined more striking than the course of events, and indeed it has been like a drama
18Mar1873, Dined at the Deanery – Dined at the Deanery, the little Dean [FN: Stanley] in high form; maliciously made out that Pusey had adopted his clumsy way of using and italicizing the word “that” from Gibbon! I wonder which wd be most affronted!
18Jul1881, Death of Dean Stanley – On Monday, just after midnight, died Dean Stanley, after about a fortnight’s illness, ending with erysipelas in the head and lungs. I saw him last at his “Window-gardening show” in the grounds of the Abbey, when he is supposed to have caught a fatal chill…

 

Stanley, Constance (née Villiers) (m: 16th Earl of Derby) (dau: George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon)
25Apr1868, Duke Shot by Fenian – Ld. C. was also great fun over Ld. Derby’s anti-compulsory-Church-Rate-abolition speech…Says I, “What a pity you could not attack him in that fashion in the H. of Lords.” “No!” says Ld. C. ; “he’s too kind to Constance” (née Villiers, married to Ld. D.’s 2nd son) “for me to abuse him.”

 

Stanley, Edward Henry, 15th Earl of Derby (Lord Stanley until 1869, then Lord Derby)
25Nov1865, My Wisest Advice – Evening whist… played billiard-battle: even Lord Stanley [FN: not a person much given to the lighter side of life.].
12Apr1866, Speeches at the House – Lord Grosvenor moved his amendment, and was seconded by Lord Stanley. I could hear little of either as Ld. G.’s voice is weak and low, and Lord S. tumbles over his tongue in an odd way ; but I believe Lord S.’s speech was very effective.
14May1877, Dissatisfaction With Turkey – The debate ended in a division on the 1st resolution, which merely expressed dissatisfaction with Turkey’s disregard of Ld. Derby’s first despatch…The Liberals all voted together, except the Irish, who have the Pope to please, and whose support is no compliment…
25Mar1878, A General Mad Hatter’s Tea-party – Ld. Salisbury succeeds Ld. Derby, Mr. Hardy goes to the Lords, and is succeeded at the War Office by Col. Stanley (very skilful of Dizzy, to keep on good terms with the Stanleys!), and there is a general Mad Hatter’s Tea-party — everybody moving up (or down) one.
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – In the House of Lords came off a horrid scene. Ld. Derby explicitly stated that a main cause of his resignation was its being said in the Cabinet that Cyprus would have to be taken, with or without the consent of Italy, our ally.
23Jul1878, More Derby-Salisbury Business – We talked of the horrid Derby-Salisbury business; Ld. Derby has found his mem. written at the time of his resignation, and fully bearing out what he has said, and has shown it to Ld. Granville. Whether he would have re-opened the personal matter, and crushed Lord Salisbury with the mem, I don’t know; but he has been requested by the Queen to let the subject alone.
20Feb1881, Lord Derby Very Agreeable – Good walk; Lord Derby very agreeable and full of humour; I never took him in that light before; but 10 to 1, if one met him a week hence, he would not know one from Adam. He even joined the Dss.’s youthful sports and did Irish brogue, etc., very well. Not a word of politics did he speak. I like the dignified kind old Duke of Cleveland, with his clever, ancient reminiscences.

 

Stanley, Frederick Arthur, 16th Earl of Derby (Captain Stanley until 1886)
26Aug1868, Electioneering – Emma and I drove to Grange Hotel to call on the Wilson Pattens, and saw Col. P. himself. He was quite moved at the notion of our calling upon them, apparently thinking his coalition with Captain Stanley against Cavendish would make bitter enemies of us all.
24May1873, Junket to Cassiobury – Had the junket of going to Cassiobury [FN: The house of Lord Essex.]. So seldom do we see new places, that I do enjoy it…The Powerscourts and Fredk. Stanleys are here. F. had to do birthday dinner at No. 11 and came here Sunday.
25Mar1878, A General Mad Hatter’s Tea-party – Ld. Salisbury succeeds Ld. Derby, Mr. Hardy goes to the Lords, and is succeeded at the War Office by Col. Stanley (very skilful of Dizzy, to keep on good terms with the Stanleys!), and there is a general Mad Hatter’s Tea-party — everybody moving up (or down) one.

 

Stanley of Alderley, Algernon Charles
19Jun1867, Luncheon with the Hon. and Rev. Stanley – and then the Hon. and Rev. Algernon Stanley [FN: Now Bishop of Emmaus, and Canon of St. Peter's at Rome], who used rather to like me. He has been Curate at Kidderminster under dear Mr. Claughton, and presents the bewildering spectacle of a High Church Stanley of Alderley. Liked him much.

 

Stanley of Alderley, Edward John, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley, 1st Baron Eddisbury
15Jun1863, Meeting Howard and Jowett – the Stanleys of Alderley (minus parents), the Dufferins, and others besides are here
09Apr1864, Viewing Herbert’s Painting with Lord F. – I went to tea at the Stanleys of Alderley ; pleasant enough. Very pleasant party at Ld. Palmerston’s.

 

Stanley of Alderley, Henrietta Maria (née Dillon-Lee)
23Feb1880, Burne-Jones and Matthew Arnold – D. at Ly. Stanley of Alderley’s, and had a P.B. [FN: I.e. Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.] neighbour in the shape of Burne-Jones the painter…After d. much talk with Matthew Arnold, who was interested about Alfred, whom he has lately met…

 

Stewart, Robert, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry (Lord Castlereagh)
14Jun1871, Talking With Lord Russell – No less (and no bigger) a person than Lord Russell took me in to dinner, and was delightful, with his dry humourous anecdotes. Said his 1st political recollection was Pitt’s going out of office ; also said Lord Castlereagh used to be very kind to him, but, on his displeasing him once, told him he ought to be whipped ! He remembers…

 

Stockmar, Baron
17Nov1872, Memoirs of Baron Stockmar “…sinks the Prince Consort into a second place.”

 

Stonor,Thomas, 3rd Baron Camoys
22Nov1874, Letters From R.C.s Keep Appearing – The whole thing reveals deep and wide differences among R.C.s; and, if Ld. Ripon reads the controversy, he surely must feel a little uncomfortable. Manning, by the bye, pronounces Ld. Camoys a heretic, if he sticks to what he says.

 

Stopford, Miss Horatia
10Sep1863, First Day as Maid-of-Honour – Miss Stopford has won my heart, and I wish she was to be my colleague (Miss Cathcart, a dread being, is to be)

 

Stratford, earldom of, see Byng

 

Stratford de Redcliffe, vicountancy of, see Canning

 

Strauss, author
05Dec1872, Uncle Wm. In High-Gee – … a horrible new atheistic book of Strauss’s

 

Strutt, Amelia Harriet (née Otter) (m: Edward Strutt, 1st Baron Belper)
09Jul1878, Ireland and its Improvement – Dined at Louisa Lady Ashburton’s who had miscounted her guests so that poor Ly. Belper was puss in the corner for a time. Sat between Ld. Melgund [FN: Afterwards 4th Earl of Minto and Viceroy of India.] and a very pleasant old Bishop of Limerick who stuck up for Ireland and its improvement,…

 

Strutt, Edward, 1st Baron Belper
09Jun1862, Red Letter Day at Cambridge – more or less well received, except wretched Ld. Belper, who got no applause

 

Strutt, John William, 3rd Baron Rayleigh of Terling Place
20Nov1868, Nominated at Bradford – Afterwards came a big luncheon, when he was very warmly cheered. We got home for dinner, and were met by the capital news of Frank’s and Mr. Strutt’s victory.
22Feb1872, Handsome and Love-lorn Hubert Parry – Dined at Portl. Pl., meeting Ly. A. Compton, Helen Gladstone, Mr. Strutt, the handsome and love-lorn Hubert Parry
07Dec1868, Another Proposed – He telegraphed “Ireland over ; another proposed.” This is exciting. I rode with Lord George, Louey, and Mr. Strutt. Empress chose to kick.
12Dec1870, A Very Pleasant Party – The party here is very pleasant. Mr. Balfour is a very pretty quaint tall boy, clever and funny ; Mr. Strutt [FN: Afterwards Lord Rayleigh, the great man of science. He married Mr. Balfour's sister.], a senior Wrangler, very taking and gentlemanlike

 

Strutt, Evelyn Georgiana Mary (née Balfour) (Lady Rayleigh) (m: 3rd Baron Rayleigh)
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – Went to see Alice Egerton and Gertrude Pennant. Gertrude and I talked politics… Dined with Mr. Balfour, Ly. Rayleigh entertaining.

 

Strzelecki, Sir Paul Edmund de
28May1868, Dined Swellissimus – Dined swellissimus at Ly. Cowper’s, meeting De Greys, Clarendons, Holfords, Ly. Cork, W. Cowpers, Mr. Wood, etc. Got so sleepy listening to old Count Strzlecki. . . afterwards that I wonder I did not roll off my chair with a crash.

 

Stuart, Lady Evelyn (née Sutherland-Leveson-Gower) (m: 12th Lord Blantyre)
12Jun1866, Prince Alfred Very Short – Ball at Lady Blantyre’s. Prince Alfred (who has just been created Duke of Edinburgh—a funny title) was there, looking somewhat handsome, but very short.
16Mar1867, A Visit to Chiswick – Emma and I drove to Chiswick. The Duchess was visiting Lady Blantyre, and we waited an hour for her.

 

Stuart-Wortley, see Wortley

 

Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie, James, 1nd Baron Wharncliffe, (father: Cissy Wortley, Lady Henry Scott)

 

Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie, John, 2nd Baron Wharncliffe, (father: Mrs. Talbot, Meriel’s mother-in-law)

 

Sturt, Henry Gerard, 1st Baron Alington
22Jul1879, Comments Around Gladstone Portrait – A Tory lady was looking at it, and said, “Why, it makes the old scoundrel look quite respectable!” when a voice behind her said, “Madam, I heard you call Mr. G. a scoundrel. Allow me to tell you I have known him from boyhood—at school, at college, and up to the present time: and I can only assure you that there is no one of more thorough religious principle and conduct.” The speaker is said to have been Sir Thos. Acland.

 

Sudley, Lord
20Jun1859, Pretty Enough – Ld. Sudley engaged me for a quadrille, which he performed with another lady

 

Sumner, Charles, American politician
11Nov1872, Sumner Describes Great Boston Fire – He was distressed at the horrible fire, almost on the Chicago scale, which is raging at Boston
12Nov1872, Sumner a Mighty Talker – sat and talked with him, or rather sat and listened to him, for a mighty talker is he

 

Sutherland, duchy of, see Sutherland-Leveson-Gower

 

Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Cromartie, 4th Duke of Sutherland (1851–1913)
07Jul1863, A Dance with Fred Cavendish – little Ld. Stafford, isn’t pretty and lookd delicate

 

Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Francis Mackenzie, 2nd Earl of Cromartie (1852–1893)
07Jul1863, A Dance with Fred Cavendish – his brother (who is called Ld. Macleod (sic, Mackenzie), I believe : his mother’s 2nd title) is a beauty

 

Sutherland Leveson-Gower, George Granville William, 3rd Duke of Sutherland
14Jul1863, A Good Recherché Ball – The D. of Sutherland and other young men played at leap-frog!
01Dec1864, A Visit from Sutherlands – The Duke and Duchess of Sutherland and a pug came. I cuddled rather with Lady Blanche, who is very nice.

 

Sutherland Leveson-Gower, Anne, Duchess of Sutherland (née Hay-Mackenzie)
16Jul1863, Last Clever Breakfast – Last clever breakfast, to which came the Dss. of Sutherland and Ly. Herbert, Dr. Acland, Dean Trench, “Garibaldi’s Englishman,” Ld. Frederic Cavendish, and a china dealer
22Jun1865, Alice Arbuthnot Killed by Lightening – I went with M. and Mrs. Talbot and Edward to Chiswick, which the Duchess of Sutherland had lent for a P.M.W. fete.

 

Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, Harriet Elizabeth Georgiana, Dowager Duchess of Sutherland (née Howard) (sister of Lord F’s mother)
04Jun1862, Kensington Museum – We saw there the Dow. Duchess of Sutherland, with her youngest son Lord Ronald (Gower)
07Jul1863, A Dance with Fred Cavendish – a breakfast given by the Dow. Dss. of Sutherland at Chiswick, meeting the Prince and Princess
12Apr1864, Luncheon with Garibaldi – Garibaldi being introduced to different people by the Dow. Dss. of Sutherland
05Feb1866, Arnt Suverland is ill – They are all uneasy about the Dow. Duchess of Sutherland’s health. Instead of the unwieldy title I might perhaps adopt Freddy’s “Arnt Suverland.” But I have always held her in awe, in spite of, or because of, her gentle, Royal sort of kindness.
16Mar1867, A Visit to Chiswick – Emma and I drove to Chiswick. The Duchess was visiting Lady Blantyre, and we waited an hour for her. She looked very well and queenly, and made me as shy as usual !
03Mar1868, Smart Little Party – Smart little party with singing at Stafford House that we were obliged to go to, against my will; the Prince and Princess there, she wonderfully well, and walking with only a little stiffness; I believe she expects another baby!
25May1869, The White May is Coming Out – China went on merrily, specially the clearing out of a wonderful ménagerie of odds and ends, knick-knacks and gimcracks, from the cabinet in the 1st state-room. [FN: This was china brought from Chiswick and now being placed at Chatsworth. Chiswick was not inhabited by any of the Duke's relations after the Duchess of Southerland's death.]
24Jun1870, Return to Chiswick – I drove with Lou to poor, silent, altered Chiswick (after the death of the Dow. Duchess Sutherland). The Prince of Wales has it for the present, and is going to give a big breakfast there to-morrow ; but all was deserted to-day. His children come and play here constantly

 

Sydney, earldom of, see Townshend

 

T [TOP]

Tait, Archibald Campbell, Bishop of London, Archbishop of Canterbury
14Jan1859, Bishop of London – his charge is everywhere reckoned admirable : temperate, wise, careful
11Apr1864, Garibaldi Arrives – with Mary and Helen went after dinner to the Bishop of London’s, to hear a woman read (not particularly well) passages (mostly beautiful) from Shakespeare, Tennyson, etc.
08Nov1864, An Excellent Lecture – Instead of Butler, Fred finished to me a very thoughtful, earnest, and, I think, excellent lecture by the Bishop of London
27Feb1865, Ladies’ Diocesan Association Inaugural Meeting – I attended the Bishop of London’s inaugural meeting of the “Ladies’ Diocesan Association,” which he set on foot last year
05May1865, The Bishop’s Children – his little children are so brought up in the midst of work for the poor, that one of the tiny girls was heard saying : “When I am six, I shall have a ward to visit !”
22Jul1869, Matters are All Arranged – The political thunderstorm has entirely cleared the air ! The Archbishop of Canterbury has been the moving spring of influence that has brought it all about : it is immensely to his credit, as he is no lover of the Bill.

 

Talbot, earldom of, see Chetwynd-Talbot

 

Talbot, Bertram Chetwynd (Meriel’s 4th, 1865-1936)
19May1865, Walking Unchaperoned – Saw Meriel who is on her legs and very well : the baby went his 1st walk to-day, into the Abbey ! which all the four have been to see first thing.
02Mar1866, Glimpses of the Deep, Wide Misery – last but not least, upon George, Mary, Agnes, and Bertram Talbot; who were all at home and delighted to see me… They were sitting like olive-branches round about the table, at tea: all blooming, merry, and rosy.

 

Talbot, Caroline Agnes (Meriel’s 3rd, 1863-1930)
07Jan1864, Meriel’s Third Baby – the comfort and delight of driving to dear George St., going up to the baby’s room, and having my 1st sight of her, the same fair skin, shapely little head, and besides tiny taper hands ; but she is a great deal larger and has a prettier mouth
02Mar1866, Glimpses of the Deep, Wide Misery – last but not least, upon George, Mary, Agnes, and Bertram Talbot; who were all at home and delighted to see me… They were sitting like olive-branches round about the table, at tea: all blooming, merry, and rosy.
07Jun1873, Shah Goes to France – One of these days the Gladstones had the Shah to tea, and little Mary and Agnes Talbot were fetched upstairs to look at him. What shd he do but pat them on the cheeks and say, “Tres jolies,” to their infinite excitement. “He patted me twice,” quoth Agnes, “because I’m fair; so he is sure to ask for me as his 4th wife.”

 

Talbot, Caroline Jane (née Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie) (Meriel’s mother-in-law) (dau: 1st Baron Wharncliffe)
29May1856, Her Majesty’s Birthday- in a traffic jam to see the illuminations
07Feb1857, A New Baby – helping Lady Lyttelton
23Apr1857, Convalescence at Brighton – Mrs. Talbot came up again. A lovely apparition sent to be a moment’s ornament
16May1857, Falconhurst, Kent – The Lyttelton’s visit for more convalescence
16Jun1859, Worth Coming to London – Mrs. Talbot took us to George St., where we dined
30Dec1861, He taught me how to reign – Granny heard from Mrs. Talbot a most characteristic and touching saying of the Queen’s
10May1863, Four Sermons – went with her and Ldy Wharncliffe and daughter to a delightful, hearty, congregational Service at S. Peter’s
17Jun1870, The Education Bill – Mrs. Talbot came to see me, and we went across to see Lavinia’s [FN: Her sister Lavinia was about to be married to Edward Talbot, afterwards Bishop of Winchester.] presents at No. 11. Hearing my voice in the hall, who should call me into his study but the Prime Minister! to ask me what I thought of the Government proceedings last night about the Education Bill.

 

Talbot, Edward Keble (son: Lavinia)
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – Warden minor [FN: E. K. Talbot, now Superior of the Anglican Community of the Resurrection.] a jolly, darling ugly-mug with red curls, very like Bob ; F. took to him much the most of the two!
12Dec1880, Aunt Looty – The boys are big bouncers: Edward exactly like Bob, with Warden’s little blue eyes ! no beauty certainly, except lovely reddish hair; Neville a handsome, dark-eyed fellow, rather like Gertrude’s little Charlie.

 

Talbot, Edward Stuart, bishop, (m: sister Lavinia)
26May1857, Nests and Eggs – two rides with Edward, on a little mouthless, perverse creature, whom I force with some difficulty to follow my way, not her own
24Feb1861, Tutor Seems Bitten with Horrible Essays – Edward’s tutor Curgenven seems bitten with these horrible “Essays and Reviews”
16Dec1864, Future Bishop Talbot – a nice walk with Edward Talbot, who strikes one immensely with his thoughtful, powerful mind, coupled with such heartfelt, earnest reverence and deep feeling. I think he must turn out great.
09Dec1872, Plans for Keble College Chapel – We dined at Portland Place, meeting the dear Keble couple, who showed off the plans of the Chapel, which are excellent
01Jul1869, Edward Talbot at Kebel College – The great news of Edward Talbot’s appointment to the Headship of “Keble College” at Oxford is given out now, and is delightful: such a compliment to a man of 25! Mr. Liddon was privately asked to take it, but refused.
22Jun1870, Story of a Tragic Romance – we all went to Keble College. The quad was all dotted over with pretty bright groups of people ; old Edward was plunging about 50 ways at once, and enthusiastic friends kept turning up…Considering the College is now nothing but rooms, being minus chapel, library and hall, it is very well-looking..Towards 11 the procession formed ; and, after securing places in the temporary chapel, we flew to the door to see it streaming round the quad. Beautiful it was, with its white clergy and choir, its scarlet Doctors and Bishops, its golden-robed Chancellor.
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – Edward Talbot (who with Lavinia was at the Rectory) came down at 8, and came to our room. The night had been profoundly quiet: nothing swallowed; no pain. Except Newmany’s name, which has all along been oftenest on her lips,
08May1877, The Wortley-Talbot Wedding – Seldom were seen more tall and beautiful people assembled together: bride and bridegroom, Lady Brownlow, Lady Pembroke, the Shrewsbury daughters (all unmarried), etc.: not to speak of the three 6 feet 2 in. Clergy who officiated, Stephen Lawley, Mr. Arthur Talbot, and Edwarden [FN: Edward, Warden of Keble.].
07Apr1879, Litany at S. Paul’s – Went East straight from Cannon St., joined Mazy in S. Paul’s Cathedral, and attended the solemn 1 o’clock Litany, hymn and sermon. Edward Talbot’s Mr. Holland preached—a great, original, fervent sermon;
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – The most notable event of the week was the arrival on a morning call of no less a personage than Cardinal Newman! An historical event it was, to see him sitting in the house of the Warden of Keble College…His business was to bring Edwarden some letters of Keble, which he didn’t like to trust thro’ the post; and he had to explain certain erasures he had made in them. This he did by word of mouth, Edward being at home…

 

Talbot, Eustace (Meriel’s 7th, 1873-1905)

 

Talbot, Evelyn (Meriel’s 8th, 1873-1962)

 

Talbot, George John (Meriel’s 1st, 1861-1938)
25Aug1862, Tiny George – goes staggering about, jabbering and laughing triumphantly, with one arm high above his head, just as if he was hoisting a sail
07Jan1864, Meriel’s Third Baby – On my becoming a horse for him to ride, he immediately became a tiger to jump upon me. When he was consulted as to the baby’s name he at once suggested Bison.
23Jun1865, Granny Reads a Picture Book – To St. St., where Great-Granny was entertaining with a picture-book little George and Mary. Dined there, and chaperoned Aunt C. afterwards to Ly. Windsor’s.
02Mar1866, Glimpses of the Deep, Wide Misery – last but not least, upon George, Mary, Agnes, and Bertram Talbot; who were all at home and delighted to see me… They were sitting like olive-branches round about the table, at tea: all blooming, merry, and rosy.
19Jun1866, The Fate of the Bill – London – Little George 5 to-day ; I gave him a carpenter’s box.

 

Talbot, Gwendolen (Meriel’s 9th, 1877-1960)

 

Talbot, John Edward (Meriel’s 6th, 1870-1937)

 

Talbot, John Gilbert, (m: sister Meriel)
26Feb1856, Macaulay’s Essay – St. Leonard’s – At 6 Johnnie read to Mamma, Mrs. Talbot, M. and I some of Macaulay’s Essay on Hallam
08Mar1857, Christ Church, Oxford – Johnny appeared, in his cap and gown to please me, for he says the men of Ch. Ch. are not wont to walk about in them, though every other college does.
27May1862, John Talbot is Beaten for Kidderminster – beaten by 8; John has made a famous fight, spoken admirably, and covered himself with laurels
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – I didn’t stay out the prize recitations, but got escorted home by John
13Jul1865, Up to the Ears in Electionums – Alas ! alas ! poor old John is beaten hollow at Malmesbury. Willy has come in for Chester, which I am glad of.
04Jul1870, Parenthetic Dinner – Went to the House to hear F. move his amendment. Parenthetic dinner at J.G.T.’s, where were Sir Walter and Sarina James.
18Mar1872, Gladstone Not a Jesuit in Disguise – A cosy scratch dinner of Uncle Dick, Prime Minister and Mrs., Mesd. Talbot and Johnny
30Apr1872, Visiting the Kent Penitentiary – London – Had a nice interesting expedition with the J. G. T.’s to see the Kent Penitentiary, [FN: Founded by John Talbot.] which M. calls Johnny’s eldest child : he started it the year they were married, after hearing a sermon on the duty of all to do something for fallen women.
11Mar1873, Gladstone’s Finest Speech – debate [FN: On the Irish University Bill]. up sprung Uncle W. and made “the finest speech” of his life..Old M. was in Sir Ch. Russell’s box [FN: "Sir" in the Diary : but she probably refers to Lord Charles Russell, then Serjeant-at-Arms.] and greatly delighted with the speech: wigged Johnny for voting against.
23Jul1878, More Derby-Salisbury Business – Of course this is under pressure from Dizzy — the Queen could not be responsible—and most base it is of him. One can’t give the reason, and I can see Johnny [FN: I.e. her brother-in-law J. G. Talbot, then at the Board of Trade.] and his colleagues conclude that the mem. is a figment, and that Ld. Derby had delirium tremens or something of the sort when he resigned.

 

Talbot, Lavinia, (née Lyttelton) (her sister, Winnie) (m:Edward Talbot)
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – I was sent to George Street, to dress with Mamma and Winnie.
24Jun1859, Those Old Times – We took Winny to a little child’s concern at Ly. De Mauley’s
27Aug1863, Riding the Hunter – I then rode on the hunter, with Lavinia and Bob, and had the satisfaction of keeping on in spite of a very lively kick
16Sep1863, Sedate Pleasures – I have never seen them really carried off their legs with excitement, or anything like it
27Jan1866, A Charming Ride – began “The Heart of Midlothian” to the girls. Had a charming ride on Punchy with Lavinia on Empress and Georgina on Ossa
28May1867, Very Mad Did I Feel – I was to have taken poor pussy-cat [FN: Her sister Lavinia who was ill.]; but we must give up all thoughts of her coming out this year. She isn’t allowed to get up at all yet.
02Jun1869, Dined Dullissimus Major – Workhouse with Lavinia. Spencer breakfasts every morning with us. We had some snug reading, and went together at 5 to the R. Academy in its fine new rooms. Some good Millais and Landseers.
17Jun1869, Irish Church Bill Second Reading – Oh dear, dear ! political life has quite dropt out amid this excitement [FN: I.e. of her sister Lavinia's engagement to Edward Talbot: and her younger sister May's very brief engagement to Edward Denison...]
17Jun1870, The Education Bill – Mrs. Talbot came to see me, and we went across to see Lavinia’s [FN: Her sister Lavinia was about to be married to Edward Talbot, afterwards Bishop of Winchester.] presents at No. 11. Hearing my voice in the hall, who should call me into his study but the Prime Minister! to ask me what I thought of the Government proceedings last night about the Education Bill.
23Jun1870, Opening Ceremony for Keble College – Darling Lavinia was close to me—what a never-to-be-forgotten thing this day will be to her! Dr. Pusey brought Lavinia gracefully and kindly into his speech, which nearly did for poor little pussy-cat.
04Jan1872, Impressions of Barbados – Darling Mother Keble [FN: Her sister Lavinia, wife of the Warden of Keble.] 23 to-day.
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – Edward Talbot (who with Lavinia was at the Rectory) came down at 8, and came to our room. The night had been profoundly quiet: nothing swallowed; no pain. Except Newmany’s name, which has all along been oftenest on her lips,
10Mar1879, Fire at Granville’s – Lavinia busy in Committee, sending out circulars about the Ladies’ Hall, so Mary and I went off to luncheon with Willy Grenfell [FN: Now Lord Desborough.]…
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – darling Lavinia as brisk and strong as if she had nothing to do with the thumping fellow of 10 weeks old, by name Neville Stuart,[FN: Now Bishop of Pretoria.] who kicks and crows upstairs. Nevertheless she is nursing him 5 times a day; but whips about the town and does all manner of jobs between whiles.
15Mar1880, H. Gladstone Contests Middlesex – Herbert Gladstone has been pounced upon to contest Middlesex ! Lavinia, Mazy, Sybella, and I went to hear him speak at a meeting at Acton Saturday: he did famously well, and Alfred made a capital little speech at the end, backing him: so like Papa he looked ! only so young and buoyant.

 

Talbot, Margaret (Meriel’s 10th, 1878-1974)
22Jul1879, Comments Around Gladstone Portrait – came off an excellent P.M.W. [FN: Parochial Mission Women.] treat at Ashridge — the entertainers, Ly. Lothian (Constance), Ly. Brownlow, Ly. Pembroke, and Margaret Talbot, [age 9 1/2 months] a glorious sight to see, among all the good homely bodies….

 

Talbot, Mary (Meriel’s 2nd, 1862-1897)
07Jan1864, Meriel’s Third Baby – Of all dear couples George and Mary are certainly the dearest
02Mar1866, Glimpses of the Deep, Wide Misery – last but not least, upon George, Mary, Agnes, and Bertram Talbot; who were all at home and delighted to see me… They were sitting like olive-branches round about the table, at tea: all blooming, merry, and rosy.
07Jun1873, Shah Goes to France – One of these days the Gladstones had the Shah to tea, and little Mary and Agnes Talbot were fetched upstairs to look at him. What shd he do but pat them on the cheeks and say, “Tres jolies,” to their infinite excitement. “He patted me twice,” quoth Agnes, “because I’m fair; so he is sure to ask for me as his 4th wife.”
09Dec1878, Little Mary Talbot and the E.Q. – Little Mary takes no end of interest in politics, and said to me, “I should like to hear the Government side* well put. Papa, you know, does not get up foreign politics; indeed, I have beaten him myself about them!”

 

Talbot, May (dau: Lavinia)
12Dec1880, Aunt Looty – The following scene took place as I was reading by the fire and she came up to me. May: “Aunt Looty got crinkles on oo forehead!” Aunt Looty: “Yes, and I’m afraid they won’t rub out.” May: “What, not with wingy-wubber?” and she fetched a bit..

 

Talbot, Dame Meriel Lucy (Meriel’s 5th, 1866-1956)
16Nov1865, Meriel Expecting No. 5 – she looks very well, though, alas ! No. 5 hopes to arrive next June. It is a sad trial to the poor old thing, who would stop very willingly at 4 ; and would have been satisfied to have no children at all, which is all but inconceivable to me.
15Jul1866, Meriel Talbot, A Stalwart Child – the christening of darling “Meriel Lucy Talbot,” Fred gave her a fine Bible and Prayer Book in one, which, if she is a stalwart child, she may be able to lift in 10 years’ time.

 

Talbot, Meriel Sarah (née Lyttelton) (her dear sister Meriel, M.)
02Nov1854, Rides with Uncle William – Meriel has taken wonderfully to that mode of exercise ; indeed who wouldn’t enjoy long rides over a country new to us, with Agnes, and sometimes Uncle William!!! or Henry
22Jul1855, Mamma’s Birthday – and on that day moreover was Meriel confirmed by Forbes, Bishop of Brechi… She went to Falconhurst, Mrs. Talbot’s place, on Friday
22Dec1855, An Enchanting House – schoolroom (for the studies of M., Georgy,(Her fourth brother, after wards always known as Spencer) Winny, and me
26Apr1856, After the Ball – M. acknowledges that when she saw us set off, she and Edward agreed that they would have liked to go. She is such an odd old creature, this is the last chance she could have had, for next year she will be too old
08May1859, Park Too Beautiful – We went, 8 strong, excluding that most pintoed M., up Sparry’s and Obelisks Hill
18Jun1859, An Attenuated Baboon – M. dined with Granny
20Jun1859, Pretty Enough – M. danced once. It was a brilliant ball, for them as danced
24Jun1859, Those Old Times – taken by Cousin Jane to the C. Palace, where she heard “Israel in Egypt”
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – Meriel’s very first ball
08Jul1859, Have Enjoyed This Ball More Than Any Other – The Comte de Paris dances with Meriel by mistake. The fact was he had taken her for me!
29Jan1862, House Party at Lord Denbigh’s – Newnham Paddox – M. dancing again, but looking amazingly matronly
14May1862, One Was Amused – Meriel and Mrs. Talbot were there, tho’ not within speaking distance
25May1862, In a Hansom – who shd we get out in the very eye of but Lord Cowper, who was probably shocked at the sight
23Jun1862, Charles Bowled Out – Went with Meriel, Mrs. T., Albert, Edwd. and John, to see the beginning of the University match at Lord’s
15Aug1862, A Tiff With The Grim One – The Misses Rogers called on M. and were gt audience to Baby, who looked her best
16May1863, The Drawing Room – six hours vs. one hour (for entrée people) to curtsey to the Queen
13Jun1863, America: North vs South – connected with old M.’s engagement, and our very shy and very lovely visit here just aftr
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – Darling old Meriel is 23 to-day
07Jan1864, Meriel’s Third Baby – Osborne itself puts on a less awful face ; for old Meriel has a calm good judgment and serenity about her that infect me
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – got to London early enough to have another 20 minutes of M., which rejoiced my heart
14Apr1864, Foolish and Bewildered – Darling Meriel came to Carlton Terrace, saw Ly. Louisa, and took me to the station.
20Apr1864, Third Waiting Ends – I dined with old Meriel, 0 so snugly ; and had the nicest of talks with her, and with Mrs. Talbot.
21Apr1864, We Are Engaged – He dined here : as did my old Meriel…. I wrote to all my darling boys : even to my little fellows at Hagley.
30May1864, Riding the Donkey-cart – so we drove off in triumph, I conducting and the Mesds. Talbot looking on in convulsions of laughter.
11Jun1864, Smashing the Ice – then to St. St., where we saw Grauntcoque , Atie. P., Papa and Meriel, and I found the seeing them rather strange and upsetting : feeling that it wasn’t me.
30Jul1864, Return to Hagley – interviews with my 2 new brothers, and with the Mesdames Talbot, who turned up unbeknown as I was sitting exhausted in my petticoat waiting to be robed in smart array for going home
05Aug1864, Learning Glynnese Glossary – Fred is getting on buckish and familiar terms with M., to my delight.
21Oct1864, A Visit from Meriel and a Ball – a red-letter day for me : the arrival of my old Meriel with John and Mrs. Talbot. M. is not looking well, but she is.
13Dec1864, Decorating the House – Thence to our splendid mansion, No. 21 Carlton House Terrace, where we met my old Meriel and Mrs. Talbot, and Trollope, the builder-and-furnisher’s man.
26Dec1864, We Kept Christmas – and monster dinner of all the creatures—counting Fred, we make up the dozen, but oh for Meriel and John!
10Mar1865, St. Anne’s Mission and Diamonds on My Head – my Meriel, Mrs. Talbot, Agnes, and I agreed to send him a hamper among us ; and M. and I got the things after luncheon ; viz. tea, arrowroot, tapioca, sago, grapes, concentrated beef tea, currant jelly, a dozen of port wine, and a bottle of brandy
08May1865, Our Own New Home – I spent some time with M. in the afternoon ; then we dressed here, dined at Dev. House, and returned here at about half past 10.
19May1865, Walking Unchaperoned – Saw Meriel who is on her legs and very well: the baby went his 1st walk to-day, into the Abbey! which all the four have been to see first thing.
20May1865, Dined at Lord Wharncliffe’s – saw Meriel who was dressed and downstairs, and looking very nice and well
24May1865, Sunday Jackets but Rather Bored – George Street in the morning : M. was to be churched to-day.
22Jun1865, Alice Arbuthnot Killed by Lightening – I went with M. and Mrs. Talbot and Edward to Chiswick, which the Duchess of Sutherland had lent for a P.M.W. fete.
24Jun1865, Be Civil to the Constituents – Old M. is bereaved like me, John having gone off high gee a prospect of getting in for Malmesbury. She picked me up at 4 in her nice open carriage, and we dropped cards.
16Nov1865, Meriel Expecting No. 5 – She looks very well, though, alas ! No. 5 hopes to arrive next June. It is a sad trial to the poor old thing, who would stop very willingly at 4 ; and would have been satisfied to have no children at all, which is all but inconceivable to me.
13Feb1866, The Lower Class and the Upper Class – found myself with the Mesd. Talbot in their delightful soup-kitchen, which they have set up in Westminster. Poor people (not beggars) are given tickets, on showing which and paying a sum not exceeding 2d. they get good meat, soup, beef-tea, or pudding of at least twice the value of what they pay.
18Feb1866, Cockney Damsels – we poked in upon M. and then pounded off to S. Paul’s, where was a big congregation. Two pretty baptisms which brought tears to my eyes, so foolishly did I long to see a baby of our own christened.
15Mar1866, Ly. Augusta and Dean Stanley – Had luncheon with M. at Ly. Augusta Stanley’s. I should think no couple in the world were so unlike as Dean Stanley and his wife.
14Apr1866, To the Crystal Palace with Meriel – I drove with the John Talbots to the Crystal Palace; that is, alone with M. there, and with all coming home. It was very nice. We squabbled over politics a little.
16Apr1866, Terrified Toryism – Having been poked up by a sneering article in the Spectator upon the “Xtian Year,” I wrote a little rejoinder; but F. and the Mesds. Talbot, tho’ they think it rather good, think I had better not send it! I went in lonely dignity to Ly. Taunton’s ball; Sir Walter Farquhar poured terrified Toryism into my ear.
19Apr1866, The Longleys at Lambeth – I drove with old M. to Campden Hill, and to call on the Longleys at glorious old Lambeth which I never saw before.
16May1866, Milman, Fawcett, Ecce Homo – The poor Westminster bank where all Meriel’s kitchen money and other charities bank, has shut up like the others….We dined at Ld. Taunton’s, meeting Dean Milman and Mr. Fawcett.
02Mar1867, John Parry and German Reed – I went with Grauntcoquitty, Meriel, and Mrs. Robartes (very childish of such old matrons and maids!) to see John Parry and German Reed. Laughed till I was exhausted !
04Jun1867, Reynolds and Gainsboroughs – M., Granny, and I went in M.’s open carriage to the Exhibition ; we did little but the Sir Joshua Reynolds and Gainsboroughs, but spent a good while there, Granny as fresh and pleased over it as possible, and recognising many rolling-collared, swathed-necked, tight-coated, knee-breeched people from her own recollection of them.
31Mar1870, Papa’s Turns 53 – Papa 53. Meriel and I have clubbed to give him an arm-chair for his office,[FN: Lord Lyttelton was Chief Commissioner of Endowed Schools.] which the stingy Government don’t allow him.
11Mar1872,Monstrous ClothesDrawingroom, to which I went with Lou, diverging to the common herd in the Palace and joining M.
30May1872, The New Singer, Emma Albani – London – I went to see Dev. House; and M. had the treat of going to the Opera (Royal Box) with Emma, and hearing the new singer Albani. A nice-looking but rather skinny and school-girly creature with a lovely voice.
13Jul1872, Eton Beating Harrow at Cricket – All 8 Lyttelton brothers were on the ground
25Feb1873, Shot Albert’s Quondam Tutor – Went with old M. to a special Committee at the House in hopes of hearing Papa examined about Endowed Schools…
11Mar1873, Gladstone’s Finest Speech – debate [FN: On the Irish University Bill]. up sprung Uncle W. and made “the finest speech” of his life..Old M. was in Sir Ch. Russell’s box [FN: "Sir" in the Diary : but she probably refers to Lord Charles Russell, then Serjeant-at-Arms.] and greatly delighted with the speech: wigged Johnny for voting against.
21Mar1875, Her Sister Mary Dies – other hymns which I thought I might repeat to our darling, and I had chosen “There is a green hill far away,” which she so loved to hear Spencer sing — Alfred was playing soft, solemn music, and the pathos of it was bringing floods of tears — when Meriel came down and gently told us the end had come. Not a sound, not a pang: the breathing died away imperceptibly as Uncle B. read the last prayer.
15May1875, Wales Children Like Anybody Else – Saturday the 15th I came to Chatsworth with Papa and Sybella; F. having gone down Friday, when I stayed on to go with M., Mrs. T., Gertrude, and Willy to hear “S. Paul” at Exeter Hall, which was glorious. Endless dawdling journey.
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – Afterwards we both with M. went to see the recumbent figure of Papa by Forsyth for Worcester Cathedral. It is a fine thing, and has much likeness, tho’ Forsyth never saw him. To tea with the Wortleys, high gee Margaret’s engagement to Reginald Talbot; a handsome couple; also Constance Lawley’s to Eustace Vesey, after some years’ attachment, he in India, lately returned. Dined with the G. 0. Trevelyans, meeting the Secularist Education firebrand Mr. Morley..
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – Dined with Bob at Meriel’s and went with him to a Philharmonic, where the music was soothingly easy. Overture to “Midsummer Night’s Dream” the chief delight.
Final Entries – On Saturday, May 6th, 1882, I (Meriel) went after dinner to 21 C.H.T. and found Lucy, the F. Egertons, and Alfred. Lucy was in good spirits…

 

Talbot, Neville (son: Lavinia)
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – darling Lavinia as brisk and strong as if she had nothing to do with the thumping fellow of 10 weeks old, by name Neville Stuart,[FN: Now Bishop of Pretoria.] who kicks and crows upstairs. Nevertheless she is nursing him 5 times a day; but whips about the town and does all manner of jobs between whiles.

 

Taplin, James P., botanist
20July1865, No-poperyums – I walked about the kitchen-garden with the Duke, Fred, and the scientific Mr. Taplin ; and ate a good deal of fruit.

 

Taunton, baronetcy of, see Labouchere

 

Teck, Duchess of, Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge
12Oct1872, Good Fat Princess Mary – Eddies returned from a do-ment at Lytham. The Tecks opened a park near Southport, and went to see Liverpool : great crowds and enthusiasm, which seems to have rather astonished and much delighted good fat Princess Mary .
19Mar1864, Sibyl Grant’s Wedding – I being in waiting, failing 2 absent ones, stood on the steps of the Throne, just behind the fat backs of the Dss. of Cambridge and Prss. Mary

 

Teck, Princess Mary (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes) (m: King George V)
27May1867, Royal Babies – Lonodon – A little Teck princess, and a Dudley son-and-heir are just born ; the latter a good deal the biggest event of the two [FN: So perhaps it seemed at the time. But the "little Teck princess" is now Queen of England (1927).]

 

Telegraph, Atlantic Cable, Telephone, Technology
18Aug1858, The Atlantic Telegraph – The first message arrived in 36 minutes by the Atlantic telegraph: “England and America are united. Glory to God in the Highest, and on earth peace, goodwill towards men.” Amen, from the bottom of my heart!
01Jun1865, Transatlantic Cable – 1,800 miles of which are coiled up on board the Great Eastern … I have brought home a bit of the electric cord ; it is about the thickness of my middle finger, and consists of 7 copper wires enclosed in 5 layers of gutta-percha.
04Sep1865, More News on the Atlantic Cable – have I ever mentioned what was amiss with the Atlantic cable? It broke in mid-Atlantic, from fraying against a part of the machinery, while being hauled in to mend a fault
26Sep1865, Lou and Frank are Married – P.S.—Lord Granville was married to his 18-year-old bride to-day : and they telegraphed congratulations, which were returned.
28Jul1866, Transatlantic Telegraph – After 2 failures last year and in ’58, the Transatlantic telegraph cable has been successfully laid, and had its shore end landed in America yesterday. Cyrus Field is the man who has accomplished this.
11Sep1866, £1 Per Word – The 2 Atlantic telegraphs are now in perfect order. They charge £1 a word for messages, and yet they pay enormously.
28Sep1867, The New Steam-Plough – Walked to see the new steam-plough, which did remind me vividly of Tennyson’s old farmer’s description : “Huzzin and maazin the blessed fealds wi’ the divil’s own teàm.” However, in spite of a hitch or two, it did manage to do 4 deep furrows at a time
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – Sun. evening a wretched new craze called a Telephone was brought into play, and F. kept at work shouting down it for a long time; on the whole a failure.
03Oct1881, New Marvel: A Telephone – That enchanting new marvel, a telephone, has been put up, whereby Castle and Rectory converse ad libitum. Uncle W., who is in some respects the greatest Tory out, will have nothing to say to it.

 

Temple, Beatrice (née Lascelles) (Lord F.’s cousin)
08Jul1868, To Brussels – B. [FN: Beatrice Lascelles, sister of Lady Edward Cavendish, afterwards wife of Archbishop Temple.] joined us at Charing X. at 7.15 ; we had a perfect passage from Dover to Calais
27Mar1870, Mr. Liddon’s Sermon – London – B. was in great excitement over Mr. Liddon’s sermon in S. James’ : the crowds to hear him are tremendous.
31Jul1876, Improvements to Althorp Estate – with Papa, in 1863, when he hunted with great enjoyment on a famous hunter of Spencer’s called Pale-Ale, and affronted Spencer by blaming the horse for refusing a brook. “My dear George, you rode him at it with a loose rein—you never put his head at it!” “Well, all I know is, my old hunter would have gone over it if I had put his tail at it!

 

Temple, Emily (née Lamb, also Lady Cowper) (m: Lord Palmerston) (Lady Palmerston, Lady Pam)
17May1862, Amusing Squash – Amusing squash at Lady Palmerston’s, saw Ld. Shaftesbury sporting his new Garter
21Jun1862, Fantastic Hair Dressing – Party at Ly. Palmerston’s, where was the Viceroy of Egypt, an acute-looking fat man with one eye, and much less of the animal look than the Japanese, etc.
02May1863, The Prince of Wales Bows – Ly. Pam’s party very full
27May1865, An Amusing Party with the Palmerston’s – Wound up with Lady Pam’s [FN: Lady Palmerston.] ; an amusing party ; Lord P. looked very old and stiff and shaky.
19Oct1865, Lord Palmerston Has Died – It is piteous to think of poor old Lady Palmerston. She wished him to give up office in the summer.

 

Temple, Frederick, Bishop of Exeter, Archbishop of Canterbury (m: Beatrice Lascelles)
16Feb1870, The Poverty of London – The Bp. of Exeter was at the party, to B.’s intense delight, for she worships him. [FN: Dr. Temple, whom "B." (Beatrice Lascelles) afterwards married.] He told her he had no hope but that opposition would follow him to his dying day ; and that it was a great grief to offend so many good men. He looks brave and cheerful nevertheless.
09May1873, Huges and Manning – Meeting of the “Provident Knowledge Society,” a new thing, likely to be very useful in puffing and explaining P.O. Savings Banks, Govt. investments, penny banks, etc. Ld. Derby presided, and the Bp of Exeter, Mr. Th. Hughes…
13Apr1882, Visiting Exeter – My Fred had to go off to Dublin. We set off together at 7.40, and I came to Exeter,[FN: I.e. the Bishop's Palace.] getting here in time to sit down to dinner before 8. Little Frederic Temple, a fine bouncing fair rosy fellow, with round blue eyes: the baby a very pretty dot

 

Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (Lord Palmerston)
13May1863, Alone in a Cab – had the honour of going to a wonderfully select ball at Pam’s, to meet the Prince and Princess
12Sep1863, Beginning to Like Court Life – his beauty much impaired by particularly bad slate-coloured false teeth
09Apr1864, Viewing Herbert’s Painting with Lord F. – I went to tea at the Stanleys of Alderley ; pleasant enough. Very pleasant party at Ld. Palmerston’s.
19Oct1865, Lord Palmerston Has Died – He would have been 81 to-morrow ; and it is wonderful to think of a man’s dying in office who was born before the fall of the old French monarchy, and was in office before Uncle William was born.
24Oct1865, Old Accounts of Wellington’s Death – This death of Lord Palmerston’s makes nothing like the same impression that that (Duke of Wellington’s funeral) did, or the Prince’s.
22Feb1866, Funds for Princess Helena – Then Uncle Wm. delivered “a fine panegyric” on Lord Palmerston, proposing a monument to him in the Abbey.

 

Tennyson, Lord Alfred
12Feb1862, Tennyson on the Prince – Tennyson has written some beautiful lines on the Prince
28Aug1864, A Book by Newman – reading the evening 2nd Lesson and Psalms, and a little “Christian Year.” Before luncheon I read him Tennyson’s new poem, “Enoch Arden,” which we both liked extremely : I think I shd put it next to “Guinevere.”
08Jul1871, Lord Tennyson: Rat-Taily Hair – At Downing Street I was introduced to Tennyson, a dirty man with opium-glazed eyes and rat-taily hair hanging down his back. He asked if Papa still translated, and when I said his only original compositions were comic, said he had never seen them. It tickled me, the notion of “The Tale of the Sewers,” “Gongenbühl, Gig-and-Buhl,” etc. in print. He rhapsodized about various waterfalls.

 

Thalber, Sigismond, composer, pianist
02Jul1863, A Northern Yankee – Beautiful select concert at the Aumales’, Mario, Grisi, Alboni and Delle Sedie sang, and Thalberg played

 

Thesiger, Frederic Augustus, 2nd Baron Chelmsford
05May1879, Queen Called Over the Coals – London – A horrid debate in the H. of Commons brought on by Mr. Dillwyn, who gave notice of a motion blaming the Queen herself for certain letters and telegrams she has sent…It is much believed that she has used undue influence in support of Sir Bartle and Ld. Chelmsford; but if she has, who is to blame?

 

Thiers, Marie Joseph Louis Adolphe, President of France
07Jun1873, Shah Goes to France – The Shah went off to France on Saturday, having pretty well tired out King, Lords, and Commons. Even the Prince of Wales is said to be dead beat. The French are going to make the best splash they can, but how poor, with no National Anthem, no flag, and nothing but a mushroom President.

 

Thompson, Mr.
24Jun1865, Be Civil to the Constituents – He especially flattered me by strongly advising that I should go with my Fred into the Division during the autumn that we might be civil to the constituents. I wrote the necessary troll to F. instantly

 

Thomson, William (Bishop of Gloucester, Archbishop of York)
07Nov1862, Riot in Blackburn – It is in the papers, but is hardly credible that the Bishop of Gloucester is appointed Archbishop of York !
08Jul1879, Without the Notorious Woman – We dined at the Archbishop of York’s, meeting a very pleasing young Crown Prince of Sweden. Curious to see a Bernadotte still firm in Royal position, when the Napoleons are so overthrown…

 

Thynne, Alexander George (son: 4th Marquess of Bath)
04Nov1878, Sunday Out to Longleat – The 3 girls and darling boykin of 7 are here…the boy Alexander very like my recollection of Lord Herbert.

 

Thynne, John Alexander, 4th Marquess of Bath
20Oct1878, A War With Afghanistan – Much politics prevail, and Dizzy’s left ear ought to burn continuously! Ld. Bath and Ld. Carnarvon are desperately down upon him. We are on the verge of a war with Afghanistan, upon a squabble with the Ameer for which we have ourselves to thank; it would be a horrid calamity, and the jingo notion that our Indian frontier wants advancing is shown by Lord Lawrence to be utterly wrong: it could only weaken us.

 

Thynne, Thomas Henry, 5th Marquess of Bath
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage. Lord Weymouth, [FN: Now 5th Marquess of Bath.] a very nice and very handsome boy, was a good deal with us. It was a most stately and beautiful sight: a day of floods of sunshine,

 

Tichborne Verdict, see Orton, Arthur

 

Tietjens, Thérèse Johanne Alexandra
09Jun1862, Red Letter Day at Cambridge – a delightful concert, Titiens singing gloriously

 

Tollemache, Lionel
08Dec1863, A Visit from Ld. Frederic – Mr. Tollemache, though nearly blind and with a terrific stutter, is clever and can be agreeable.
09Dec1863, A Capital Little Dance – have been discussing Church questions with Ld. F., and the end not justifying the means with Mr. Tollemache, in re charity balls and bazaars.

 

Thompson, William Hepworth, Master of Trinity College
18Mar1877, Visiting Alfred at Cambridge – After this, we went straightway to Newnham Coll., where they left me and I had a delightful troll with the nice old Principal (Miss Clough)… There seems to be all proper care and chaperonage, and regular hours, but no stupid primness or unnecessary constraint. Went round by the Backs to call on Nora Sidgwick: then paid a visit to Mrs. Thompson…

 

Townshend, John Robert, 1st Earl Sydney
18Jun1865, No Afternoon Sermon – afternoon walk to Lord Sydney’s fine park. The church close by Lord Richard’s garden (N.B. I am to say Uncle Richard, says he!), pretty and carefully arranged.

 

Trench, Richard Chenevix, Dean of Westminster
26May1859, The Old Race of French Kings – who is going to send us tickets for Handel at the Abbey next month — Bliss!
17Jun1869, Irish Church Bill Second Reading – They are debating upon the second reading of the Irish Church Bill…Archbishop Trench was so fearfully grubous and grim, it was like nothing so much as a passing bell, and he is said to have called the House “my brethren” more than once !

 

Trevelyan, Charles Edward, 1st Baronet
10Apr1869, New Fashions – I wore a square-cut blue silk trimmed with lace, with full hanging sleeves and a little lace and blue topknot ; a new fashion for London and destined, I hope, to cut out low gowns! But alas! at Lady de Grey’s afterwards I was the only person minus shoulders.
29Apr1874, Sir Ch. Trevelyan Remembers – Went off into reminiscences of his youth, a propos of the great increase of religious earnestness: said he used to be sent as a boy to see the “promenade” in the Park on Sundays of all the beauty and fashion driving and gossiping. Those who didn’t were called Saints.

 

Trevelyan, George Otto, 2nd Baronet
07Jun1862, Volume 7 of the Diary Begins – (how I have murdered his name!) was in the train with us: he has written first-rate comic verses
15Nov1865, Trevelyan’s ‘Cawnpore’ – I finished Mr. Trevelyan’s book, “Cawnpore,” which is fearfully graphic and said to be entirely accurate.
06Mar1866, Bride: Measles, Groom: Gout – We met clever young Mr. Trevelyan (I should like to know once for all how to spell his name!).
02Mar1869, People Rave of the Speech – Smart dinner at Mr. and Ly. Margaret Beaumont’s ; sat between Lord Clarendon and Mr. Trevelyan, and was too well off. I was dying to hear what was going on between Ly. M., Ld. Salisbury and Ld. Clarendon.
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – Dined with the G. O. Trevelyans, meeting the Secularist Education firebrand Mr. Morley [FN: John Morley, afterwards Viscount Morley of Blackburn], who, however, was as gentle as a sucking dove to talk to.
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – The main principle is clearly laid down in the 2nd Resolution as it is to be amended, viz., “that the Porte has sacrificed all claim to either moral or material support from England.” This amended form is to be proposed by Mr. Trevelyan, and Uncle W. will not press the remaining Resolutions…
06May1877, Gladstone Speech after Pandemonium – For once Auntie P. and I sacrificed L. Hospital bodily, having places at the House for the Great Speech. I was with Gerty in the Ballot box. After the altered mode of procedure was announced there were 2 hours of pandemonium. The Tories received Mr. Trevelyan’s amendment and Uncle W.’s acceptance of it with shouts of laughter, and of course from their side came many taunts…
16Feb1881, Still Dislikes Matthew Arnold – Dined with the Trevelyans, met Matt. Arnolds (oh ! still I feel of him as I did 25 years ago—” I do not like you, Dr. Fell “). He was agreeable enough and there was good literary talk about Carlyle and George Eliot; but his chin was always in the air…Drum at Ly. Reay’s, where I saw Alfred who said such a warm, loving word of thanks for my letter.
18Jun1881, Dear Little Ethel Fane – The odd couple, Auberon Herbert and his wife, are here,…Lady Florence very nice. Ly. Lymington, Ch. Clifford, and the Giotto Trevelyans [FN: A name she gives to Sir George Otto and Lady Trevelyan.] also here.

 

Trollop, Anthony
18May1869, Finished “Phineas Finn” – Finished “Phineas Finn” [FN: Anthony Trollope's novel.] ; it has cleverness and some successful characters, but is a disagreeable, sham sort of book.
Editor Bailey’s footnote: I have heard it described by a Cabinet Minister as the truest picture of Parliamentary life in English fiction, And he quoted a Prime Minister who shared his opinion.

 

Tuckley, Henry
27Jul1869, Letter from Henry Tuckley – Had a touching letter from Henry Tuckley, a young man who was taken to St. Martin’s workhouse in a half-mad state, and whose story of running away from his employer..seems on inquiry to be true…I got him under Mr. Shaw Stewart at the Newport Market refuge. We have got the money for him to emigrate to Canada..(Heard startlingly soon that he had become a Wesley minister!! Wrote to caution him.)
19Sep1869, My Poor Workhouse Hero – I have heard from my poor workhouse hero, who is safe in Canada, and has an appointment as Wesleyan minister!!!!

 

Turvil, Mr.
04Jul1859, Two Balls – I danced with Mr. Turvil and Johnny, and was asked to valse ever so often…

 

Tyndall, Louisa Charlotte (née Hamilton)
23Jan1876, Wonders About Wine and Childbirth – Mary (Frank) Lascelles has a little girl. Nora Balfour is to marry a Cambridge Moral Philosopher, Professor Sidgwick; a dau. of Ld. Claud Hamilton, Professor Tyndall!!!

 

U [TOP]

 

V [TOP]

Van de Weyer, Elizabeth Anne Sturgis (née Bates)
05Jul1866, Some Civilities for the King of the Belgians – to M. Van de Weyer’s, wishing to set some civilities on foot for the King of the Belgians, who has come for Pss. Helena’s marriage

 

Vane, Lady
04May1863, A Speech by Uncle William – Ly. H. Vane’s ball where I danced with Messrs. Lascelles and Wortley, Lord Cowper, Lord Lennox
28May1867, Very Mad Did I Feel – Emma and I went together alone to Lady Vane’s ball ; and very mad did I feel when I found myself dancing, vis-à-vis to Emma, with young Mr. Cecil Parker.

 

Vane-Tempest, Adolphus Frederick Charles William (m: Susan, dau. of Duke of Newcastle)
04Jul1865, Duke of Newcastle and His Miserable Daughter – Also saw dear Miss Dennett, now a little old lady, with traces in her worn face of the wretched life she must have had, striving to make peace between the poor Duke of Newcastle in his fatal anger and mismanagement, and his miserable daughter, when her whole self-will was set upon that tragical marriage.

 

Vane-Tempest, Susan Charlotte Catherine (née Pelham-Clinton) (dau. of Duke of Newcastle)
04Jul1865, Duke of Newcastle and His Miserable Daughter – Also saw dear Miss Dennett, now a little old lady, with traces in her worn face of the wretched life she must have had, striving to make peace between the poor Duke of Newcastle in his fatal anger and mismanagement, and his miserable daughter, when her whole self-will was set upon that tragical marriage.

 

Vaughan, Dr.
11Feb1861, Doncaster Church – Dr. Vaughan: I greatly dislike his curious, silky, feminine voice.
12Feb1866, Ambassador Charles Adams – We had luncheon at the Speaker’s, meeting the Adams (American Minister) and Dr. Vaughan. Mrs. Adams tickled me by saying “va-ga-ries” and “de-co-rous.”
28Apr1872, Dr. Vaughan Preacht Well – London – We went a.m. to the dear Temple, which was crowded. Dr. Vaughan preacht well, I believe ; but I grieve to say I was taken sleepy and lost much.

 

Vernon, Augustus Henry Vernon, 6th Baron Vernon
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week – It’s rather absurd that I have never given a list of the Chatsworth party during the Royal week ; here they all are

 

Vesey, Constance (née Lawley) (m: Captain Hon. Eustace Vesey)
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – To tea with the Wortleys, high gee Margaret’s engagement to Reginald Talbot; a handsome couple; also Constance Lawley’s to Eustace Vesey, after some years’ attachment, he in India, lately returned.

 

Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, Duchess of Kent (mother of Queen Victoria, sister of Albert’s father and Leopold, King of the Belgians)
31Dec1861, Saddened Year is Past – includingthe death of the Duchess of Kent

 

Princess Victoria, Princess Royal, (dau: Queen Victoria)
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – she is now quite out, and consequently only danced with grown-ups, the Duke of Cambridge principally.
10May1858, Princess Royal – dear Princess Royal begged Lady Raglan to tell Granny how happy she was
14Jan1859, Bishop of London – Our Princess Royal’s confinement is daily expected
28Jan1859, Princess Royal Has a Son – being of the mature age of 18, bless her
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – Princess Royal become exactly like the Queen, whom in a manner she represented. She looked a little sad, and was the one who cried most
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – I was delighted to see photographs of Princess Royal’s trio, of whom Pr. William seems like her brothers, Prss. Charlotte like her, and Pr. Albert something too ugly.
11Jul1871, The Princess Royal – I dined at No. 11…Smart 5 o’clock tea there, for the Crown Prince and Princess…It was nice to see our dear little Princess Royal again : her face and whole self the most loveable and winning that can be imagined, considering that she is just a little bunchy German woman. But it is the Queen’s grace, dignity, and straightforward kindliness of manner exactly. She came into the room asking eagerly for Agnes, to whom she spoke affectionately of Meriel but, to my grief, never made me out.
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage…Our dear Princess Royal was in good looks, being thinner; their eldest son,[FN: Afterwards German Emperor.] an ugly fellow, was with them; and there was a funny little brother of the Duchess of Connaught, about 9 years old, just like her in face, and as set-up and grave as a commander-in-chief in his little military uniform.

 

Princess Victoria, Princess Royal, (dau: Prince/Princess of Wales)
18Apr1869, All the Wales Children – Prince George, however, is hardly pretty, but looks a wag ; Princess Louise a tiny edition of Princess Alice ; and the baby a placid white creature, with prominent bright blue eyes, exactly like the Queen.
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – In front of us sat 3 very good little fair girls and one very good little knickerbocker boy, who turned out to be Princess Royal’s younger children: very ugly though nice little phizzes.

 

Queen Victoria
01May1855, The Queen’s Ball – every time we went close up to the Queen and Prince ; so near that I verily believe Willy would twice have “punched” Prince Albert, if I hadn’t drawn his arm back
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – frocks, carriages, dancing, introduced to the Queen
29May1856, Her Majesty’s Birthday – the day of illuminations in honour of the Peace
28Jan1859, Princess Royal Has a Son – the Queen a grandmother
07Jun1859, The Opening of Parliament – she read her speech, so distinct that I heard perfectly
11Jun1859, Presented at Court – “I am so glad to see them: tell your Mother (Granny) how nice they looked.”
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – happiness to see the Queen dancing the quadrilles with her colossal uniformed partners, majesty and grace in every movement of her little form
18Dec1861, Prince Albert Has Died – someone mentioned Granny to the Queen, she said, “Ah, she knew our happy, happy life.”
19Dec1861, The Queen weeps for Albert – The Queen threw herself on the Prince with one fervent kiss, and then let herself be led quietly away, with such a look of despair on her face
26Dec1861, There Will Be War – Willy Gladstone has heard from the Prince of Wales, who says “the Queen is sadly shattered.”
27Dec1861, Talk With Old Nevy – Ly. C. Barrington wrote from Osborne with good accounts of the Queen
30Dec1861, He taught me how to reign – She said to Ld. Granville: “He taught me how to reign. I hope I shall show that I can do it.”
31Dec1861, Saddened Year is Past – our Queen now setting out on the untried sea of loneliness and affliction
06Jan1862, Regal Duties Alone – Hagley – poor Queen has had to hold a Privy Council to-day; so soon to be obliged to take upon her the regal duties alone and unsupported!
23Jan1862, 200 Hartley Colliers Found Dead – 200 dead, the Queen had sent a telegram, which said “her heart bled for them”
28Jan1862, Queen Writes to Shields – most touching and beautiful in its tone of real sympathy, coming from a heart so broken
05Feb1862, Fox Hunting at Althorp – Granny showed me the most piteous heart-broken letter, which she has received from the Queen, who has sent her a miniature photograph of the Prince in a brooch
07Feb1862, Hair amazingly done up – Two fine prints of the Queen and Prince arrived, given by the Queen
22Feb1862, Arthur a page – Arthur is gazetted as Page to the Queen
14Jun1862, The Queen’s Duty to Her Subjects – her intention of never again taking part in court gaieties…There is no fear but that she will do this, as soon as she feels it to be her duty
11Jan1863, A copy of the Prince’s speeches – Granny has received from the Queen a copy, in white morocco, of the Prince’s speeches
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – most moving point in all the ceremony was the presence of the Queen, who took no public part, but sat in her place (visible to all in the choir) at the N. of the altar, in her widow’s weeds
16May1863, The Drawing Room – the last drawing-room I was at, the Queen stood there ; the unexampled sunshine of her life yet uneclipsed, and her husband beside her
19Jun1863, A Maid-of-Honour!!!!!!! – Ly. Augusta Bruce has written to Granny to ask whether, on a vacancy occurring, and the Queen being graciously pleased to offer it, there wd be any objection to my accepting the post of Maid-of-Honour!!!!!!!
26Aug1863, Warrant of Appointment – I received my warrant of appointment, for which superfluity I am to pay £25
10Sep1863, First Day as Maid-of-Honour – “Her Majesty desires your Ladyship to bring Miss Lyttelton into the corridor.”
12Sep1863, Beginning to Like Court Life – The Queen went, unattended, to plant a new oak in the place of Herne’s oak, which has lately fallen
14Sep1863, My First Waiting Ends – The Queen was to go to Balmoral this evening, but we were allowed to go early
14Dec1863, Something of a Dream – This day 2 years ago the Prince Consort died. A Times leading article takes the opportunity to give the poor Queen another of its numerous lectures
06Jan1864, Dreading a Second Waiting – I dread Osborne very much—indeed I am altogether awed in looking forward
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – The Queen and Princess Helena went to Windsor early ; and this evening the Queen sent a telegraph saying all was well
13Jan1864, Queen Causes General Acceleration – When the Queen arrived there were 7 doctors in the house who had all appeared on the scene just in time to be too late, except Brown, who came in for it all.
16Jan1864, Parkhurst Women Convicts – the poor women convicts found out it was the Queen and numbers fell on their knees begging for mercy and pardon, so as quite to upset those who heard them, and the Queen said she was sure, if one had managed to fall down at her feet, she must have forgiven her
17Jan1864, Dining With the Queen – and thus I saw her to speak to for the 1st time. She took my hand and kissed me so kindly before getting into the carriage.
20Jan1864, Dining With the Queen Again, So Sad – Osborne – but it has put before my very eyes something of the sorrow which hitherto I cd only picture to myself ; and this did go deep into my heart.
05Feb1864, Parliament Opens Without the Queen – One can’t blame the Queen for shrinking from doing it this one year more : even with the Prince by her side, her nervousness used to be nearly overpowering
26Feb1864, Made Southerners of Us All – I wrote word that it was very inconvenient, and await the result in a state of nervous tension. I shd be there for Holy Week and Easter Day ! Horrid thought !
19Mar1864, Sibyl Grant’s Wedding – I being in waiting, failing 2 absent ones, stood on the steps of the Throne, just behind the fat backs of the Dss. of Cambridge and Prss. Mary
07Apr1864, The Queen’s Peculiar Desolation – this (as is supposed) has led to her putting into the Times a statement of her determination to continue to delegate to others the matters of mere ceremonial, at the same time that she will never shrink from anything that may be beneficial to the people, of whose loyal affection she speaks warmly
15Apr1864, I Am in a New Life – The Queen has got neuralgia in her face, and has accordingly put off the reception that was to have been to-morrow.
16Apr1864, My Brothers Visit Windsor – I took them for a peep at the corridor ; they were in mortal dread of being caught by “Her Sacred Majesty” ; but no such thing happened.
20Apr1864, Third Waiting Ends – The Queen went to Osborne abt 4: Ly. Caroline, Ly. Augusta and I, off duty, came to London.
25Apr1864, First Letter to Fred – The Queen was as kind as possible to me: saying as she kissed me, “I must congratulate you, but I must scold you a little too!”
29Apr1864, Fourth Waiting Continues – The Queen asked if F. wd come and see me at Windsor: I had no notion it wd be allowed: O how nice it wd be!
04May1864, A Golden Day – The Queen being so kind as to hold a Privy Council to-day, Ld. Granville brought Fred (who is his private secretary)
07May1864, Poor Princess Helena – I am much distressed about poor Prss. Helena who is cruelly overworked, the Queen having no notion how her mind and body are strained, and indeed having no one to take her place.
08May1864, No Chaperon, Heathenish – I read Trench on the Parables, but feel rather heathenish. We dined with the Queen. F. wrote a dear letter.
11May1864, The Queen’s Second Court – We all came up to London for the Queen’s 2nd Court : a very small one, but very striking and imposing.
13May1864, Good-byes are Sad Matters – the Queen sent for me to say good-bye… She kissed me again and again, saying she thought and felt the more for me because I had no mother.
24May1864, Luncheon at Devonshire House – The Queen’s birthday was kept for the first time since the Prince’s death : plenty of illuminations.
05Jul1864, No More Maidlessness – delightful letters from Atie. P., Lou, Lavinia, At. Emy, M., and one from Mrs. Bruce, inviting F. and me to luncheon at Windsor “de part la Reine,” on Saturday, June 26!
15Dec1864, A Reproach to the Queen – attacks made upon her, striving as she does in her terrible bereavement and loneliness, to do all the necessary duties, while she never misses an opportunity of showing thoughtful kindness and sympathy for the joys and sorrows of others.
18May1865, Princess Helena Holds a Drawing-room – Princess Helena held the Drawing-room for the Queen, who has held 5 “Courts” this year, but is a little perverse (I must use the word) in refusing to hold Drawing-rooms, which are much less exertion.
24May1865, Sunday Jackets but Rather Bored – Queen’s birthday, kept with guns, bells, illuminations, and holyday as of old.
30May1865, Eddy and Emma Engaged – The poor Queen may have reason to complain and to wish the Lords Cavendish would not make a point of marrying her Maids!
06Jun1865, Eddy Visits the Queen – Eddy came, looking very bright and dear: says the Queen and Princess Helena have been very kind and cordial; but the poor Queen says, as soon as anyone thoroughly suits and pleases her, she marries!
19Oct1865, Lord Palmerston Has Died – It is hoped that the Queen will send for Lord Russell ; but there is no one now to advise her, and how terribly she must want the Prince !
23Oct1865, A Visit to Lord Houghton’s – The Queen has appointed Ld. Russell to form a ministry, to the violent rage of the Times. Letters
15Dec1865, General Mourning for the King of the Belgians – The Queen will nevertheless appear at the opening of Parliament, but will not read the Speech, or wear the robes (which are to be laid on the throne !). A great thing it is, however.
06Feb1866, The Queen Opens Parliament – A notable red-letter day. The dear Queen opened Parliament in person for the first time since her widowhood ; going in great state, drawn by 8 cream-colours, all her other carriages with 6 horses ; a large escort attending her.
22Jun1866, The Queen is to Blame – The Queen is seriously to blame for staying at Balmoral till Monday ; nothing can be settled without her presence, and rumours run wild : resignation, dissolution, and a vote of confidence being all on the cards.
25Jun1866, Universal Complaint – The poor Queen’s terrible fault in remaining (or indeed being) at Balmoral has given rise to universal complaint, and much foul-mouthed gossip. She is travelling up to-night.
05Jul1866, Some Civilities for the King of the Belgians – to M. Van de Weyer’s, wishing to set some civilities on foot for the King of the Belgians, who has come for Pss. Helena’s marriage, and is not only quartered at an hotel, which is the poor Queen’s way now, but left without even a Royal carriage.
08Dec1866, Queen Unveils a Statue – The Queen has sent Wolverhampton into an ecstasy by going there herself in full state, open carriage and all, to unveil a statue of the Prince Consort. It is the first time (in England) since his death, that she has taken such public part on a festive occasion.
15Jul1867, The Sultan and Viceroy of Egypt – Big swell drum at Stafford House in honour of the Viceroy of Egypt…I am a little exasperated at such a splash for 2 scampish old Turks, when nothing has been done for any Christian potentate ; however, it is a good thing to see Buckingham Palace doing duty, and the Queen coming forward with gracious civilities.
17Jul1867, The Review for the Sultan – and saw the potentates arrive ; the Sultan, a thin-faced, fat-bodied, shrewd-looking creature…and the Queen, in spite of the weather, came from the Isle of Wight to meet him in the Victoria and Albert, took him on board, and invested him with the ribbon of the Garter there and then
25Feb1868, Dizzy: Lord High Conjuror – Great news! Lord Derby has resigned, owing to broken health; and the Lord High Conjuror has got to the top of the ladder, viz., Dizzy is Prime Minister!! His party take it with a bad grace. I wonder how the Queen likes it.
12May1868, The Girls Not Presented – spent most of the rest of the day struggling thro’ the Drawing-room, which took us 4 hours. The Queen hardly stayed an hour, so we had the great blow of the girls not being presented to her.
13May1868, The Queen Outshines the Princess – with M. to see the Queen lay the 1st stone of S. Thomas’ Hospital on the S. bank of the river, which she did with great state, driving slowly in an open carriage and four… They say she had some fear of being shot at by a Fenian, but drove all the slower! She went thro’ the ceremony with all her old grace and wonderful dignity, ending with several deep curtseys to the audience ; a sight to see
15Apr1869, Invitation to Windsor – An invitation to Windsor for 3 nights ! ! the dear Queen hasn’t seen me since I married. She won’t have Fred ; I feel sure she has never forgiven him for standing on one leg and forgetting his manners that courting time at Osborne.
16Apr1869, Back at Windsor – I dined with the Queen, who greeted me very kindly and affectionately, as did Princess Christian and Princess Louise…before leaving the Queen, she talked some time to me after dinner, and so did the Princesses. I thought the Queen very well and cheerful, and as full of gracious charm and simplicity as ever.
17Apr1869, Getting the Queen Out of Isolation – I screwed up my courage, and when the Princess began upon the subject, I talked about the great desirability of the Queen’s being near London during as much as may be of the session…Princess Helena said she believed it was a thing the Prime Minister could speak to the Queen about, but that he had far better put it plainly upon her duty as head of affairs, and, above all, not use the “People say” argument, which, she said, “exasperates Mamma.”
18Apr1869, All the Wales Children – Windsor – We saw all the Wales children in the corridor…. All are terribly tiny and miniature in scale. I dined with the Queen ; the d’Alençons came, and we were very stiff and dull.
19Apr1869, Another Day at Windsor – We drove by Clewer and came back by the kitchen garden, where we had tea, the Queen making it and the little Princess jabbering away. My head is quite turned by the Queen sending me her 2 books (“Early Years” and “The Highlands”), with my name written by herself, “dear Lucy Cavendish.”
28Jun1869, The Queen’s Garden Party – The Queen held a breakfast [FN: I.e. a Garden Party.] in Buckingham Palace Gardens, so brilliant and pretty it was…Also H.M. kissed me, and asked which was the sister going to be married.
22Mar1870, The Queen Asks After Granny – I went to the Drawing-room, and the Queen asked anxiously after Granny.
10Jul1881, 50,000 Volunteers – There came off a grand review of volunteers in Windsor Park, over 50,000. No end of croakings heralded it…All went off without a hitch: railway arrangements faultless, military ones ditto. Only 130 or thereabouts had to go to the ambulance at all, and only 1 man has been ill enough (from sunstroke) to be sent into hospital. The Queen immensely delighted, and the Crown Prince of Germany, and other foreigners who were present, struck all of a heap.

 

-The published diary does not mention the Queen for two years.
27Feb1872, Thanksgiving for the Prince’s Recovery – The dear Queen sang the hymn with all her heart. When it was over, the great congregation dispersed very easily
01Mar1872, The Queen is Attacked – The Queen behaved beautifully; she was horribly frightened, and just called out “Save me” to Lady Churchill
11Mar1872, Monstrous Clothes – I thought the dear Queen looked rayonnante : she spoke to me
17Nov1872, Memoirs of Baron Stockmarit has aggravated the poor Queen inasmuch as it puts the Baron into such a position of chief adviser as rather sinks the Prince Consort into a second place
06Feb1873, Parliament Open, Charles Speaks – Parlt. opened (alas ! no Queen) ; old Charles moved the address, capitally well in expression and matter, and only a trifle too stiff in manner.
08May1873, A Gamboge-ey Green Gown – Why did I go to this May Drawing-room? Endless dismal business, too late to see the Queen, squeeze, and dead tire. Sarina and I went together, she wanting to kiss the Queen’s hand, being presented on her marriage. No such honour.
28Jun1873, Meeting Young Nicholas II – Smart garden party for the Shah at Chiswick; the Queen came and looked very cheerful with a little white about her. The Czarevitch and Cesarevna are here; he is an ugly, fair, big dog of a man; she dark and pretty and with our Princess’s manner. I had the honour of shaking hands with their two little Grand Dukes Nicholas and George; fine children, but plain.
17Feb1874, Disembodied Spirits – To London. Saw the Gladstones before dinner. He had just come from the Queen, and was looking upset and sad; he had no expectation of anything like such a crash, and, with all his longing for rest, the mighty defeat cannot but be heavy to bear. She, poor dear, is very wretched about it.7
09Dec1874, Prince George and the Greville Memoirs – He declaims about Bismarck and the Pope, and lets fly at the “Greville Memoirs” which are just out. No wonder!…What are the Queen’s retirement and over-weening love of Scotland, or even the P. of Wales’ bad habits, in comparison with the vile Court of Geo. IV, the debts and scandals of the Royal Dukes, and the horrid Queen Caroline chapter
06Mar1876, The Queen Opens a Grocers’ Wing – With Ly. Robartes and At. Coque to L. Hospital to see the Queen open the “Grocers’ Co. wing.” … The Q. very punctual : stood rather grim and glum on her platform, but at the right moments, when she did bow and smile and make those incomparable curtseys of hers, was, in spite of her little dowdy black bonnet, as Queen-like and gracious as ever.
09Jul1877, Ugly Nice Little Prince George – Smart garden-party at Marlborough House, the Queen present. I shook hands with her, to my joy; and shot that she is quite grey at last. Poor Prince Edward ill with continuing fever; ugly nice little Prince George in his cadet uniform; for they have both just passed the Naval Cadet Examination.
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – I let fly a good deal at a horrid clever little pamphlet just out, called “The Crown and the Cabinet,” which tries to make out that the Queen and Prince (!!) struggled all their time for unconstitutional personal government!!! …But I stoutly maintain that the Queen is entirely within her constitutional rights when she discusses, suggests, objects, or anything else, with her Ministers: however much of a bore she may be at times!…I can’t say I got much sympathy from Ld. Carnarvon, who, it is supposed, has had a rough time with H.M.; when I said, “Surely she might be allowed to give her own opinion to her Ministers,” all he would say was, in his little cat-voice, “I think the less she does the better” !
15Jul1878, Parliament and Princesses – Dizzy has returned high-gee his horrid Anglo-Turkish Convention… cheering crowd, and a fine bouquet handed to him in Downing Street from the Queen. I wouldn’t go within earshot! Friends and foes alike will have it he is to be made a Duke…
23Jul1878, More Derby-Salisbury Business – We talked of the horrid Derby-Salisbury business; Ld. Derby has found his mem. written at the time of his resignation, and fully bearing out what he has said, and has shown it to Ld. Granville. Whether he would have re-opened the personal matter, and crushed Lord Salisbury with the mem, I don’t know; but he has been requested by the Queen to let the subject alone.
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – supporting the Queen, who took her full part in the ceremonial, and walked as grandly as ever, looking her best in long sweeping black and white, and a diamond coronet; tho’ I do think H.M. has grown down and is a shorter woman than ever.
05May1879, Queen Called Over the Coals – A horrid debate in the H. of Commons brought on by Mr. Dillwyn, who gave notice of a motion blaming the Queen herself for certain letters and telegrams she has sent…but if she has, who is to blame? Dizzy and nobody else; for so long giving her her head and coaxing up in her ideas of prerogative which she would never have dreamt of but for him. …
12Apr1880, Queen Angry at Dizzy – The Queen didn’t return from Baden till Saturday evening: the grub is that she is very angry with Dizzy for having misled her as to the result of the dissolution and has been wigging poor innocent Sir Hicks Beach, who has been in attendance on her! Sunday morning Dizzy went down to Windsor; it is presumed to resign.
19Apr1880, Gladstone Prime Minister Again – the knowledge that the Queen would far prefer either of the existing leaders to Uncle W., whom Dizzy has bamboozled her into dreading above all things. But the arguments on the other side could not, when it came to the point, be gainsaid; and after the last few days of intense anxiety (there being one awful moment of difficulty with H.M.), our grand old ship of State has, as always, swung safely and soundly round to the wind.
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Sir Charles Dilke everybody thought would be the best man, but (a dead secret) the Queen drew the line there ! and one can’t wonder at her, as some years ago he publicly made an onslaught on the Monarchy.
12Jul1880, An Ugly Waggish Mug – Garden party at Marlborough House; the Queen there, looking her very best, walking round and very gracious. Still with perfectly perfect Royal dignity and grace, the more wonderful in a stout little great-grandmother drest in rather dowdy black…The Queen sent for Lucia Bagot and talked some time to her with a very sad, kind face about poor Constance Westminster, who is in terribly precarious health with heart attacks….
15Dec1880, At Windsor With the Queen – We had the excitement of going to Windsor to dine and sleep, also the Gladstones…The grey hair is really almost the only change in the dear Queen’s looks since my day; she was grave for the most part, and no wonder. Ireland is a great distress to her…After H.M. had done with us, we joined the Household, sitting round the round table just as of old
05Jan1881, All This a Dead Secret – H.M. took a sudden (not a new) quirk against the promise to give up Candahar in the Royal Speech, and kept the unhappy Ministers hours at Osborne, bringing her round — Uncle W. having to telegraph argumentative messages in cipher! All this is a dead secret, but everyone knew the delayed departure of the Ministers
23Feb1881, Courage to Tackle the Queen – Uncle W. high-gee having gone at the Queen about Ash Wednesday. H.M. had fixed a Council at Windsor for that day at a church-going hour, and neither Althorp [FN: I.e. Lord Spencer] nor Ld. Granville had the courage to tackle her! Uncle W. did, however, with perfect success; H.M. thanking him politely and fixing the hour much later.
19Sep1881, President Garfield Dies – On the 19th President Garfield died, after a marvellous struggle for life of — weeks. A few days ago he was moved from Washington to fresher and purer air, the great heat having tried him…the bullet was in quite a different place from what the doctors thought, and there were frightful signs of blood-poisoning….
04Nov1881, Gladstone’s Thoughts on Resignation – In the next place, his position towards the Queen was intolerable to one who throughout life had reverenced her as a constitutional sovereign, inasmuch as he now had to strive daily with her on the side of liberty as opposed to jingoism.

 

Villiers, Mr., of the Admiralty
01May1872, Religious Discussion at Dinner – Old Mr. Villiers took me in, and was highly agreeable till he plunged into the Education question

 

Villiers, George, 4th Earl of Clarendon
22Dec1867, An Audience with Pope Pius IX – Apparently he liked Lord Clarendon best of the big-wigs he saw last year, and said he hoped to see him again this year, and see what he thought of his friends (the King’s people) ; perhaps he (the Pope) might convert him !
25Apr1868, Duke Shot by Fenian – I sat at dinner between young Lord Joscelyn (a nice, handsome creature) and Lord Clarendon, who was immensely entertaining, giving me an account of his interview with the Pope this winter…Ld. C. was also great fun over Ld. Derby’s anti-compulsory-Church-Rate-abolition speech…Says I, “What a pity you could not attack him in that fashion in the H. of Lords.” “No!” says Ld. C. ; “he’s too kind to Constance” (née Villiers, married to Ld. D.’s 2nd son) “for me to abuse him.”
02Mar1869, People Rave of the Speech – Smart dinner at Mr. and Ly. Margaret Beaumont’s ; sat between Lord Clarendon and Mr. Trevelyan, and was too well off. I was dying to hear what was going on between Ly. M., Ld. Salisbury and Ld. Clarendon.

 

Voysey, Charles
23Feb1871, Voysey Condemned – A short time ago, judgment was pronounced in the Privy Council against Voysey, a miserable clergyman who published a book called “The Sling and the Stone,” in which he very distinctly repudiates every article of the Christian Faith except the 1st clause of the Apostles’ Creed.

 

W [TOP]

Waldegrave, Lady, see Parkinson-Fortescue, Frances Elizabeth
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – I dined as a face with A. P. and Wortleys at Ly. Waldegrave’s
17May1865, Maid Troubles – We went to Lady Waldegrave’s and Lady de Grey’s ; where we were well squashed, but somewhat amused.

 

Wales, Edward, Prince of
01May1855, The Queen’s Ball – The Prince of Wales asked me if I could dance it, but alas! I couldn’t. His Highness danced with Agnes, and so did Prince Alfred: happy girl!
25Apr1856, A Royal Ball – the Prince of Wales danced just opposite to where I was standing ; so I saw his beautiful dancing famously.
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – just come back from abroad, decidedly grown, tanned, and more manly looking
18Dec1861, Prince Albert Has Died – left fatherless to be the stay and support of the desolate Queen
20Sep1862, Prince of Wales engaged to Alexandra – Delightful accounts of the amiability and attraction of Prss. Alexandra , of the P. of W’s. state of bliss
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – his face a little pale, but bright, gentle, and gracious, in its youth and happiness
02May1863, The Prince of Wales Bows – only one gentleman with him, and a groom
13May1863, Alone in a Cab – had the honour of going to a wonderfully select ball at Pam’s, to meet the Prince and Princess
15Jun1863, Meeting Howard and Jowett – he to receive a D.C.L. degree
16Jun1863, Cheers for the Prince – tremendous cheers began again and again ; till the theatre and everyone in it was ready to burst
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – played with immense zest, boyishness, good nature, and some skill, at ball with his equerries and friends, using a croquet ball
18Jun1863, Shaking Hands with the Princess – we, the select few on the lawn, of course looked at both to our heart’s content
26Jun1863, The Guards’ Ball – the beautiful effect, when T.R.H.’s went away, of the procession streaming through the antechambers and down the flag-emblazoned staircase lined with picked Guardsmen
05Feb1864, Parliament Opens Without the Queen – she still feels unequal to any State ceremonials, and the Prince and Princess of Wales are to hold levees and drawing-rooms. I fear there will be great grumbling and discontent at this
11May1864, The Queen’s Second Court – looked terribly thin and pale, in deep black ; must be wretched at the reverses of the Danes, who have just lost Duppel.
05Mar1865, At a Play with the Wales’s – A little “doment” with a French play at Ld. Granville’s, who had got the Wales’s: the Prince astonishingly fat, the Princess looking lovely, tho’ she is to be confined this summer.
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – Princess of Wales looked lovely, though thin ; the Prince’s looks are improved by an advancing yellow beard.
02Jul1866, Prince of Wales Knocked Over – A runaway man and horse, we heard, came full tilt against the Prince of Wales, who was riding with the Princess and the Queen of the Belgians, and knocked him clean over, horse and all.
09Aug1866, York Topsy-Turvy for T.R.H. – the Prince has a good-natured face, improved by beard and whiskers ; but he looks 10 years older than he is, and is likely to smoke himself to death
25Mar1868, Dizzy’s Party for the Shaky Liberals – Dizzy gives a grand party tonight for the Prince and Princess; is said to ask only such Liberals as are shaky! N.B. We are not asked.
19May1868, An Afternoon With the Prince – We all went in state to Leeds about 11.30 amid great cheers and thousands of people all along the road and swarming in the town.then another gigantic dinner, and we bowled back to Leeds, and danced in the great Town Hall : very pretty and successful. The Prince danced with me, and I liked him much.
24Feb1870, Dinner With the Prince, a Scandal – Last night we dined at No. 11 to meet the Wales’ : it was horrid for poor Auntie P. ; was all settled before the scandal got into the papers. However, to everyone’s relief, the Prince appeared voluntarily to-day as a witness, [FN: In the Mordaunt divorce case] gave very straightforward evidence, solemnly denied being guilty, and is generally believed to be quite cleared.
24Jun1870, Return to Chiswick – I drove with Lou to poor, silent, altered Chiswick (after the death of the Dow. Duchess Sutherland). The Prince of Wales has it for the present, and is going to give a big breakfast there to-morrow ; but all was deserted to-day. His children come and play here constantly
11Jul1871, The Princess Royal – I dined at No. 11. . . . Smart 5 o’clock tea there, for the Crown Prince and Princess, lately arrived at Prussia House. The Crown Prince was always attractive-looking, but now he is most noble ! such a powerful brow and eye, he must be destined to do great things.
12Dec1871, A Day at the Races – and there was no reception ; only the band struck up “God save the Queen” as he walked out of the stand. The dear old music was pathetic to hear, for, as we reached the ground, a telegram was given to the Governor announcing that the Prince of Wales’s life was despaired of yesterday. A bewildering and awful event.
01Jan1872, News of the Prince of Wales – On Board the ‘Arno’ – England has just passed (as we trust) safely through a great and touching crisis. The English packet, the Nile, brought us letters and papers up to the 16th ; all are full of the P. of Wales ; the feeling most deep and universal.
27Feb1872, Thanksgiving for the Prince’s Recovery – The Queen leant on the Prince’s arm ; he held his eldest son’s hand
29Jun1872, A Golden Day – said to be pasty-coloured in the daylight
17Dec1872, A Royal Visit to Chatsworth The Prince and Princess of Wales visit Chatsworth
20Dec1872, High Jinks and Thoughts on the Prince – Chatsworth – He does not get on with me, nor indeed much with any but chaffy, fast people.
04Jan1873, The Chatsworth Party at Royal Week
04Jul1873, Ball for the Wales’ – Ball at the Goldsmiths’ Hall, for the Wales’s; a fine sight: entrance-hall like a small Stafford House, only better, inasmuch as the marble is all real.
07Jun1873, Shah Goes to France – The Shah went off to France on Saturday, having pretty well tired out King, Lords, and Commons. Even the Prince of Wales is said to be dead beat. The French are going to make the best splash they can, but how poor, with no National Anthem, no flag, and nothing but a mushroom President.
23Jul1874, Fancy Dress Ball at Marlborough House – Conversation turned much on the fancy ball at Marlboro’ House, which came off t’other night, and for which I saw Cavendish arrayed in Tudor costume. He looked famously well and handsome—very like one’s idea of Henry VIII …
09Dec1874, Prince George and the Greville Memoirs – He declaims about Bismarck and the Pope, and lets fly at the “Greville Memoirs” which are just out. No wonder!…What are the Queen’s retirement and over-weening love of Scotland, or even the P. of Wales’ bad habits, in comparison with the vile Court of Geo. IV, the debts and scandals of the Royal Dukes, and the horrid Queen Caroline chapter
28Mar1881, The Russian Tragedy – The Royalties looked sadly grim, in blackest black; how ghastly it must be to be undergoing a Court mummery with their poor hearts all full of the Russian tragedy! The D. and Dss. of Edinburgh went off to S. Petersb. the very day of the murder,[FN: The assassination of the Emperor Alexander II.] and the P. and Prss. of Wales have gone to the Funeral. Most plucky, when there can be no sort of security against their being blown up all together.

 

Wales, Alexandra, Princess of
20Sep1862, Prince of Wales engaged to Alexandra – But there is a difficult future, in spite of its immense advantages, before the 18-yr.-old bride
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – her small head crowned with orange-flower, her step queenly, and her whole look the perfection of maiden grace
27Apr1863, Princess’s wedding gifts – Most of the jewels have been taken away, and many things were in very bad taste
02May1863, The Prince of Wales Bows – a little phaeton with pair of ponies driven by a very pretty young lady, passed us : somebody in deep mourning was with her
04May1863, A Speech by Uncle William – came quite incog. with 2 ladies, to hear the debate!
09May1863, Dining at the Gladstones – uncle and aunt dined at Marlborough House, and came away raving of the Princess of course!
16May1863, The Drawing Room – who looked pale and not so lovely as she is generally thought ; but very sweet and winning
16Jun1863, Cheers for the Prince – never shall I forget the astounding cheers when the great doors were opened, and our Princess walked up!
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – We feasted our eyes on the Princess
18Jun1863, Shaking Hands with the Princess – couldn’t make out what she said to me, with her low peculiar utterance and foreign accent
26Jun1863, The Guards’ Ball – Lord Dunmore dancing with the Prss. was a sight to see of good looks and perfect manners
09Jan1864, Second Waiting Begins – I heard the wonderful news of the Princess of Wales’s premature confinement at Frogmore of a “fine boy,”… A seven-months child ; but so was George III, who certainly throve nevertheless
11Jan1864, Pitying the Royals – the Princess of Wales delights in her baby. Poor tiny infant, how little it guesses of its great future, supposing it is to live !
19Mar1864, Sibyl Grant’s Wedding – The Princess looked very well, though thin : and the Prince immensely improved in looks and expression
13May1864, Good-byes are Sad Matters – The Prss. of Wales came at 1½ and we received her at the door.
05Mar1865, At a Play with the Wales’s – the Prince astonishingly fat, the Princess looking lovely, tho’ she is to be confined this summer.
03Jun1865, Chatsworth in June – good news of the Princess of Wales’ 2nd baby [FN: King George V.]; another little Prince ; born soon after 1 a.m. this morning after she had undergone a concert ! It is 6 weeks earlier than was expected
13Mar1866, To Marlborough House – F. shirked Marlborough House ball in the coolest way, not to miss the debate; but I went, and curtseyed to the Princess of Wales and Princess Helena: the latter looks as happy as a queen.
05Jun1866, Rather Bored at the Ball – London – Princess of Wales looked lovely, though thin ; the Prince’s looks are improved by an advancing yellow beard.
09Aug1866, York Topsy-Turvy for T.R.H. – the Princess looks lovely, but thin and tired ; I do think we trot her about too much
03Mar1868, Smart Little Party – Smart little party with singing at Stafford House that we were obliged to go to, against my will; the Prince and Princess there, she wonderfully well, and walking with only a little stiffness; I believe she expects another baby!
13May1868, The Queen Outshines the Princess – The reception was very good ; and really our little Queen in her deep black was not outshone even by the lovely, radiant Princess of Wales.
24Feb1870, Dinner With the Prince, a Scandal – Last night we dined at No. 11 to meet the Wales’ : it was horrid for poor Auntie P. ; was all settled before the scandal got into the papers… The dinner and evening went off very well ; the Princess looked lovely, but very sad when she was not exerting herself.
11Jul1871, The Princess Royal – I dined at No. 11. . . . Smart 5 o’clock tea there, for the Crown Prince and Princess, lately arrived at Prussia House. It was nice to see our dear little Princess Royal again
29Jun1872, A Golden Day – opens the Bethnal Green Museum
19Dec1872, Another Mighty Dinner The darling Prss. has got at her ease, and no words can express her perfect charm. It is not so much the loveliness of her face ; others may have as much of that, but smile, colouring, hair, contour of little head and neck, are delightful : her small slight figure is in perfect symmetry, and no one cd believe in the stiff joint of her knee except from a little pretty halt going up and down stairs.
20Dec1872, High Jinks and Thoughts on the Prince – Our Queen of Hearts was a sight never to be forgotten for grace and liveliness and fun as she whisked round the billiard-table like any dragon-fly, playing at “pockets” ; punishing the table when she missed, and finally breaking her mace across Ly. Cowper’s back with a sudden little whack. Likewise at bed-time, high jinks with all the ladies in the corridors ; and yet through all one has a sense of perfect womanly dignity
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage…The Princess of Wales looked lovely, Prince George at her side with his waggish round face, and the 3 pretty little Princesses marching in front of her.

 

Walker, Severn
22Jul1862, Butterer and Butteree – Mr. Severn Walker and Mr. Parker ciceroned, and we did SS. Andrews and Alban, the Commandery and the Museum

 

Walpole, Spencer
04Jun1859, A Day at Eton – I was taken in by Mr. Walpole (afterwards Home Secretary), such an honour!
26Jul1866, Hyde Park Riots – All London talks about the Hyde Park riots…Mr. Walpole, the Home Secretary, whose feebleness has caused the whole thing, won the heart of a deputation of Reformers by bursting into tears!!

 

Ward, Georgina Elisabeth, (née Moncreiffe) Countess of Dudley
17Jan1866, All Expecting, Ah Dear Me – Ly. Henry Scott, Ly. Granville, and Ly. Dudley are all said to be expecting babies. Ah, dear me !
27Jan1866, A Charming Ride – began “The Heart of Midlothian” to the girls. Had a charming ride on Punchy with Lavinia on Empress and Georgina on Ossa
12Feb1866, Ambassador Charles Adams – and I to Dudley House ball with the Gladstones, which felt rather mad. Ly. Dudley too lovely.

 

Ward, William , 1st Earl of Dudley
26Jun1862, A Full Day – Ld. Dudley’s lovely and successful ball; I didn’t miss one dance! Partners: Sir C. Russell, Mr. Lyme Something, Ld. Dufferin, Ld. S. Kerr
22Nov1865, Dudley Marries Moncrieffe – Yesterday Lord Dudley married Miss Georgina Moncrieffe, a beautiful girl under 20. Charles was best man ! but must have looked more like the bridegroom.
18May1868, Antidisestablishmentarianism – Lord Dudley danced with me, and I tried to coax him round about Charles, but he is in horror about Disestablishment, and I fear can only be expected not to oppose actively. The clergy are against it as one man nearly, and will take up the perilous, suicidal ground of making the English and Irish Establishments stand or fall together.

 

Warner, Mrs.
02Jul1867, A Monster Cavalcade of Swells – After which we went on to a to-do at Mrs. Warner’s, where high jinks were kept up till night-fall. I had to get home for dinner-time, as had some others

 

Watts, Isaac (hymnwriter)
17Mar1867, Withering, Shivering Blast – … a keen frost. I never could feel, with Dr. Watts, the pleasure of reflecting upon the “starving wretches,” in contrast with my comfortable self on a night like this…and oh ! I wish it would rain seal-skins !

 

Wellesley, Aurthur, Field Marshall, 1st Duke of Wellington
24Oct1865, Old Accounts of Wellington’s Death – I looked through the newspaper accounts of the Duke of Wellington’s funeral…so clearly remember Papa … to tell us of the Duke’s death, and Mamma writing to us about the funeral
24Jul1876, Painting Wellington’s Forehead – Ld. and Ly. Robartes. He and Uncle W. were good company at breakfast. He told me an anecdote of the D. of Wellington’s always insisting on having his forehead represented in painting or sculpture wider than it was, and Chantrey telling Lucas, to whom the Duke was sitting. Uncle W. (so exactly like him!) took the story desperately to heart…

 

Wellesley, Arthur Richard , 2nd Duke of Wellington
02Jun1873, Squirming Duke of Wellington – Lovely concert at Mrs. Ralli’s ; took Agnes and Helen to Apsley House ball and left them there. Never noticed the D. of Wellington before! Why does the poor little squirming man look as old as his father?

 

Wellesley, Elizabeth, 2nd Duchess of Wellington
22Jun1863, So Know All Men – bringing with them the Queen’s official offer of the post to me, through the Duchess of Wellington, Mistress of the Robes

 

Wellesley, Gerald Valerian, Dean of Windsor
19Dec1861, The Queen weeps for Albert – Granny heard from Atie. P. ; she quoted from the Dean of Windsor (who was present) the most interesting and pathetic account there has yet been
17Jan1864, Dining With the Queen – Mr. Prothero preacht on death. The Dean preacht, with a beautiful allusion to the little Prince’s birth close to his grandfather’s tomb.
19Apr1869, Another Day at Windsor – Dean talks straightforwardly and bluntly to the Queen, which she seems to like, and the conversation was animated. The Dean tries to get any notable preacher to preach before the Queen, and he said he had been much struck with a sermon of Mr. King’s, the Cuddesdon Principal, and meant to get him.
24Sep1873, Letters of Sarah, Lady Lyttelton – The Dean has now pounced upon the book, and is in raptures over it; goes off about it to me on every opportunity. Wants us to present it to the Queen, who, he is sure, will greatly like it, in spite of one or two little things which may take her aback.

 

Wellington, duchy of, see Wellesley

 

Wenlock, barony of, see Lawley

 

Wentworth-FitzWilliam, Albreda Mary (dau: William Thomas Spencer, 6th Earl FitzWilliam)
01Dec1879, No End of Luxury – The nice creatures Alice and Alby Fitzwilliam, and Katie, befriended my lame leg and carried me about ladies’ cushion; likewise I was taken round in a go-cart to see the pictures.

 

West, Algernon
29Nov1872, The Men-Servants Make Deadlocks – The Algy Wests, Trevelyans, Mr. Glyn, and Cavendish dined ; and the men-servants chose the occasion for making deadlocks all through dinner ; dealing out crashes with the lift, smashing a big dish, and sticking in the mud generally
19Apr1880, Gladstone Prime Minister Again – The announcement was what first announced to us who was Prime Minister. We went up to Harley St. afterwards. Saw Cavendish, the Roseberys, Algy West, etc. Uncle W. lost no time in asking F. to be Financial Secretary in the most kind and delightful way
03Apr1881, Gladstone Hard at Work – Algy West came to tea high-gee Budget details; had seen Uncle W. hard at work with Mr. Welby in the middle of the day, and poked fun about his Sabbath keeping. But I said I would answer for his having been to church…

 

West Indies, see Jamaica and the West Indies

 

Westminster, duchy of, see Grosvenor

 

Wharncliffe, barony of, see Stuart-Wortley-Mackenzie

 

Wickham, Agnes (née Gladstone)
27May1857, Boiled Eggs – Agnes has actually been to the Opera !
05Jun1857, Mr. Hunt – Agnes and I went through the Communion Service with him
10Mar1863, The Wedding of the Prince of Wales – Agnes and her sisters, Toney Gladstone and I, got excellent places in the nave of S. George’s Chapel
02May1863, The Prince of Wales Bows – Rode with Agnes. As we cantered up Constitution Hill
09May1863, Dining at the Gladstones – Agnes and I dined with the P. Gladstones en famille
16Jun1863, Cheers for the Prince – albeit we had nothing particular to sit on, and but little to stand on, we saw and heard famously
17Jun1863, Sleeping on the Floor – we got alternately on to the floor full length, tucked up in a chair, listened to the innumerable clocks, and went into a succession of giggles
18Jun1863, Shaking Hands with the Princess – Luckily Agnes interpreted for me
07Apr1864, The Queen’s Peculiar Desolation – Aggie and I had the treat of going to hear the Budget, which took 3 hours, and was very interesting on the whole
08Apr1864, Garibaldi and Red Shirts – Drove with Agnes to call on wonderful old Miss Robertson, in her 89th year, able to walk briskly, and hear well
24May1864, Luncheon at Devonshire House – At 5¼, F. and I, with Willie and Agnes for chaperons! rode in Rotten Row ; and I thought of our last ride at Hagley.
30Jun1866, Never Go There Again – I took Agnes to a party at Ly. Derby’s, and fervently resolved never to go there again, such were the stick-in-the-mud arrangements of the comings and goings.
07Feb1867, Tea wth the Stanleys – Entertained at 5 o’clock tea Agnes, Ly. Augusta Stanley, and her little Dean, who got through an alarming amount of bread and butter.
11Jul1871, The Princess Royal – I dined at No. 11…Smart 5 o’clock tea there, for the Crown Prince and Princess…It was nice to see our dear little Princess Royal again : her face and whole self the most loveable and winning that can be imagined, considering that she is just a little bunchy German woman. But it is the Queen’s grace, dignity, and straightforward kindliness of manner exactly. She came into the room asking eagerly for Agnes, to whom she spoke affectionately of Meriel but, to my grief, never made me out.
27May1873, Harcourt Cynical and Unprincipled – Mr. W. Harcourt was there, as cynical and unprincipled in talk as may be! The most pleasing thing he had to say was that Cavendish was the only member of the Govt. who had common sense : “He’s the leader for me.” Informed us that he sat near Bright during Uncle W.’s fine anti-Miall speech the other day (on Church disestablishment) and that Bright was in a fury therewith.
22Jul1872, Paupers in the East End – very smelly and hot, poor things
02Jun1873, Squirming Duke of Wellington – Lovely concert at Mrs. Ralli’s ; took Agnes and Helen to Apsley House ball and left them there. Never noticed the D. of Wellington before! Why does the poor little squirming man look as old as his father?
01Sep1873, A Monster Expedition to Wrekin – Papa headed a monster expedition to the top of the Wrekin… we met Aggie and Mr. Wickham, chaperoned by Mazy, Harry, and Herbert. Poor Mr. W. must have looked on bedazed as the 21 came bubbling endlessly one after another out of the saloon carriage…
30Apr1877, War Between Russia and Turkey – To Harley St. after dinner; poor Auntie P. looked worried to death, and F. is nearly wild…Agnes went to the drawing-room with Auntie P. and they looked a beautiful couple.

 

Wickham, Edward Charles (m: Aganes Gladstone) Headmaster of Wellington College, Dean of Lincoln
01Sep1873, A Monster Expedition to Wrekin – Papa headed a monster expedition to the top of the Wrekin… we met Aggie and Mr. Wickham, chaperoned by Mazy, Harry, and Herbert. Poor Mr. W. must have looked on bedazed as the 21 came bubbling endlessly one after another out of the saloon carriage…
26Apr1880, Filling Up Of Offices – Saturday we went to Wellington College and our political gossip was highly appreciated by the Wickhams and Edward (brother). Said brother is doing stop-gap master’s work, and intensely enjoying it: delightful to hear Edward Wickham’s strong approval of him.

 

Wilberforce, Samuel, Bishop of Oxford, Bishop of Winchester
24Jun1859, Those Old Times – much cut up at the defection of his very intimate friend, the Warden of All Souls’, with others
07Jul1859, The King’s Bottle-Holder – There also came Duke and Duchess of Argyle, Bp. of Oxford, Mrs. Norton, and the King’s “bottle-holder”
26Jun1862, A Full Day – a delightful clever bkfast, whereat were Bp. of Oxford, Archie Sinclair, Papa, Mr. Palgrave, and others
07Nov1862, Riot in Blackburn – new Archbishop of York, a positive insult to the Bishop of Oxford whose curate he was!
25Feb1865, The Bishop Held a Confirmation – I can’t say I ever saw, till to-day, a Confirmation really impressively and strikingly done. But the Bishop of Oxford has always excelled in this respect
21Jul1873, Bp. of Winchester Dies From Fall – the appalling news of the death of the Bp. of Winchester…They were cantering down a grassy slope not far from Abinger Hall, when the Bishop’s horse stumbled at a grip, and came down on his knees (or all but). The Bishop was thrown over its head and, falling heavily on his head and turning right over, dislocated his neck and was killed on the spot.

 

Wilhelm II, German Emperor, (son: Princess Royal)
17Mar1879, The Queen at a Wedding – Mrs. Byng bore me off with her to see the Duke of Connaught’s marriage…Our dear Princess Royal was in good looks, being thinner; their eldest son,[FN: Afterwards German Emperor.] an ugly fellow, was with them; and there was a funny little brother of the Duchess of Connaught, about 9 years old, just like her in face, and as set-up and grave as a commander-in-chief in his little military uniform.

 

Wilkinson, Mr., preaching at S. Peter’s
24Mar1872, Mr. Wilkinson and Dismal Jemmy at Church – where we went to hear for the 1st time the now famous Mr. Wilkinson. He adopts something of the Wesley method—arousing, chiding, and appealing

 

Williams, Rowland
25Feb1864, A Decision by the Privy Council – violent excitement at the Privy Council having passed a judgment in favour of Wilson and Williams, 2 writers in the ” Essays and Reviews,” whom the Bp. of Salisbury and another indicted before it.

 

Williamson, Professor
23Aug1875, The Duke’s Leg is Unwell – if the Duke’s leg would only get well, but it is the slowest job. An old Professor Williamson, who, in spite of snow-white hair, has a young wife and a baby of 7 weeks old, dropt from the skies, and has been attending to the leg, which is a great blessing…

 

Wilson, H. B.
25Feb1864, A Decision by the Privy Council – violent excitement at the Privy Council having passed a judgment in favour of Wilson and Williams, 2 writers in the ” Essays and Reviews,” whom the Bp. of Salisbury and another indicted before it.

 

Wilson, Mathew, 1st Baronet
02Feb1874, Like Tragedy and Comedy – the people listened famously well, and I enjoyed the sight of their keen, shrewd faces… My proudest time was during the questions, in which my old Fred does certainly excel…What with F.’s profound earnestness and his humorous hitting, they are a good deal like Tragedy and Comedy.
12Feb1874, We Came Out Triumphant – We came out triumphant, 3 cheers! F. at the head, Mr. Wilson only 23 behind him…I “put in” the time of suspense pretty well, skating with the Law girls in Peel Park…. Our news came at 4.30…. I much feared I should kiss Mr. Law, dear man, or Mr. Wilson, or both; but it was happily averted.
29Mar1880, Borough Elections – As for F. and Sir Matthew Wilson, they have been making a regular triumphant “progress,” and great fun it has been for me. Farming districts, big colliery villages, and manufacturing towns — it’s all the same; close-packed meetings, roars of applause, all but unanimous shows of hands, and frantic enthusiasm of man, woman, and child.

 

Wilson-Patten, John, 1st Baron Winmarleigh
26Aug1868, Electioneering – Emma and I drove to Grange Hotel to call on the Wilson Pattens, and saw Col. P. himself. He was quite moved at the notion of our calling upon them, apparently thinking his coalition with Captain Stanley against Cavendish would make bitter enemies of us all.

 

Window, Mr., photographer
12May1864, My Last Regal Journey – F. and I went (with Atie. P.. and Ly. Louisa) to be photographed together by Mr. Window.
Windsor, Dean of, see Wellesley, Gerald Valerian

 

Windsor, Lady Harriet Clive, Baroness Windsor
04Jul1859, Two Balls – We had a prim luncheon at Ly. Windsor’s, where nice Victoria Clive sang all the tunes that all old cows have died of
23Jun1865, Granny Reads a Picture Book – To St. St., where Great-Granny was entertaining with a picture-book little George and Mary. Dined there, and chaperoned Aunt C. afterwards to Ly. Windsor’s.

 

Windsor-Clive, Lady Mary Selina Louisa (née Bridgeman)
27Aug1862, A Perverted Game of Croquet – Also I saw Mrs. and Amelia Claughton, Ly. Mary Clive with her fair small children

 

Windsor-Clive, Robert George, 1st Earl of Plymouth
27Aug1862, A Perverted Game of Croquet – the little boy a merry dot, his birthday to-day, so his health was drunk

 

Windsor-Clive, Victoria
04Jul1859, Two Balls – We had a prim luncheon at Ly. Windsor’s, where nice Victoria Clive sang all the tunes that all old cows have died of
27Aug1862, A Perverted Game of Croquet – it was nice seeing a good deal of Victoria Clive, who is charming, also Bennetts, Sandys, Fosters, Bakers, Wake-men, etc
24Jun1865, Be Civil to the Constituents – Mary and Victoria Clive came to tea, M. to dinner

 

Wingfield, Mervyn, 7th Viscount Powerscourt
24May1873, Junket to Cassiobury – Had the junket of going to Cassiobury [FN: The house of Lord Essex.]. So seldom do we see new places, that I do enjoy it…The Powerscourts and Fredk. Stanleys are here. F. had to do birthday dinner at No. 11 and came here Sunday.

 

Winmarleigh, barony of, see Wilson-Patten

 

Wolrige, Capt.
28Oct1863, More Celebrations – spoke very well, proposing C.’s health, and presented an excellent address, signed by nearly all the parish

 

Wolseley, Garnet, 1st Viscount Wolseley
25Mar1874, The Lion: Sir Garnet Wolseley – Dined at No. 11, meeting no less a lion than Sir Garnet Wolseley [FN: Afterwards Viscount Wolseley. He had just returned from the Ashantee War.] with all his laurels fresh.

 

Wolverton, barony of, see Glyn

 

Wood, Agnes Elizabeth (née Courtenay) (m: 2nd Viscount Halifax)
22Apr1869, Charlie Wood Marries Lady Cortenay – Mr. Charlie Wood [FN: Now Viscount Halifax.] married Lady Agnes Courtenay : they received the H. Communion afterwards and the service took an hour and a half.
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – Found ourselves arriving with the Charles Woods, [FN: Mr. and Lady Agnes Wood: afterwards Viscount and Viscountess Halifax.]…Various ladies had failed, so Ly. Agnes and I were made much of.

 

Wood, Charles, 1st Viscount Halifax, (aka Sir Charles Wood, 1846 – 1866)
08Jul1859, Have Enjoyed This Ball More Than Any Other – Aunt Pussy grabbed Sir C. Wood, and sent him off to find (?) for the Comte de Paris

 

Wood, Charles Lindley, 2nd Viscount Halifax
22Apr1869, Charlie Wood Marries Lady Cortenay – Mr. Charlie Wood [FN: Now Viscount Halifax.] married Lady Agnes Courtenay : they received the H. Communion afterwards and the service took an hour and a half.
18Feb1878, A New Craze Called a Telephone – Found ourselves arriving with the Charles Woods, [FN: Mr. and Lady Agnes Wood: afterwards Viscount and Viscountess Halifax.]

 

Wood, Lady Mary (née Grey) (m: 1st Viscount Halifax)
08Jul1859, Have Enjoyed This Ball More Than Any Other – A very delightful ball at Ly. Mary Wood’s, of which the following were the great events. The Comte de Paris was there, and he engaged Susy Clinton for a quadrille, and set off to find a vis-à-vis. He returned saying ” Ii n’y en a pas ! ” whereupon Atie. P. grabbed Sir C. Wood, and sent him off to find one.
20Dec1866, Some Mourning Things – Ly. Halifax and I drove to Doncaster, where I got some mourning things for old Lady Chesham who has just died.

 

Wood, William, Lord Chancellor
27Feb1872, Thanksgiving for the Prince’s Recovery – There were nine other carriages, including the new Speaker (Mr. Brand) in a gorgeous coach, and the Ld. Chancellor

 

Wordsworth, Elizabeth
03Nov1879, Long Talk With Cardinal Newman – Lavinia took me to see Ly. Margaret Hall [FN: The recently founded first Women's College in Oxford.] (I wish it didn’t sound like a lady who has made a dowdy marriage), which is full already, and will flourish finely when once they have paid off the debt on the house and the starting expenses. Miss Wordsworth is delightful. We also called at “Somerville Hall,” which is the same thing, only colourless in religion, but the Head, Miss Lefevre, (one of the daughters of old Sir John, who is lately dead), was out.

 

Worms, Mr.
16Feb1866, Cattle Plague Rages – Cattle-plague rages in the House : a very stringent Bill is being passed, forbidding all movement of cattle along railways, and ordering the immediate slaughter of all diseased beasts. plausible remedy up just now, discovered by a Mr. Worms ; a mixture of onions and asafoetida

 

Wortley, Jane (née Lawley) (Cousin Jane, cousin of Mamma) (dau: Aunt Wenlock)
15Jun1859, A Torrent of People – Cousin Jane (Wortley) gave us beautiful parasols and sashes, and dear Mrs. Talbot such muslin gowns
29Jun1859, Our First Queen’s Ball – Oh, how cd I forget: I dined as a face with A. P. and Wortleys at Ly. Waldegrave’s, where I saw and was introduced to the “King of France,” God bless him!

 

Wortley, James Archibald Stuart-Wortley (Cousin Jem) (m: Jane Lawley) (bro: Caroline Jane Talbot)
11May1859, Unitarians and Dissenters – Hagley – C. Jem Wortley has been beaten for the W. Riding by 2,000: not a large majority. The Leeds people are wild with fervour at Dr. Hook; Unitarians and Dissenters speak enthusiastically of him.
14Jun1871, Talking With Lord Russell – Dined with the Wortleys; he looks wonderfully better. No less (and no bigger) a person than Lord Russell took me in to dinner, and was delightful, with his dry humourous anecdotes. Said his 1st political recollection was Pitt’s going out of office ; also said Lord Castlereagh used to be very kind to him, but, on his displeasing him once, told him he ought to be whipped! He remembers…
21Apr1877, Figure of Papa by Forsyth – To tea with the Wortleys, high gee Margaret’s engagement to Reginald Talbot; a handsome couple; also Constance Lawley’s to Eustace Vesey, after some years’ attachment, he in India, lately returned.

 

Wortley, Mary Caroline (m: Ralph Gordon Noel King, 2nd Earl of Lovelace) (dau: Cousin Jane)
18May1865, Princess Helena Holds a Drawing-room – Carry Lawley [FN: Daughter of Lord Wenlock.] and Mary Wortley [FN: Afterwards wife of the 2nd Earl of Lovelace. The two girls were cousins of each other and of Lady Frederick] were brought out : Carry is very handsome, towering above her jenny-wren of a mother.
04Jul1866, Big Party at D. House – Big party at D. House: I chaperoned Mary Wortley and Charlotte Farquhar! We dined there; Cavendish pretended to weep over his fall

 

Wyatt, Captain Hon. Edmund Verney
22Jul1879, Comments Around Gladstone Portrait – Althorp so taken out of at the death of an ex-aide-de-camp of his, Capt. Wyatt-Edgell, at a great slaughter of the Zulus, that he would have put off the ball, if he had heard of it in time….

 

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Yonge, Charlotte Mary
08Mar1874, Yonge’s Life of Bishop Patteson – Holker – Finished this evening a book that has taken great hold upon me, and that one ought to thank God for, Miss Yonge’s Life of Bishop Patteson.

 

Yorke, Lady Agneta
16Jun1859, Worth Coming to London – Ly. Agneta Yorke and Ly. Hardwicke, who sung together with a power and pathos beyond description

 

Yorke, Bertha
04Mar1859, Drive to Obelisk Hill – The Miss Yorkes have won our hearts
16Jun1859, Worth Coming to London – talked to the nice Yorkes

 

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